mining/ore milling - mt baker mining and metals

mining/ore milling - mt baker mining and metals

We use a variety of machinery combinations to liberate the gold and concentrate it for recovery. The all-inclusive Turn-Key Ore Processor will take a loader-bucket of ore and produce concentrated gold and sulfides with no hands-on activity by the operator. For a less costly production system, using hand-fed machinery, we offer a jaw crusher, hammer mill, and shaker tableeach one a stand-alone component.Or for smaller-scale sampling with industrial-grade equipment, our low-cost combination of a hammer mill with an attached sluice gives the owner the ability to test many thousands of pounds of material to get a representative bulk sampling of ore values.

The jaw crusher has been a staple of the hardrock mining industry since its invention. It is used as a primary crusher for all types of ores. The jaw typically takes the larger run of mine product and produces a sized discharge for feed to a secondary crusher such as a cone crusher, ball mill, or hammer mill. We have sold our jaw crushers to many different industries over the years, but the hard rock mining industry is still the #1 purchaser of our jaw crushers.

The hammer mill or ball mill takes the <3/4 discharge from the jaw crusher and pulverizes it to liberate the values in the ore (usually gold), and one of them is a component of our Turn-Key Ore Processor. The size of the powder from a hammer mill is controlled by the size of the openings in the screen, and the discharge is processed on the shaker table. The hammer mill will produce discharge in the 20-30 mesh size. If additional size reduction is needed, a ball mill is a conventional choice instead of the hammer mill. Take a look at the procedure to determine the liberation size for a specific ore type.

If the shaker table tailings are too coarse, they can be classified with a spiral classifier, and the over-sized discharge returned to the ball mill for additional grinding. When concentrating gold ore, our shaker table will get a high percentage of the free gold >325 mesh, even down to less than 400 mesh, equaling or out-performing any table on the market. The shaker table is a component of our Turn-Key Ore Processor and it makes quite clean cuts of <16 mesh slurry between the free gold, sulfides, and tailings. The operator can sell the free gold and send the sulfides to the refiner if they contain additional values.

The spiral classifier separates the shaker table tailings into fine and coarse fractions. The coarse material is directed back to the grinding circuit to liberate more value, and the fine materialis directed to the waste settling pond.

The spiral classifier is also useful as a simple dewatering device when water is in short supply. When the water level in the classifier pool is high, only the very finest of material is discharged from the tank, and the maximum amount of material is augered up the incline, draining the water as it climbs to the upper discharge point.

The MBMMLLC Turn-Key Ore Processor is made up of several modules and provides the operator with a reasonably priced, automated system to recover values with little operator involvement. The ore is loaded at the front end with a bucket and the gold and values-bearing sulfides are recovered off the shaker table. These are offered in 1, 2, and 4-5 ton/hr models.

For the small scale miner, these are the most cost effective, industrial grade processors available for continuous operation. The jaw crusher, hammer mill and fine gold shaker table form the heart of the processor.

For the small scale miner, these are the most cost effective, industrial grade processors available for continuous operation. The jaw crusher, hammer mill and fine gold shaker table form the heart of the processor.

We bought a turn-key ore processing system that included a hammer mill. The equipment did exactly what it was promoted to do and more. The combination of the jaw crusher with the hammer mill and shaker table did has good if not better than it was advertised by MBMM. I Read More

We have an MBMM 24 x 16 HD turnkey-scrap metal processor. We primarily process 6-8lb motor stators, smaller transformers and radiator ends to separate out the clean copper. We run this hard day after day and are very happy with how it performs and the on-going support from MBMM. This Read More

As a countertop fabricator, stone waste from the edges of the slabs is a constant headache and expense to deal with. We dispose of 5,000 lbs of cut-offs a day and the dumpster fees for disposal was getting out of hand. We purchased a crusher system from MBMM and have Read More

This customer reports they process mostlyPC boards populated with components and sell the concentrated mix of copper, base metals and precious metals to a copper refinery in Poland. Read More

The crusher (16 x 24 Jaw Crusher Module) is great! I probably have 300 hours on it and we are in the process of swapping around jaw plates. I am very impressed with your product and would have no hesitation in recommending you guys. Read More

gold mining equipment

gold mining equipment

911MPE hassmall gold mining equipment for sale andmore specifically mineral processing equipment. Our equipment is best used in small scale extractive metallurgyoperations operated by small miners or hobbyist prospectors and mining fanatics. 911MPE offers gold mining equipment as well as processing equipment applicable to most any base metals: copper, lead, zinc, nickel, tin, tungsten and more. For the relatively small size of equipment offered, sample preparation and metallurgical laboratories can economically buy good alternatives to the usually unaffordable equipment for sale in the classic market place.

911MPE has for target market what mining professionals consider the pilot-plant scale mining operation or artisanal mining operations with a focus around under 500TPD. Metals you can extract include: gold, silver or other of the precious group as well as the classic base metals; copper, lead, zinc, nickel, molybdenum. Much of our ultra-small scale equipment allows you to process from just a few kilo (pounds) per day and work on your passion for a small budget.

You can buy from us mineral processing equipment starting from crushing, grinding, classification, dredging, gravity separation, flotation, pumps, water treatment and smelting. A line of ovens, furnaces and laboratory equipment is also available.

Making a complete list of gold mining equipment starts with defining the type of gold mining you are doing and the budget you have at your disposal. The type of mining relates to hard rock,eluvial, or placer; alluvial deposits. The capital budget you have to invest in buying your equipment with dictate the scale at which you want to mine and influence the long-term operating costs of your mining operation.

Since most of the information online provides lists of gold mining equipment for amateur level mining with equipment like: gold pans, metal detectors, mini sluice box, blue bowl, geologist rock pick, soil scoop, hand screens/classifiers. The items listed just now fall closer to gold prospecting tools and equipment than actual mining.

I will present here what I consider are major equipment lists for 3 types of mining operations. Remember now, a metallurgist is writing. This will not be flawless and since my speciality is process equipment, that is mostly what will be discussed.

Some amateur level gold prospecting equipment such as metal detectors are often classified as mining equipment by small miners/prospectors operating as a hobby. These items include but are not limited to:

shaker tables - mt baker mining and metals

shaker tables - mt baker mining and metals

MBMM produces high-performance shaker tables for gravity separation based on different material densities. They are designed for maximum performance by combining the best of many proven designs, refined after many hundreds of hours of R&D. The most notable feature is from an old 1909 Deister patent: a ramp and plateau system built into the table top, featuring excellent separation between high-density material, lower density material, and waste products.

The table design minimizes turbulence in the slurry as it flows across the table. Low turbulence means a higher recovery of even the finest gold. We know of no gravity recovery system that beats our proven ability to capture 95% of the gold to 325 mesh (50 microns) or less.

Using the plateau design, only the densest material climbs the grooves in the ramp, is cleaned, and reports to the high grade discharge. Less dense, higher volume material (as in sulfides in gold ore) forms a band at the base of the ramp, reporting to the middlings tray. The lightest material stays behind and reports to the tailings tray.

Other design features of the table were added to minimize turbulence, hence higher fine gold recovery to <325 mesh. Sloped grooves are machined into the rubber top, replacing high-turbulence riffles. There is a smooth back and forth motion to move the material across the table without bumps or jerks. Adjustable water flow helps control the separation of various density components. The table is easy to operate and very forgiving for the new user.

We bought a turn-key ore processing system that included a hammer mill. The equipment did exactly what it was promoted to do and more. The combination of the jaw crusher with the hammer mill and shaker table did has good if not better than it was advertised by MBMM. I Read More

We have an MBMM 24 x 16 HD turnkey-scrap metal processor. We primarily process 6-8lb motor stators, smaller transformers and radiator ends to separate out the clean copper. We run this hard day after day and are very happy with how it performs and the on-going support from MBMM. This Read More

As a countertop fabricator, stone waste from the edges of the slabs is a constant headache and expense to deal with. We dispose of 5,000 lbs of cut-offs a day and the dumpster fees for disposal was getting out of hand. We purchased a crusher system from MBMM and have Read More

This customer reports they process mostlyPC boards populated with components and sell the concentrated mix of copper, base metals and precious metals to a copper refinery in Poland. Read More

The crusher (16 x 24 Jaw Crusher Module) is great! I probably have 300 hours on it and we are in the process of swapping around jaw plates. I am very impressed with your product and would have no hesitation in recommending you guys. Read More

gold mining equipment | gold wash plant for sale - jxsc mining

gold mining equipment | gold wash plant for sale - jxsc mining

The gold mining equipment includes: jaw crusher, hammer crusher, roller crusher, impact crusher, vertical crusher, cone crusher, ball mill, vibrating screen, spiral separator, flotation machine, mining agitation tank, ore feeder, concentrator, mine hoist, mining conveyor belt, pre-watering into a ball plate, spiral chute, beneficiation shaker, washing machine and other equipment.

After the first stage crushing process, the ore material enters the double-layer vibrating screen, the crushed upper layer material with middle layer material enters the second crushing stage, the outlet material from the first crushing stage and the second crushing stage into the screening procedure. The screened material is ground by the first stage ball mill, a closed circuit grinding system is composed of the ball mill and the classifier. The staged overflow is classified by the cyclone and then enters the second-stage ball mill for re-grinding, and then forms a closed-circuit grinding with the cyclone. The gold-plating equipment cyclone overflow firstly performs preferential flotation, and the foam products are subjected to secondary selection and a three-time selection to become concentrate products. After the preferential flotation, the tailings undergo a rough selection, a selection, and two The selection process of three selections, three selections, and one sweeping, one selected tailings and one sweeping foam product enter the cyclone for re-classification, re-selection, secondary selection and one fine The selection constitutes a closed-circuit selection, and the three selections and the second selection constitute a closed-circuit selection.

Gravity beneficiation is an ore dressing method which according to mineral density and plays an important role in contemporary mineral processing methods. The gravity separation equipment includes spiral chutes, shaker tables, jigs and short cone cyclones.

1. Mercury amalgamation-gravity separation This process involves gravity separation and then mercury amalgamation or mercury amalgamation before gravity separation. The former method is mostly used for the placer gold which with low gold content, or the surface contaminated ore. The latter is mostly used for the quartz vein gold-bearing sulfide ore. 2. Gravity separation (amalgamation)-cyanide process This gold processing method is suited for the quartz vein type gold-bearing oxidized ore which with uneven disseminated grain size and high oxidation degree, the gold-bearing ore basically free of copper, arsenic, antimony, etc. 3. Flotation process This processing method is suitable for the quartz vein gold-bearing ore, gold-bearing altered rock type ore and sulfides ore which with fine gold particle and good floatability, widely applied in the medium-large good mining plant. 4. Gravity separation (amalgamation)-flotation process This procedure is applicable to the uneven disseminated grain size and low sulfur quartz veins containing gold ore. Since the monomer-dissociated gold is recovered in a timely and early manner in the grinding circuit, the total recovery of gold can be increased. This process is a widely used process in China's gold plant, in which the recovery rate of gold can reach 30-60%. 5. Cyanidation (full mud cyanidation) process Applicable to gold with a higher emerald grain size, a deeper iron ore-bearing pyrite quartz vein type ore, or a gold-altered diorite-type ore. The ore is required to contain no elements harmful to cyanidation such as copper, arsenic or antimony. 6. Flotation-Cyanide Process This process is suitable for the treatment of gold-bearing iron ore quartz vein ore with gold and sulfide symbiosis. It is also suitable for gold-bearing granite fracture zone altered rock type ore, especially for high sulfur ore. To apply. This process is also one of the common processes in China's gold mines. 7. Flotation-baking-cyanide combined process This procedure is applicable to gold-bearing quartz vein type ores containing elements such as arsenic and antimony. The roasting process is a preparation for cyanidation in order to remove elements that are harmful to cyanidation.

Mining Equipment Manufacturers, Our Main Products: Gold Trommel, Gold Wash Plant, Dense Media Separation System, CIP, CIL, Ball Mill, Trommel Scrubber, Shaker Table, Jig Concentrator, Spiral Separator, Slurry Pump, Trommel Screen.

gold shaking table

gold shaking table

A Gold Shaking Table are basically low-capacity machines used as last step in the gold upgrading process. Theshakingtable is a thin film, shear flow process equipment, that separatesparticlegrains of its feed material based on thedifferences in their specific gravity, density, size and shape. Mineral rich particles, from light to heavy and fine to coarse will be sorted by net effective weight. Finely crushed or ground ore material goes as feed mixed with water to form a pulp (mud) andfed as slurry of an average about 2025% of solids by weight onto the highest point of the table deck. The gold tables deck hasa reciprocal movement along its main axis that is given using a vibrator or an eccentric head motion. The table surface is manufactured and fitted with several tapered strips called riffles or grooves, often made with of yellow pine (way back in time that is), low-density polythene or aluminum surfacing.Shaking tables and other thin film separating plant recover finely divided gold under conditions of subcritical laminar and supercritical laminar regimes of flow, which may occur only where there is a very thin depth of fluid.

Agold shaking tables riffles taper downwards in elevation in the direction the gold (and all heavies), precious metals concentrate discharge end of the table. This facilitates the ease with which mineral particles can move transversal to the tables axis or shaker-line, therefore helpingseparation over the complete tablelength. Riffle heights and pattern designs are selected based on the desired and required duty/function expected.

Preparing several size fractions for tabling is usually achieved in a hydrosizer. Ifgold is present in both coarse and finely divided sizings at least three, or perhapsfour separate size fractions must be treated, each under a different set of operatingconditions. Tables operate most efficiently with a closely sized feed. The slurry fansout across a smooth section of the surface until it reaches the riffles. The lighterand very fine particles are washed over the riffles and moved along the riffles by thereciprocating motion imparted to the deck while the heavier particles are held back. The concentrates of heavy mineral and gold are discharged over the end of thedeck. Tailings are washed over the lower edge and a middlings fraction is taken offbetween the lower edge of the concentrate strip and the higher edge of the tailingstrip.

Wash water usage is dependent upon the particle diameter and varies from aslow as 0.7 m/t/h of solids for slime decks, up to 56 m/t/h for coarse solidsseparation. Coarse fractions are usually treated at feed rates of up to 1 t/h using approximately 15 to 20 mm stroke lengths at around 280 rpm (Wilfley table data). Thestroke lengths of finer fractions are reduced to 915 mm with increased speeds ofup to 325 rpm but, because of the corresponding lower film, thickness capacitiesmay fall to around 0.25 t/h. The inclination of the deck is adjusted during operationusing a hand-operated tilting device. It is important following each adjustment toallow the table operation to settle down before making a fresh adjustment. The correct inclination is reached when the ribbon of concentrates is clearly defined andremains steady.

The extreme sensitivity of water depths and corresponding current depths to obtain F = 1, and the use of stationary tables as primary concentrating units, was probably the main reason for the consistently low (R.E. 6065%) gold recoveries of early dredgers. For such table types, the fluid forces are applied to the stream-beds as a whole and ripples form, which keep the sand in orbital motion and provide for the denser particles to sink to the bed. Deposition is most favoured by anti-dune conditions produced by free-surface flow at or near the supercritical state. Such bed forms are in phase with the water surface and are produced in the rapid flow conditions of Froude Number F = 1. In this state of flow, the bed forms of the upper flow regime are stable. Below F = 1 the flow is tranquil and shear forces are reduced. In reviewing recovery distributions of certaindredgers it wasnoted that some coarse gold reported with the tailing after passing through two stages of tabling and that fine gold did not concentrate noticeably down the line.

I consider the gold shaker table to be a shaking sluice box OR self cleaning sluice as they both essentially are classifiers used as heavy gold concentrating devices. Apart from nuggets; generally the valuable minerals like heavy precious metals like platinumandpalladium thatcan berecovered by tables and sluices, are found in one size range (generally the finest) and the waste minerals in another. On agold sluice, large particles (gravel) travel by sliding and rolling over the riffles, with finer particles travelling by saltation. Sand travels by a combination of modes described earlier with some saltation over the riffles.Very fine particles are maintained in suspension by turbulent and inter-particle collision.

Riffles function properly only if in the space between them and the slurry is sufficiently live (turbulent) to reject the lighter particles, but not so lively that the gold cannot settle. On a gold shaker table, those particles are allowed to settle as they will get transported to the other end by the vibrating/shaking back-and-forth motion. Lower grade, light pieces, will be able to escape the table a the riffles becomes shorter along the tables length.Once the particle has started to move, the coefficient of friction changes to a dynamic coefficient of friction. In fact, because the fluid push on the particles is larger at the top of the particle than at the bottom, the particle rolls, largely according to the shape of the particle and according to the speed. At low speeds, the effective friction is the relatively large coefficient of dynamic sliding friction, and at high speeds it is the lower coefficient of rolling friction. The change probably takes place partly continuously and partly discontinuously. As a first approximation, the dynamic coefficient of friction may, however, be regarded as constant.

In a sluice box, the settling of heavy minerals between the riffles requires frequent stirring to prevent the riffle spaces from blinding. This also disturbs the gold, which then moves progressively down-sluice. Frequent clean-ups are needed to avoid excessive loss. Boxes may be used in parallel to avoid loss of production time. One box is kept in operation while cleaning up in the other.

Effect of Deck Roughness: The foregoing analysis is based on the postulate that the deck is perfectly smooth. If the deck is rough, i.e., if it has at its surface some recesses capable of partly shielding fine particles from the rub of the fluid, the slope required to move the particles by either rolling or sliding will be increased. At the same time such an effect, while present also for large particles, may be so much smaller for them as to be imperceptible. The relationship of critical angle to size obtained above will therefore not hold for rough surfaces. The problem is analytically complex and it is nevertheless a problem that might well be explored further if a full insight is desired into the mechanism of flowing-film concentration.

Adjustments are provided in all tables for the amount of wash water, the cross tilt, the speed, and the length of the stroke. The speed of the table ranges usually from 180 to 270 strokes per minute, and the strokes are from 1/2 to 1 1/2 long.

Variations in character of feed require variations in operation. The operators duty is to take care of them by adjusting the tilt, the wash water, and the position of the splitters that control discharge of table into concentrate, middling, and tailing launders. One man may look after 10 to 100 tables, depending upon the regularity of the feed and the difficulty of the task assigned to the table.

A coarse feed can be treated in larger amounts than a fine feed. It would seem that the treatable tonnage increases at least as the square of the average size (theory indicates that it increases as the cube of the particle size).

A roughing operation is preferably conducted on a fully riffled deck. These decks have a greater capacity because the particles are treated throughout the deck in the form of a teetering suspension many particles deep instead of as a restive layer one particle deep. Such decks do not provide flowing-film concentration but some sort of jigging. On the other hand, a cleaning operation is preferably performed on a partly riffled deck.

It is clear that minerals of different specific gravity must be present the greater the spread in specific gravity between minerals, the greater the capacity since that sort of condition permits crowding without considerable penalty.

The effect of locked particles on capacity of tables should also be recognized. These particles behave in a fashion intermediate between that of pure particles of their constituent minerals. It is as if a three-product separation were sought in which one of the products would guide-in specific gravity between the two other.

Table capacity may be as high as 200 tons per 24 hr. on a fully riffled deck 4 by 12 ft. treating minus 3-mm. sulphide ore having a specific gravity of about 3.0 (roughing duty), or 500 tons per 24 hr. But table capacity may be as low as 5 tons per 24 hr., or even less, for fine ore (minus 0.3 mm.) if there is only a small specific-gravity differential between minerals.

Operating a shaking table is cheap as power requirement per table are typically low. Most of the energy is expended to move the deck, which must therefore be as light as is consistent with rigidity. Laboratory gold shaking table testingreport.

There are a few steps that need to be taken in order to get yourgold shaker table to work efficiently. The first step that aspiring gold miners must take would be to make sure that all four corners of the table are level from forward to back. It is very important to anchor the bolts so that the shaking of the gold goes to the table and not through the frame. After you begin running your table, you may need to adjust your table from side to side to maintain an even flow of materials on both sides of the table.

A gold shaker table contains a water access point where you can fill it with clean water, which can be seen right under the control area. Alternatively you can directly fill the tank of the shaker table with clean water. The water access point allows you to connect a clean water system through a garden hose. The valve that is right behind the tank is then turned off and the pump system is not running during the process of running fresh water. When clean washing water is distributed at the top of the table at right angles, particles are moved diagonally across the deck and separate from each other according to their size and density. During the fast shaking process, you will gradually begin to see the separation of materials. For example, when you have dirt and rocks that contain materials like lead, sulfides and gold, because of the varying weights of these different materials, you will see these materials venture off in different directions on the shaker table. The lead and the sulfides will be carried over to the right side of the table while the pure gold will be carried over to the far left side of the table.

There is one term to remember when professional gold miners describe the actions of a gold shaker table. When professional gold miners say that small particles of gold are being carried through the grooves, they are referring to the ripples that you can plainly see on the shaker table. When they say that there is an overflow of materials like Black Pyrrhotite, White Quartz, silver and gold on the grooves, then this is a good thing.

When materials are washed by the clean water they are supposed to drop into 3 hoppers/launders underneath the table. There is a centre launderthat will gather the purest portions of gold while the two outside launders will gather some gold, though not as much.

It is crucial to remember to plug the cable of your shaker table into a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) outlet. Most shaker tables will not work if they are plugged into any other kind of outlet.

In aPercussion Gold Shaker Table,the work of keeping the pulp in a state of agitation, done by the rakes or brushes in the German and Cornish buddies described above, is affected by sudden blows or bumps imparted sideways or endways to the table. The table is made of wood or sheet metal, the surface being either smooth or riffled.

End-bump tables are hung by chains or in some similar manner, so as to be capable of limited movement, and receive a number of blows delivered on the upper end. These blows are given by cams acting through rods, or else the table is pushed forward against the action of strong springs by cams on a revolving shaft, and then being suddenly released is thrown back violently by the springs against a fixed horizontal beam. The movement of the pulp depends on the inertia of the particles, which are thrown backward up the inclined table by the blow given to the table, the amount of movement varying with their mass, and depending, therefore, both on their size and density. The vibrations produced by the percussion also perform the work of the rakes in destroying the cohesion between the particles, and a stream of water washes them down. The result is that the larger and heavier particles may be made to travel up the table in the direction in which theyare thrown by the blow, by regulating the quantity of water, while the smaller and lighter particles are carried down. These machines yield only two classes of material, headings and tailings. One such machine, the Gilpin County Gilt Edge Concentrator was devised in Colorado, and has displaced the blanket sluices atalmost all the mills at Blackhawk. It consists (Fig. 46) essentially of a cast-iron or copper table, 7 feet long and 3 feet wide, divided into two equal sections by a 4-inch square bumping-beam. The table has raised edges, and its inclination is about 4 inches in 5 feet at its lower end, the remaining 1 feet at the head having a somewhat steeper grade. The table is hung by iron rods to an iron frame, the length of the rods being altered by screw threads, so as to regulate the inclination to the required amount. A shaft with double cams, A, making 65 revolutions per minute, enables 130 blows per minute to be given to the table in the following manner; onbeing released by the cam, the table is forced forward by the strong spring, B, so that its head strikes against the solid beam,C, which is firmly united to the rest of the frame.

The pulp coming from the copper plates is fed on to the table near its upper end by a distributing box, D, and is spread out and kept in agitation by the rapid blows. Thesulphides settle to the bottom of the pulp, and are thrown forward by the shock, and eventually discharged over the head of the table at the left hand of the figure, while the gangue is carried down by the water and discharged at the other end. One machine is enough to concentrate the pulp from five stamps. If the table consists of amalgamated copper plates, it is of some use for catching free gold also, treating about 8 cwts. of ore per hour. This machine is not so effective in saving slimed pyrites as the Wilfley table or the vanners.

Gold shaker tables are environmentally friendly (chemical free) for recovering pure gold as they can play an important part in reducing the use of mercury by gold miners. With gold shaker tables miners dont need to resort to mercury amalgamation or cyanide to recover gold. The filter will constantly need to be removed and cleaned as it will get dirty even after using the table a few times.

Miners can design and construct a basic shaking table out of cheap materials that are affordable in local stores, including a drive mechanism that contains bicycle gears, chains and rubber bands that are made from car tire inner tubes. The drive mechanism for a gold shaker table can be a hand crank or it can contain parts of a motorcycle frame and engine. If one prefers to use a motor for his or her table, either an electric motor or a motor that runs on diesel fuel would be the ideal options.

It is important to keep in mind that there is no one specific way to create your own gold shaker table system. Many professional gold mining organizations will create tables of different shapes and sizes to cater to the needs of their customers. Some shaker table systems will feature machines that can crush hard rocks, which are referred to as jaw crushers. The speeds of shaker table systems will vary as they can shake from hundreds to thousands of pounds of materials per hour.

gold wash plant for sale

gold wash plant for sale

Using a gold wash plant, exposed gold-bearing gravels are mined using a bulldozer that pushes and stockpiles the gravel near a wash plant. The stockpiled gold-bearing gravel is then fed into the wash plant by a front-end loader or large backhoe. This practice promotes equipment efficiency by allowing the bulldozer to continue mining while the loader or backhoe feeds the wash plant at a steady rate. When the mined gravel is fed into the washplant. It is classified by particle size using various stationary or vibrating screens. Classifying gravels provides for more efficient gold recovery, reduced water consumption, and facilitation of mine site rehabilitation, and is practiced by most operators. The oversize material, usually larger than two inches, slides out of the washplant into a pile where it can be moved by a front-end loader or bulldozer. The undersize material and gold-bearing gravel is mixed with water and flows through the sluicebox where the gold and heavy black sands are concentrated. Tailings are gravel, sand, and other materials accumulated at the end of the sluicebox. Tailings are routinely moved away from the sluicebox by a loader or bulldozer.

The water that carries the gold-bearing gravel through the sluicebox becomes sediment-laden and turbid. This muddy process water flows from the end of the sluicebox over a pile of fresh tailings into a series of settling ponds. These ponds are designed to hold the muddy water long enough for the fine sediments to settle. The physical design of the ponds depends upon the amount of water flowing through the system, the sediment characteristics of the gravels being worked, and the physical characteristics of the site. Most mines use a series of small settling ponds to permit more flexible water management. Small ponds are usually easier to build, repair, dean, replace, bypass, and rehabilitate than larger ponds. The use of pre-settling ponds is encouraged. A pre-settling pond is located in the tail race between the sluice and the first settling pond. Sands and other heavy settleable solids are collected here where they are easy to wash.

However, some zero-discharge systems do have occasional discharges, usually due to water seepage through pond dikes. This seepage almost always meets the settleable solids effluent standards, and in most cases, Is probably of better quality than the water discharged from typically operated settling ponds. I.e., less settleable solids and lower turbidity. Carefully designed and Implemented water management practices are required to achieve zero discharge of muddy water into adjacent streams. Water used in the sluicing process Is pumped from the nearby stream through the washplant and into the settling ponds. Water Intake from the stream Is suspended when the ponds contain adequate water to support continued sluicing operations by recycling pond water to the washplant. In some cases, groundwater seepage Into the settling ponds may be sufficient to eliminate the need for adding stream water to the system. The practice of zero discharge and the recycling of mine water contributes to compliance with federal effluent limitations and State water quality standards.

Placer mining involves equipment ranging from a simple gold pan all the way up to trucks, excavators, and a gold wash plant.This type of gold prospecting usually involves less investment and will consistently yield small amounts of gold, with occasional bonanzas for those who are persistent. If you can learn to reliably return from every trip with decent concentrates, so that over time you fill a five-gallon bucket, and then maybe even a fifty-five-gallon drum, with black sands, magnetite, ilmenite, rare earth elements (REEs), and gold, you will be rewarded in the long run.

Either way, your long-term goals are your own.Very few prospectors are simply in it for the money, looking at this as a way to become a millionaire overnight. Some of us just like to get out of town, camp in the mountains, and enjoy the spirit of the outdoors. Some people like to work up a little sweat and appetite, improve their health, and learn a little. Some of us like to solve problems and run machinery, and enjoy the challenge of keeping a pump going or making sure the sluice is running right. Still others like the wildlife, the scenery, and the historical importance of the Wild West, and bring back their riches as photos and videos. In each case, if you toss in a little gold fever as motivation and stay scientific about your sampling and exploration, you will prosper far and above the value of your recovered material.

Still, a nice payday is always a treat. One sure way to reach that goal is to keep trying. Keep practicing, keep exploring, and keep getting out in the field. Another truism that seems to hold is that the farther away from civilization you get. the better your chances.

The development of a load/placer mine and the selection of the proper gravity recovery plant is more difficult than most people realize. Television shows have glamorized mining making it look like anybody can start a mine with little to no experience. What people dont realize is that mining is a structured engineering discipline taught at university. Just as you should not build your own bridge without knowledge of civil engineering, you should not think becoming a miner is a simple task. If you have no experience in the mining field you need to get educated about the process before you embark on this adventure. We have compiled a basic guide to assist in that process.

The terminology used for this type of mining is often interchanged. The term for the type of deposit under consideration is alluvial. Alluvial deposits are formed when the gold has migrated from its original deposition by weathering to a new location often inactive stream beds or in historic watercourses now overlain by sediments or glacial sediments.

In general Placer Mining is typically the recovery of gold from stream sediments through the use of dredges and sluices or other gravity means. Load mining generally involves the stripping of an overburden layer (soil) to uncover the underlying gravels that contain the gold. These deposits are often mined with mobile equipment and the ore trucked to a gravity treatment plant.

1. Permitting am I allowed to disturb the land excavating pits, leaving tailings behind, water usage, noise, air quality. In most cases you are not allowed to simply start mining even on your own land without the proper permits.

2. Resource estimation how much gold is present (grade and tonnage) and what does the deposit look like over burden depth, ore depth, gravel size. Generally, a placer resource is established by drilling or augering holes around the deposit to delineate the extent of the gold. This is often combined with field gravity recovery testing to provide an estimate of the recoverable grade.

6. Mine plan do you have a mine plan where are you going to mine first, where is the overburden going to be placed, where are the tailings going to be placed, is the plant going to be in one spot or moved during the mine life, what are the haulage distances. Is this a seasonal operation?

Mine Conditions Where is your project located? terrain, climate, infrastructure variables How large is your concession? Is a mobile or fixed plant right for this application? How many yards/hour (m/hr or tons per hour) do you want to process? How much water do you have available (GPM or m/hr)? Is there power available from the grid or do you required generation?

Plant Characteristics Are you looking for a mobile machine that you move regularly or a stationary plant that you haul your ore to? What type/size of equipment will you be feeding the plant with (front end loader, dredge pump, other)?

Feed Characteristics Ore consistency: What is the estimated maximum boulder size (in, mm)? Is there significant clay present? What is your maximum gold size (mm or um)? Is there fine gold present, what is the typical size (um)?

8. Economic Model Once you have made some initial assumptions you need to develop an economic model (even a basic one) so that you know if the project is viable before you start. No matter what type of project you should try and establish some basic economics unless this is just going to be a small hobby operation where profit does not matter. There are a lot of assumptions required to develop the model and you need to be realistic in your assessment. Add contingencies for operating costs of 10-15% and 20-30% for capital costs.

gold shaker tables

gold shaker tables

911Metallurgist is a recognized supplier of high-quality shaker tables that are precision-made to produce the best gravity separation. Our team of experienced engineers manufactures and assembles our tables at the suppliers factory site where the machines are built to very high standards under strict quality control conditions. The tables are constructed of the highest quality materials on the market and have been tried and tested in the field over many decades. Shaking tables provide the most efficient gravity separation of sub 2mm materials. With over a century of use concentrating minerals, 911Metallurgist units have proved themselves as the market leaders. 911Metallurgist customers are currently using tables to produce concentrates of gold (alluvial and milled ore), tin, tungsten, tantalum, and chromite, where the tables are usually used as the final stage in gravity circuits.

The most generally accepted explanation of the action of a concentrating shaker table is that as the material to be treated is fanned out over the shaker table deck by the differential motion and gravitational flow, the particles become stratified in layers behind the riffles. This stratificaton is followed by the removal of successive layers from the top downward by cross-flowing water as the stratified bed travels toward the outer end of the table. The cross-flowing water is made up partly of water introduced with the feed and partly of wash water fed separately through troughs along the upper side of the table. The progressive removal of material from the top toward the bottom of the bed is the result of the taper of the shaker table riffles toward their outer end, which allows successively deeper layer of material to be carried away by the cross-flowing water as the outer end of the shaker table is approached. By the time the end of the shaker table is reached only a thin layer, probably not thicker than one or two particles, remains on the surface of the deck, this being finally discharged over the end of the table.

The physical and mechanical principles involved in the concentrating action of a shaker table are somewhat more complicated than this explanation implies. Mathematical calculations and experimental data are extremely usefulin studying these principles, but they tell only a part of the story and do not explain the highly efficient separations that tables are known to be capable of making.

Unless the shaker table feed contains a considerable percentage of bone gold and other material of specific gravities intermediate between that of rock and gold, extremely high tabling efficiencies may be expected. If a shaker table could be operated on feed consisting of nothing but a mixture of individual gold and slate particles with a size range of approximately -in. to 48 mesh, an almost perfect separation would be obtainable even on an unclassified feed. With such a feed a well-operated shaker table would probably recover not less than 98 per cent of the gold while eliminating not less than 95 per cent of the slate. This implies almost perfect stratification according to specific gravity without regard to particle size, and it is improbable that it could be attained entirely as a result of the motion of the deck and the flow of water in a plane parallel to the deck surface.The question then arises as to what the other forces or factors are that might contribute significantly to the efficiency of the separation on a table.

As far as is known, no exhaustive studies have ever been made of the principles involved in shaker table concentration by either ore-dressing or gold-preparation engineers. Bird and Davis probably have given more attention to the subject than anyone else, but their experimental work was of a preliminary nature. It was done on minus 4-mesh raw gold and on synthetic mixtures of various products derived from this raw gold by screen sizing and sink-and-float fractionations. They used an apparatus which they called a stratifier. This was a channel-shaped box 12 ft. long, 5 in. deep and 1 in. wide, inside measurements. It was suitably mounted with one end attached to an eccentric and pitman. Stratification experiments were made by filling the box with gold and water and running it at a speed of 360 strokes per minute with the eccentric set to give -in. stroke. The amount of water used was sufficient to permit complete mobility in the bed during the operation of the stratifier. At the end of each run, after the water had been allowed to drain off, one side wall of the stratifier was removed and cross-section samples were taken of the bed to determine by screen-sizing and sink-and-float tests to what extent stratification had been accomplished. Bird and Davis say that their aim is to bring out the fact that stratification, contrary to the common brief, will not account for the separation effected by the gold-washing table, and that cross-flowing water, in addition to removing the top strata found on the table, must also have an important selective action in completing the separation according to specific gravity, both in the upper and in the lower strata found between riffles.

The theory of Bird and Davis as to the selective action of the crossflowing water is that only a part of the water flows over the top of the bed between riffles; the remainder flows through interstices in the bed. These interstices are comparatively large near the top of the bed but become progressively smaller toward the bottom, thus forming in effect V-shaped troughs. In this way the water currents would be relatively swift near the top of the bed and become progressively slower toward the bottom. According to Bird and Davis, With paths for the water such that the top strata are subjected to relatively swift currents and the lower strata are subjected to progressively slower currents, the separation actually occurring on the shaker table can be explained. As the coarse particles at the top receive swift currents and each successively finer size at the lower levels receives slower currents, the velocity of the water matches the size of materials comprising the different strata. Under these conditions a separation occurs in the lower strata similar to that in the top strata, only it takes place more slowly. The slow currents of water within the bed carry the fine gold particles along from riffle to riffle, at a more rapid rate than they do the fine bone and shale particles.

Although stratification due to the nearly horizontal action of the shaker table deck and the flow of water in a plane parallel to it is probably not sufficient to account entirely for the separation made by a table, it is, nevertheless, the fundamental principle of the shaker table just as hindered settling is the fundamental principle of a jig. Although these processes are of diametrically opposite characteristics, there is some possibility that a shaker table may utilize to a minor extent the hindered-settling principle. For convenience in this discussion, the stratification due to the more or less horizontal action of the shaker table deck and flow of water will be referred to as shaker table stratification. This type of stratification is illustrated by the separation that takes place when a box of large and small marbles is shaken and agitated in a horizontal plane in such a way that the large and small marbles collect into separate layers. It is a familiar phenomenon that the small marbles will collect in a layer on the bottom while the large marbles collect in a top layer. The principle of hindered settling can be illustrated by placing a mixture of large and small marbles in an upright cylinder of suitable size with a perforated-plate bottom. If water of sufficient volume and pressure is forced upward through the perforated plate so as to keep the marbles in teeter for a short interval, the marbles will separate into layers, with all the large marbles in the bottom layer and all the small ones on top. The separation is the reverse of that obtained by shaker table stratification. In these illustrations of stratification and hindered settling it is assumed that the marbles are all of the same specific gravity regardless of size. If some marbles have higher specific gravities than others the effect will be to increase their tendency to settle toward the bottom, regardless of whether this tendency favors or opposes the stratification or hindered-settling action. The heavier the small marbles, the easier the separation by shaker table stratification and the more difficult by hindered settling. Conversely, the heavier the large marbles, the more difficult the separation by shaker table stratification and the easier by hindered settling.

In line with principles referred to above, complete separation according to specific gravity could hardly occur on a shaker table or in any other concentrating device as a result of either shaker table stratification by itself or hindered settling by itself when the material to be separated consists of particles varying a great deal in both size and specific gravity. In gold washing the aim is to separate gold particles from particles of refuse according to specific gravity without reference to size of particles, as the ash content of a particle is almost directly proportional to its specific gravity. This separation can be accomplished more effectively by utilizing a combination of shaker table stratification and hindered settling than by relying on either of these two alone, and it is quite conceivable that both processes actually do play a part in the operation of a concentrating table.

To explain how a certain degree of hindered settling might occur on a table, we must assume, as Bird and Davis did, that although a part of the water flows across the top of the bed the remainder of it flows through interstices in the bed itself between adjacent riffles. This seems to be a reasonable assumption and it is one that is also made by Taggart in his discussion of the theory of shaker table concentration. The cross flow of water from one riffle to the next might be somewhat as illustrated in Fig. 8, in which a-b is a line along the surface of the deck perpendicular to the riffles, and C and D are two successive riffles. If the bed is kept in a mobile condition between riffles by the motion of the table, and if the water flows from riffle to riffle approximately as indicated in Fig. 8, it is quite probable that to a certain degree a hindered-settling effect is attained along the upper side of each riffle in a zone indicated by the arrows in Fig. 8. Although the effect of hindered-settling along any individual riffle might be relatively slight, the cumulative effect along the entire series of riffles across the width of the deck might be of sufficient magnitude to influence materially the character of the shaker table separation.

We should expect a hindered-settling effect to be very beneficial as an ally to stratification on a table. The weak point about shaker table stratification is that it tends to deposit all fines at the bottom of the bed, even fine gold of low specific gravity. This fine gold, after penetrating to the surface of the deck, would be guided toward the refuse end by the riffles and would tend to go into the refuse if it were not brought to the top of the bed by some means or other and then carried over the riffles by the cross flow of water and subsequently discharged with the washed gold. Bringing the fine gold to the surface is a function that hindered settling would accomplish very effectively, as one of the fundamentals of hindered settling is that it brings the light, fine particles to the top of the bed. As far as the coarse particles of gold are concerned, evidently they are brought to the surface by stratification and started on their way to the washed-gold side of the shaker table by the cross flow almost instantly after the feed strikes the deck. Anyone who has operated a gold-washing shaker table is familiar with the rapidity of this separation and the way in which it causes all light, reasonably coarse gold particles to be discharged from a rather narrow zone at the head-motion end.

If the suppositions in the foregoing paragraph are correct, the process of separation of gold and refuse on a shaker table may be summarized as follows: Almost immediately after the feed strikes the table, sufficient stratification takes place to bring all coarse, light particles of gold and possibly some coarse particles of refuse to the top of the bed. The cross flow of water carries the coarse gold particles across to the gold-discharge side very rapidly, whereas any coarse particles of refuse at the top of the bed are carried toward the refuse end much more rapidly by the differential motion of the shaker table than they can be transported transversely by the cross flow of water. After removal of the coarse gold, and as the bed progresses diagonally across the table, the shaker table stratification action brings medium-sized gold particles to the surface, and these are removed across the tapering riffles by the wash water. The tapering riffles and continuous removal of material by the cross flow causes the bed to become thinner and thinner toward the refuse end. When the point is reached where the thickness of the bed is less than that of the coarse refuse particles, these particles stick up through the surface of the bed and the transverse pressure exerted on them by the cross flow is diminished, as their surfaces are only partly exposed to this flow. This helps to keep them on their course toward the end of the shaker table and prevents them from being transported by the water in the same direction as the medium-sized gold. Toward the outer end of the riffles the extremely fine gold is being brought to the surface by a hindered-settling action immediately behind each successive riffle. Since the material subjected to this action consists of light, fine particles of gold and heavy refuse of a much larger average particle size, the action should be particularly effective in bringing the fine gold to the surface and allowing it to be carried off into the washed gold by the wash water.

This explanation presumes that to some extent there is a greater opportunity for hindered-settling conditions toward the outer end of each riffle than near the head-motion end. Although this presumption may be questionable, it is possible that, as the bed becomes thinner, a greater proportion of the water follows a coarse along the surface of the deck and contributes to the upward current required for hindered-settling conditions as each riffle is encountered.

In this discussion of shaker table principles shape of particle has been disregarded because it is believed that, as a rule, this is not an important factor in the gold-tabling process. Almost invariably the gold particles are somewhat more cubicle and less platy or flaky than refuse particles, but there is little evidence to show that refuse particles of one particular shape are more difficult to separate on a shaker table than those of some other shape. As for the gold, the shape of particles in sizes suitable for tabling are pretty much alike in all golds. Yancey made a study of the effect of shape of particle. He decided that, for the gold he used in his study, shape of particle is a factor of minor importance in tabling this unsized gold, in so far as the over-all efficiency of the process is concerned. Size and, of course, specific-gravity difference are the major factors.

Of considerably more importance than shape of particle is the particle-size factor. It is evident from the nature of stratification and hindered settling that the separation of gold from refuse becomes more difficult as the range of sizes to be treated in one operation increases. The increasing difficulty as the size range increases is apparent from the following considerations: Assume that we are dealing with two minerals, one of high and one of low specific gravity, and that a mixture of 10-mesh particles of the two minerals will separate readily into two layers by either shaker table stratification or hindered settling, one layer containing all the light particles and the other layer all the heavy particles. Now, if we add two more sizes of heavy particles to the mixture, say 8-mesh and 14-mesh particles, obviously, according to the principles of stratification and hindered settling, the separation by either process into two layers according to the specific gravities of the two minerals will be somewhat more difficult than with the original mixture of nothing but 10-mesh particles. The greater the number of sizes of heavy mineral added to the mixture, the more difficult will be the separation. This reasoning applies likewise to the particles of the light mineral, and it all sums up to the fact that if a shaker table feed contains too wide a range of sizes some of the sizes will be cleaned inefficiently.

In actual practice there is no objection to a considerable variety of sizes in the feed; in fact, if all particles were of the same size there might be some disadvantages, because the bed would be less mobile and less fluid and conditions within the bed would be less favorable for efficient separation than when there is some variety of sizes. For efficient shaker table operation, however, it is important to guard against having too wide a range of sizes in the feed.

In the use of tables in gold preparation, the importance of correct operating conditions can hardly be overemphasized. It is a peculiarity of tables that they give excellent results when correct operating conditions are maintained, but with conditions upset and unbalanced the results are likely to be as far on the bad side as they were on the good side under favorable conditions. This is especially true if the washing problem is somewhat difficult. Naturally, when there is an almost complete absence of bony material in the shaker table feed and the problem is mainly one of separating low-ash gold from slate and other rock, fair results may be obtained even under haphazard operating conditions; but if the washing problem is at all difficult the results are likely to be either extremely good or extremely bad, depending on whether or not correct operating conditions are adhered to. Some of the factors on which operating conditions are dependent will be discussed briefly.

It is a comparatively simple matter to build foundations substantial enough so that they will not have a tendency to shake or vibrate as a result of the motion of the tables. A reinforced-concrete slab need not be more than 6 or 7 in. thick to provide a perfectly rigid foundation, even at a considerable height above the ground, if properly supported on reinforced concrete pillars. It is important to provide tables with substantial, rigid foundations that will not deteriorate after a few years of service. Even a slight shaking or vibrating motion in the foundations is likely to interfere with the action of the tables and lead to serious loss of shaker table efficiency.

One of the first essentials for successful shaker table operation is uniform flow of gold and water to the table. The significance of a steady, uniform feed is apparent from a consideration of the mechanical process involved in the shaker table separation of gold from refuse. The material fed to a shaker table spreads out in a fan-shaped bed. This bed covers virtually the entire shaker table deck. Along the outer edges of the bed at the points of discharge the refuse has separated from the gold and discharges over the end of the shaker table while the gold discharges over the side, assuming that the corner of the shaker table is the dividing point between gold and refuse. However, the amount of material discharging over the side of the shaker table in proportion to that discharged over the end will vary if the rate of feed varies and other conditions remain constant. For instance, if a shaker table is set to give highly efficient results with a feed of 7 tons per hour of a given gold, it will discharge approximately the correct percentage by weight over the refuse end as refuse. If the feed is decreased by several tons per hour, however, without any compensating adjustments being made, a larger percentage of the total material is likely to discharge over the refuse end. This means an unnecessary loss of gold and a low shaker table efficiency. If the feed should be increased by several tons per hour the reverse of this probably would happen, with a certain amount of refuse going into the washed gold and raising its ash content.

Variations in feed rate also affect adversely the conditions for separation of gold from refuse within the bed itself. For instance, for any particular setting of the shaker table when a given gold is treated there is an optimum thickness of bed and an optimum ratio of water to solids in the feed that should be observed when high shaker table efficiency is important. The process of separating particles of refuse from particles of gold cannot be highly efficient except under these optimum conditions, and it is quite obvious that if the feed rate decreases it will tend to decrease the thickness of the bed in certain areas on the table, and the ratio of water to solids will change, as the amount of feed water and wash water are usually more or less independent of the tonnage of solids in the feed. Such interference with the actual separating function of the shaker table is likely to cause an incomplete separation.

With further reference to optimum separating conditions within the bed itself, it is important to maintain always the right kind of distributionthe term distribution in this connection referring to the shaker table distribution of the material with which the constantly moving bed on the shaker table is maintained. The shaker table distribution should be such that the quantity of solids discharged per unit length along the side of the shaker table decreases gradually from the head-motion end toward the refuse end. It should be observed in qualification of this statement, however, that it is usually advantageous to have the washed-gold discharge start at a point a foot or so away from the cornerthat is, the corner directly across from the feed box. Usually there is a large volume of water discharging from this corner zone, but ordinarily it is preferable to have almost no solids discharging with it. Beginning at the end of this corner zone, however, there should be a very heavy discharge of washed gold in the first 3 or 4 ft., and the amount discharged from each successive zone from there to the corner at the refuse end should decrease gradually. There should be some discharge of solids virtually all the way to the corner, but as the corner is reached the discharge should be almost zero. Under these conditions there will always be some refuse material discharging immediately around the corner, but the amount of refuse from the first 6 or 8 in. next to the corner on the refuse end should be negligible in quantity. The bulk of the refuse should discharge over a zone of considerable width, starting not less than 1 or 2 ft. up from the corner.

Although this more or less ideal distribution is fairly easy to attain with an average raw-gold feed, it may be more difficult of attainment with a type of feed in which there is an abnormally high percentage of refuse, especially if the refuse consists mostly of high-ash bone gold. This condition often is encountered in the re-treatment of middlings from primary stages of washing.

However, regardless of the character of the feed, the nearer this ideal distribution is approached, the better the results will be. Once the correct balance between shaker table adjustments and the volume of feed gold, feed water, and wash water has been found, good distribution will maintain itself automatically as long as none of the operating factors are allowed to change. It is self-evident, however, that an increase or decrease in the amount of water going to the tableeither feed water or wash waterwill upset this distribution just as quickly as a change in the feed tonnage unless other compensating adjustments are made.

It is of paramount importance, therefore, to have a feed system that will eliminate as far as possible fluctuations or variations in the rate at which gold and water are fed to the table. With regard to the gold, not only the quantity but also the quality and physical characteristics should be kept constant. This is true particularly with reference to the size distribution of the feed. Any change in size distribution, such as may result from segregation in an improperly designed bin ahead of the tables, can upset the distribution of the material on the tables. The only sure way to get a steady feed is to feed the gold to the shaker table by means of a positive-type feeder, such as a belt, screw conveyor, apron feeder, or rotary star or paddle feeder. A sliding gate device instead of mechanical feeders is almost certain to be unsatisfactory, even when a water line can be placed inside the gate to keep the material moving. The mechanical feeders should be provided with variable-speed drive for adjusting the feed to the desired tonnage. This adjustment cannot be made satisfactorily by varying the size of the opening through which the gold discharges onto the feeder. The feed bin should be of such size and design as to eliminate segregation as far as possible. Any attempt to dispense with feed bins is likely to result in unsatisfactory operating conditions, although it is being done at many plants. A customary practice, for instance, is to draw a middling product from a set of jigs and after dewatering run it through a crusher directly to the tables. Such procedure nearly always provides a variable feed for the tables whereas a constant feed could be obtained by dropping the discharge from the crusher into a bin and having mechanical feeders between the bin and the tables.

Changes in the size distribution of a feed are sometimes caused by difficulties in the dry screening of run-of-mine gold. If dry screening is used and the amount of surface moisture in the run-of-mine gold varies, a finer shaker table feed will be produced when the gold is excessively moist than when it is dry. Naturally, particles near the upper size limit will go through the screen readily if the gold is dry whereas if the gold is wet these particles are likely to go into the oversize. The resultant variation in the size character of the feed can interfere with shaker table efficiency as readily as segregation in the bin. Wet screening eliminates this difficulty.

In connection with the problem of segregation and variations in the size-consist of shaker table feed, a comparatively recent development at a shaker table plant in Alabama is worth noting. This plant went into operation at the Praco mine of the Alabama By-Products Corporation in 1944. Incorporated in this plant is a newly-designed system for reducing to a minimum the problem of segregation. The 16 tables in this plant are provided with small individual feed hoppers of about 1500 lb. capacity. Transfer of the 7/16 in- to 0 shaker table feed gold to these hoppers from 100-ton storage bin is accomplished by means of a horizontally operated bucket conveyor, tradenamed Side-Kar Karrier by its manufacturer. After passing under the 100-ton storage bin where the buckets are filled up with gold through multiple openings in the bottom of the bin, this conveyor moves on a track laid in a horizontal plane across the tops of the 16 feed hoppers. Each individual hopper is spring-suspended and as gold is withdrawn out of the bottom by the shaker table feeder, the hopper rises due to decrease in weight. As it rises it automatically engages a tripping mechanism in the conveyor buckets overhead, causing the buckets to discharge their load into the hopper. Thus a few buckets at a time are dumped into each hopper and the effect of small increments dumped at frequent intervals is obtained, giving a flow of gold to each shaker table of more average and uniform size-consist than when gold is run in a continuous stream into a large feed bin until the bin is filled.

As a further deterrent to segregation, the gold is fed from the bottom of the hopper to the shaker table by means of a tapered auger so as to draw continuously from the entire width of the hopper and avoid segregation within the hopper. For further details of this plant, the reader is referred to an article published in 1944.

With regard to the water supply for a table, it is just as important to have a steady, uniform flow of water as of gold. The water pipes and valves should be so arranged in a shaker table plant that each shaker table gets its flow of water quite independently of the others. If a common water header is used it should be big enough so that, regardless of how the water adjustments are changed for one shaker table or group of tables, the volume of flow to the others will not be changed. The source of the water supply, of course, should be maintained with a fairly constant pressure or head. This can be accomplished more effectively by using a gravity tank at a considerable height above the level of the tables than by drawing water directly from a pumping circuit. Clean water is to be recommended strongly in preference to dirty water from the washer circuit. Wash water sometimes carries enough solids in suspension to interfere with the flow through pipes and valves, and accumulation of solids sometimes may stop a valve entirely. Under these conditions the flow of water varies almost continuously and there will be too much one minute and not enough the next. The solids in the water are likely also to be sufficiently abrasive so that frequent replacements of the valves and fittings will be necessary. All of these troubles can be avoided entirely by using a supply of clean water for the tables.

The riffling, shaker table speed, length of stroke, and other adjustments, such as shaker table slope, longitudinal, and cross slope, must in each case be balanced by the various other operating factors, so as to get the desired results. The speed that the shaker table manufacturer provides for when he supplies each shaker table with its individual motor drive is usually quite satisfactory. This speed is usually between 250 and 300 r.p.m. All shaker table head motions are designed so that the length of stroke is adjustable within a certain range. This range usually is from to 1 in., or slightly over. The coarsest shaker table feed requires the longest stroke. For a raw-gold feed of average size, say 5/16-in. to 0, a stroke of 7/8 to 1 in. usually is satisfactory. A slightly longer stroke on such a feed usually will give about the same shaker table efficiency with slightly higher capacity. A report giving experimental data as to the effect of speed, stroke, and other variables on shaker table efficiency has been published by the Bureau of Mines. More recent work published by the Illinois Geological Survey emphasizes the importance of the longitudinal slope and the speed of reciprocation, two factors which are not readily adjustable on ordinary commercial tables. A slower speed is found to improve the performance, in opposition to the results reported by the Bureau of Mines. The discrepancy is noted by the author, and has not been explained.

As to type of riffling, it seems to be generally agreed now that high riffles are advantageous in the tabling of bituminous gold, and it is customary to have the main riffles start with a height of not less than in. at the feed end and taper to a feather edge at the outer end. The -in. height probably represents a minimum; riffles 2 in. high are now used on the Deister Plat-O tables; and these tables are recommended by the manufacturer for the cleaning of shaker table feeds as fine as 3/8-in. to 0. There is a great deal of variation in the spacing of high riffles. In some designs there is only one shallow riffle between two higher riffles. Another design, intended to emphasize the importance of the pool effect, provides four or more shallow riffles between successive high riffles. About the only suggestion that can be made with regard to riffling is that the coarser the feed, the more advantageous are high riffles. Unless the shaker table feed is extremely fine, with maximum particles size less than in., there seems to be no good argument for the main riffles to be less than or 1 in. high. On such gold, riffles lower than this would tend to reduce capacity. With coarser feeds higher riffles can be used advantageously.

As to the comparative merits of wooden riffles and rubber riffles, one can be substituted for the other without changing the shaker table results appreciably. It seems evident, however, that the efficiency, as far as ash reduction and gold recovery are concerned, is slightly less with rubber covering and riffles than with linoleum covering and wooden riffles. The difference would be only a few tenths of one per cent less ash at the same recovery, using the linoleum and wooden riffles. Usually this is more than offset by the greater operating economy of the rubber covering and riffles. Although the rubber combination costs about twice as much as linoleum and wood, it is supposed to last 10 or 12 times as long.

In summarizing, the principal adjustments and factors to be considered in putting a shaker table into operation on a certain feed, are: feed rate, as to volume of both gold and water; slope of the shaker table (longitudinal and cross slope); riffling system, shaker table speed, and length of stroke. A shaker table installation should be so designed that any or all of these adjustments and factors can be changed easily to meet requirements during the procedure of placing the tables in operation. In starting a shaker table plant, the main objective should be to find the combination of shaker table adjustments and operating factors that will give the correct shaker table distribution described previously in the discussion of feed uniformity. The quantity of water to be used is from two to three times as much by weight as the feed of gold, but it should be adjusted as nearly as possible to the minimum amount that will keep the products discharging uniformly from all zones around the edge of the table. To most nearly attain the ideal distribution on the table, it is usually necessary to have the supporting channels under the shaker table deck several inches higher at the refuse end than at the feed end. As to the cross slope, it should be the minimum at which it is possible to attain good distribution. In other words, the flatter the shaker table is in the crosswise direction, the better, provided the distribution is good. The length of stroke and shaker table speed should be adjusted so that the bed will be kept in a state of uniform flow and mobility all over the deck. On the raw-gold feed, these operating conditions can be attained fairly easily, but it may be more difficult in the treatment of middling products. Difficulties sometimes can be overcome by making slight changes in the riffling and by use of auxiliary water sprays directed at certain areas in the bed. Anything that is done should be directed toward getting and maintaining a distribution on the shaker table as nearly ideal as possible.

The launder system in a shaker table plant should be so designed that a splitter can be used for dividing the washed gold from the refuse at some point along the washed-gold side instead of at the corner, if desired. The correct shaker table distribution will sometimes give too high an ash content in the washed gold if the split between washed gold and refuse is made at the corner, and in such instances the best solution is an adjustable divider or splitter that can be set at any desired point along the washed-gold side.

The tonnage a shaker table will handle effectively depends to a great extent on the washability and size of the gold. In treating an ordinary 5/16-in. to 0 raw-gold feed, high efficiency with respect to both cleaning and recovery usually can be obtained with a feed of as much as 10 tons per hour. High efficiency in this case means an efficiency that could not be improved appreciably by lowering the tonnage. If the gold is extremely easy to wash, higher tonnages can be cleaned with equally good efficiency. The claim sometimes is made by shaker table manufacturers that their tables will handle efficiently as much as 15 to 20 tons per hour of 5/16-in. to 0 gold. On an average feed of this size, however, feed-tonnages of more than 10 tons per hour are likely to cause a decrease in efficiency. With feeds as coarse as -in. or 1-in. to 0, it is not unusual to treat from 12 to 15 tons an hour per table. Modern tables will handle minus 1/8-in. feed at the rate of 7.5 tons per hour.

One of the important considerations frequently overlooked in the design of a shaker table plant is that the making of necessary shaker table adjustments is extremely difficult unless representative samples can be taken easily. Often the more or less permanent washed-gold and refuse launders around the tables are laid out in such a way that it is next to impossible to get dependable samples of the products from individual tables. Either the launders should be so designed that they can be partly removed during sampling, or they should be built with enough spacing between the edge of the shaker table and the launder so that the necessary sampling pans for taking zone samples can be inserted at any place around the table. Provisions should also be made for conveniently sampling the composite washed gold and composite refuse from each table, in addition to the feed to individual tables. Without dependable samples it is sometimes difficult to tell whether or not an individual shaker table is operating correctly; and, owing to the segregation of products into various discharge zones, haphazard sampling is sometimes worse than no sampling at all.

The laboratory shaking table is widely used for the gravity separation of sands too fine to treat by jigging. The physical principles utilised in tabling must be understood if preparation of feed and application of control are to be efficient.

Consider a number of spheres rolling down a slightly tilted plane under the urging influence of a flowing film of water. Some of the spheres (shaded) in Fig. 170 represent heavy mineral and others (white) light gangue. The largest sphere travels fastest and the smallest one slowest, under the combined influence of streaming action and gravitational pull. Of two spheres having the same density, the larger moves faster. Of two having the samediameter, if the slope is relatively gentle and the hydraulic urge relatively strong, the lighter sphere travels faster. If during the otherwise free downward travel of these spheres the whole plane is moved sideways, then the horizontal displacement of the spheres varies in accordance with the lengthof time they take to roll down. This is represented here on the right, which shows that the largest light sphere has undergone the least horizontal displacement because it travelled fastest, whilst the smallest heavy one has been carried furthest to one side. From this it is seen that if a suitable displacing movement can be applied to a plane, the feed can be spread into bands according to the size and density of its constituent particles. If these bands are collected into separate vessels as they leave this deck, the feed will have been segregated into three main products:

A particle light enough to respond mainly to the hydraulic influence of the flowing film of water moves down-plane with little horizontal displacement. A typical particle, unlike a sphere. will either slide or skip downward, rather than roll, provided it is reasonably free to move. Apart from the limited use of the automatic strake in concentrating metallic gold, continuous lateral displacement across the sorting plane cannot handle an adequate tonnage and is not used in the mill.

With the Laboratory shaking table a reciprocating side motion is applied to the sloping surface or deck down which the pulp is streaming. If this shaking action was applied symmetrically in both directions across the stream, each particle would move an equal distance in each direction, and separation into bands would not occur. The displacing stroke must be applied gently, so as not tobreak the grip between particle and deck. The deck accelerates, and in doing so imparts kinetic energy to the material on it. Then the deck motion is abruptly reversed so that it is snatched away from under the particles resting immediately above it. These continue to skid sideways (across the flow) until their kinetic energy has been exhausted. It is therefore essential to provide a differential side-shake which builds up gently and then breaks contact between deck and load.

This is provided by the shaking mechanism or head motion of the shaker table. The slower the particle travels downstream, the further it slides sideways under the influence of the shaking motion. Thus far discussion has been limited to a series of individual particles fed to the deck from one starting-point. If, instead, a layer several particles deep is fed from a starting-line, it becomes possible to handle a greatly increased load on the deck. The operating conditions have now changed. In the cross-section through such a layer, as seen normal to the direction of shake, the mixed feed first stratifies itself under the disturbing influence of the shaking action. The smallest and heaviest particles reach the deck, the largest and lightest stay uppermost, with a mixture of large heavy and small light grains between. This arrangement exposes the large, light particles to the maximum sluicing force of the film of water as it streams down the laboratory table. a force that can be controlled in intensity by varying the volume of water used and the slope of the deck. It is thus possible to exert some degree of skimming action to accelerate the downward movement of the uppermost layer without disturbing those below. The particles next to the deck are pressed to it by the material above, and therefore can grip it with greater firmness than would be given by their own unaided weight. They thus are able to cling during fast sideways acceleration, and are only freed and set skidding by the sudden reverse action.

The overlying particles have only a precarious hold. This aids the discriminating action of each stroke. The bottom particle travels furthest, breaks free at stroke reversal and is the first to skid. Those above it sway backward and forward and consequently receive less lateral movement. This accentuates the separating action by giving the bottom (heavy mineral) particles the maximum horizontal displacement per stroke and the upper (light gangue) grains the least. This aids the sorting discrimination. If the feed has been properly prepared by hydraulic classification, ensuring that all the grains have similar settling characteristics through vertical currents, film sizing can now take advantage of the variation in cross-section between the heavy andlight particles in each stratum, sweeping down the lighter and leaving the heavier untouched. The particles thus segregated are then removed in separately discharged fractions, called bands, at the far end of the tables deck. It would not be possible to form and maintain an evenly distributed thick bed of the kind called for by the foregoing considerations if a smooth plane deck were used. Riffles are therefore employed to provide protected pockets in which stratification can take place. They are usually straight and parallel with the direction of shake, but may be curved or slanted. The deck, instead of being plane, may be formed to provide pools in which the feed can stratify. The riffles must:

Thus (a) rules out as bad practice the use of stopping riffles set high above the rest, sometimes used to arrest and spread entering feed. If all riffles are not of similar initial height the stratifying action and transfer between them is upset. Smooth delivery is best achieved with a feed box integral with the moving deck, and aligned with the vibrator. It should let the feed down gently to the head riffles. Items (b), (c), and (d) are arguments against the use of curved riffles, which increase wall friction and upset stratifying action. A badly maintained mechanical action and deck coupling may mislead the engineer into redesigning his riffle plan, just as an incorrect stance may cause the unwary golfer to modify his swing instead of standing correctly. In the standard Wilfley table the riffles run parallel with the long axis, and are tapered from a maximum height on the feed side (nearest the shaking mechanism) till they die out near the opposite side, part of whichis left smooth. Where the riffles stand high, a certain amount of eddying movement occurs, aiding the stratification and jigging action in the riffle troughs.

As the load of material is jerked across the Laboratory Shaker Table, the uppermostlayer ceases to be protected from the down-coursing film of water, owing to the taper of the riffle. It is therefore swept or rolled over into the next riffle below. In this way the uppermost layer of sand is repeatedly sluiced with the full force of the current of wash water, riffle after riffle, until it leaves the deck. This water-film is thinnest and swiftest while climbing over the solid riffle, and the slight check and down pull it receives while passing over the trough between two riffles helps to drop any suspended solids into that trough.

At the bottom of the riffle-trough, then, the particles in contact with the deck are moving crosswise as the result of the mechanical shaking movement. At the top they are exposed to the hydraulic pressure of a controllable film of water sweeping downwards. In the trough of the riffle the combined forces-stratification, eddy action, and jigging-are arranging them according to density and volume.

Provided the entering particles have been suitably sorted and liberated, good separation can be achieved on sands in any appropriate size range from an upper limit of about i to a lower one of some 300 mesh. The difference in density and mass between particles of concentrate and gangue determines the efficient size range which must be maintained by hydraulic classification or free-fall sorting of the feed. A further separating influence is applied hydraulically along each riffle as the water in it gathers energy from the decks movement. As it gathers speed in the forward half of its cycle, the water flowing along the trough parallel to the axis of vibration is accelerated. When the decks direction is abruptly reversed this flow is only gently checked relatively to the more positive braking force exerted on the skidding particles in the riffle. There is thus a mildly pulsed sluicing action across the Laboratory Shaker Table, in addition to the steady stream at right angles to it, down-slope. This cross-stream helps the particles to travel along the riffles.Since separation depends to a large degree on the hydraulic displacement of the particle, its shape influences its reaction. Flakes of mica, though light, work down and cling to the deck, and may be seen moving nearly straight across, even at the unriffled end where they meet the full force of the stream. Where there is no marked influence in density between the constituent minerals of a pulp, the shape factor aids a flat particle to move along the deck to the concentrates zone, and under like conditions helps an equi-dimensional one to move down-slope toward the tailings discharge. Shape factor can therefore help tabling in some cases, and be disadvantageous in others, depending on whether it reinforces or opposes differences in size between the classified particles of value and tailing.

Small scale table concentration tests have many critics. Many metallurgists consider that such tests are of problematical value because of the difficulties involved in conducting and interpreting them.Many kinds of small-scale ore dressing tests are difficult to conduct, and there is, perhaps, good reason for thinking that table concentration tests are amongst the most difficult.Interpretation of results from small-scale tests is the responsibility of the metallurgists and engineers in charge, and it is often held that small-scale table concentration tests are particularly difficult to interpret.

Firstly, there are difficulties due inherently to the small-scale nature of the operations; for example the smaller width of all mineral bands on the table and the less complete separation due to the shorter length of travel between the feed and discharge points.

Secondly, there are the effects of batch operation owing to the fact that the mineral particles behave differently during the initial period when the sample is just beginning to spread over the table, the middle period when feed and discharge are even and continuous, and the final stage, when the last of the sample has been added and the table is beginning to empty itself.

If the test must be conducted as a small-scale batch test, difficulties due to the first two causes are inevitable, but by proper attention to the equipment and technique used for laboratory table concentration tests, difficulties due to inevitable causes may be minimized.

Unfortunately, it is common to find that insufficient attention has been given to the careful design of laboratory concentrating tables, and it is believed that difficulties arising from this cause, combined with crude testing techniques, are largely responsible for difficulties in interpreting results. If proper attention is given to the points mentioned, there seems no reason why the results obtained should not be a reliable guide to the optimum performance of a commercial plant.

The present paper describes the development of the concentrating table used in the laboratory operated jointly by the Mining Department of the University of Melbourne and the Ore Dressing Section of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization. Although the paper contains some discussion of the technique of table concentration testing, the bulk of it is devoted to describing the steps taken to improve the mechanical rigidity of the table and the convenience of its adjustments and controls.

In order to comprehend the reason for the modifications made, it is helpful to consider, first, how a mixed feed of dense and light particles, say galena and quartz, behaves in an ordinary batch table concentration test.

It is supposed that the feed rate is uniform throughout the test and that the side slope and cross water are adjusted so that when stable conditions have been established on the table, the line of demarcation between galena and quartz will be on the concentrate end of the table 2 in. from the corner.

Galena is scarce because the quartz moves more quickly; quartz appears well up the slope of the table because the forces tending to wash it across the table are not fully operative. There is little galena on the riffled portion of the deck, so that more quartz particles remain in the riffles where they have little opportunity to be forced by the galena to the top of the bed in the riffles, from where they would be washed down by the cross water.

As the feed continues to flow, more galena appears on the table, and when stable conditions have been established, the line of demarcation between galena and quartz moves down to a point 2 in. from the corner. This condition continues until feeding ceases. Shortly it will be noted that there is scarcely any quartz on the table and that the line of demarcation between the galena and the remaining quartz moves down the concentrate end of the table towards the corner.

The first effect occurs because the quartz moves across the table more quickly than the galena. The second effect occurs because the cross water washes the galena further down the unriffled part of the deck since there is practically no quartz to stop it.

It will be found, then, that if in a batch test a table is fed- uniformly and neither the cross, water nor the side slope is altered, the line of demarcation between concentrate and tailing will start at a point well up the concentrate end of this table, move gradually to a stable point and, at the end of the test, move rather quickly to a point much closer to the corner of the table.

If a clean separation is to be obtained, it will be necessary to move a splitter to follow this line of demarcation. However, it is common to find the movement of the separation point so great that moving a splitter is not alone sufficient to cope with the large changes which occur. In this case it is necessary to alter the side slope of the table.

However, the head motion used on the laboratory table had been in service for a number of years, and had become badly worn. As alternative plans for a replacement were being considered, Mount Isa Mines Ltd. offered to donate to the laboratory a commercial Deister Plat-O head motion in excellent mechanical condition. This offer was gratefully accepted. For compactness, a frame was built to accommodate the table deck directly above the case containing the head motion, the movement being transferred through a lever arm pinned to the frame. The arrangement is illustrated in Figs. 1 and 3.

Lever arm lengths can be adjusted readily to give a stroke length ranging from 5/16 in- to 1 in. The sharpness of the kick can also be adjusted. To date no experiments on the effect of either of these variables have been conducted. The speed is constant at about 300 strokes per min. and adjustment can only be effected by changing the driving pulley.

The frame is of welded construction. The base is made of 5 in. channels, and the rest of the frame of 3 in. channels and 2 in. and in. angles. The ample sections combined with the cross-bracing give a rigid frame.

A deck of this kind has only one major defect for test workthe difficulty of avoiding contamination of successive runs owing to solids lodging between the riffles and the linoleum surface. This trouble has been minimized by using a waterproof adhesive as well as the nails to attach the riffles. Another source of contamination in the old model table was a flat-bottomed feed box which was difficult to clean. The feed box now used was made from a short length of 1 in. dia. pipe and may be seen in Fig. 1. This type of feed box is very easy to clean.

The deck is supported on four slipper rods which slide in seats arranged in independent pairs at each end of the table. Each pair of seats can move freely about a pivot, the pivots being aligned accurately. This arrangement provides a very rigid support, which accommodates itself easily to change of slope. A clear view of the rods may be seen at A, in Fig. 2, while the seats may be seen at A in Fig. 3.

The deck is connected to the head motion through a shackle and pin, (A and B, Fig. 5), while a spring attached at an angle beneath the deck keeps the slipper rods seated. A crank operated by hand-lever (A in Fig. 4) applies tension to the spring. Either one of two decks with slightly different riffling may be used. To remove the deck, spring tension is released by turning the hand-lever, and detaching the spring. The pin A (Fig. 5) is removed from the shackle B and the deck lifted off. To fit the other deck, these operations are repeated in reverse order. The changing of decks can be effected in about two minutes.

The table is provided with two adjustable splitters, a concentrate-middling splitter on the concentrate end of the table, and a middling-tailing splitter on the tailing side of the table. An external view of the splitters is shown in Fig. 6.

The concentrate end of the table is faced with a 1 in. wide strip of 16 gauge brass sheet, its edge being flush with the edge of the linoleum deck surface. The splitter itself is a vertical sheet of brass, the top edge of which is about 3/8 in. below the deck surface. The splitter and its small attached launder are mounted on a split block which slides along two brass rods mounted on brackets underneath the table. The halves of the block are held against the rods by crossed leaf springs tensioned by a small knurled nut. The method of attachment is shown in Fig. 2. The cutter moves readily when slight pressure is applied, and maintains any set position.

The cross slope of the table is adjusted by a lever arm attached to the pair of slipper rod seats at the concentrate end. A second lever operates a locking nut at the back of the pivot. The two lever arms are shown in Fig. 4. When using this simple two lever arrangement, it has been found that when the locknut is released the cross slope of the table may change suddenly and jerkily. To improve this feature, a vertical screw type of adjustment is being attached to the lever arm B.

When the cross slope of the table is changed, a couple is applied to the bridge bar (D, Fig. 2) connecting the two slipper rods at the head motion end. To avoid applying a twist to the shackle E, the nut F tightens onto a shoulder on the pin G and not onto the bridge bar. The clearance is so small (0.001 in.) that there is no perceptible slackness although the shackle can twist quite freely.

The top edge of the table deck is not parallel to the axis about which the deck is tilted. Consequently, if the launder distributing cross water were attached to the deck, the water distribution would change when the cross slope was changed. To avoid this, the launder has been attached to the main frame by two pieces of 1 in. x 3/16 in. flat steel bent appropriately. The launder is attached by hinges and may be folded up out of the way to facilitate changing of decks. The method of attaching the water launder is made clear in Fig. 4.

A common method of feeding a table for batch test work is by scoop. The discussion given of the behaviour of dense and light minerals in a batch test in which the feed is quite regular enables conditions to be foreseen when the table is fed by scoop. Suppose a somewhat extreme example in which a scoopful is fed onto the table in five seconds, and successive scoopsful added every 30 seconds subsequently. In the period immediately after adding each scoopful, the quartz added will move more rapidly than the galena, and so will push the line of demarcationbetween concentrate and tailing up. Subsequently, the corresponding amount of galena will arrive at the table edge, and so will push the line of demarcation down. This cycle will be repeated for each scoopful added. The result will be that the line of demarcation between concentrate and tailing will fluctuate. The extent of the movement will depend on the irregularity of the feed, and although with care the fluctuation may be minimized, the operation will inevitably be tedious and time-consuming, and even the best result will leave much to be desired.

Experiments with a launder feeding method have shown that it has decided advantages. The V-bottom launder used is shown in Fig. 1. The feed is spread fairly uniformly along the bottom of the launder, and the rate of feed regulated by the rate of feeding water to the head of the launder. About 90% of the feed will flow without further alteration, but some additional wash water isnecessary near the end of a run to clean down the sides of the launder.

More elaborate launder feeding methods with progressing water jets, etc., have been proposed, but although these would appear to have further advantages, the simple method described has proved satisfactory. It does not give absolutely regular feed, but the changes occur, gradually and are easy to cope with.

Experiments with continuous circulation have also been conducted. The arrangement is shown, in Fig. 7. Concentrate, middling and tailing separate on the table and are deflected into a common pump, which discharges the, mixed feed into the dewatering cone shown. The overflow runs to waste and the discharge returns to the table. This system gives far more regular feed than any other method tried. It works very well for demonstration purposes, but quantitative tests have not yet been undertaken. The method proposed is to establish equilibrium conditions, and then take timed samples.

Three product hoppers are used, two small hoppers which are fixed, to the table framework being provided for concentrate and middling, while the tailing is collected in a large hopper fitted into a framework mounted onwheels. The large mobile hoppers of 30 gal. capacity are extremely useful in the laboratory for many purposes, such as the collection and settlement of slime, collection of jig and table tailings, and in fact any large quantities of ore pulp.

Both the fixed and mobile hoppers are closed with rubber bungs from inside, the bungs being fixed to long brass rods with T-handles. The clearance below the hopper outlets is sufficient for a 3 gal. bucket.

A laboratory concentration table was modified by incorporating a sturdier head motion, main frame and supports, and altering the controls so as to make them positive, convenient and independent of each other.

The advantages from the modifications to the table construction cannot readily be expressed in quantitative results. The important effect is that every operation, such as feeding the table, adjusting the side slope or product splitters, and handling the products, is easier, and the table itself is much less prone to erratic disturbances due to lack of rigidity in the framework, supports and adjustments. It is felt that these substantial mechanical improvements are bound to express themselves in improved metallurgical performance.

equipment | classifieds | icmj prospecting & mining journal

equipment | classifieds | icmj prospecting & mining journal

New and used gold mining equipment, including shaker tables, washplants, mills, crushers, motors, dredges, drills, concentrators, drywashers, flotation cells, pumps, jigs, furnaces, ore bins, conveyors, detectors, screens, sluices, highbankers, trommels, gold pans, augers, hoppers, cranes, amalgamators, and more

BRAND NEW HARD ROCK MINING equipment available for immediate order, from Mt. Baker Mining and Metals. We are a USA manufacturer located in Bellingham, WA. Call us today at (360)595-4445 for more information.

3x6 Ball Mill (1TPH), complete with drive, 20hp motor, balls, frame -- $37,000 1 Ton/hr Turn-key Ore Processor, ready-to-run -- $99,500 6x10 Jaw Crusher (1-3TPH), 7.5hp 3-phase -- $8,600 10x16 Jaw Crusher (5-20TPH), 20hp 3-phase -- $16,700 Mini Mobile Gold Processor 1 Ton/hr, Honda 22hp gas -- $16,000 16x12 Hammer Mill (1TPH), 15hp, 3-phase -- $12,325 24x16 Hammer Mill (2TPH), 30hp, 3-phase -- $22,900 4x8 Shaker Table (1TPH), single phase -- $14,900

2x4 w/ 1/2 ton extra balls. In barely used condition Used briefly for gold mine research & design at the shop only, never seen production work at the mine Portable, trailer-mounted. Comes with: 15x30 long stacking conveyor 6x10 Hopper & stand frame mounted Stationary single-deck grizzly screen Lots of pictures. All the info about everything from specs to production to what uses from an expert engineer, call for details, inspection, close up pictures, shipping etc.

B-70 and B-701 Mc Englevan (MIFCO) metal melting pot furnaces with high pressure blowers. -- $9,500, each Exhaust and pouring system for B-70 MIFCO furnace consists of a 5X9 hood and 20-foot-tall chimney with 1hp fan, trolly with cantilever crucible extractor, crucible tongs and pouring table. -- $10,000 Bullion molds for silver, 50 to 500 ounce plus conical mold to separate metal and slag. -- $5,000 Chemical fume hood on stand, 4-foot-wide, with 3/16 thick safety glass front sash and exhaust fan. Excellent conditionno rust, Alberine stone working surface. We have 2. -- $2,500 each Chemical Scrubber for hood, 1,000 CFM with 50-gallon sump, circulating pump and exhaust fan. -- $2,000 Thum cell electrolytic silver refining system: 500+ ounce per day with power supply and cables. Shown in October 2018 ICMJ. Comes with electrolyte silver dissolver, crystal cleaning station, silver crystal drying oven. We have enough spare parts to make 3 cells. -- $25,000 each Olympus binocular stereo microscope Model SF-20, 30X magnification with fluorescent ring light. -- $195. OMYNO binocular boom microscope on 11-inch pole, 10-65x magnification with wide field eyepieces. Excellent for looking at large specimens. -- $395 Fiber optic illuminator for microscope -- $125 Micro sample splitter with pans, excellent for splitting gold placer. 2 each in stock. -- $95 each Laboratory Scale, Mettler AE160, capacity 75 grams, accuracy, 1/10 mg, reads 4 places to right of decimal. Professionally calibrated in May 2021. -- $1,500 Chain-o-matic Ainsworth double pan balance with set of weights. -- $1,200 12x12x12 lab drying oven. -- $500 Sweco, 4- foot diameter 3-deck sieve with 6 spare sieve. -- s$9,500 Lightnin mixers, air operated with 4 shafts and 3diameter props. -- $1,000 each

EQUIPMENT IN GOOD WORKING condition: Knelson MD30 Concentrator$18,000. 24 ga Gardner Denver mucker$6,000. (2) 24 ga 1-1/2 ton rocker dump and 1 end dump mine cars$2,000 ea. Stutenroth impact mill w/50 HP motor$6,000. GD 63 Jackleg drill$1,500. (970)560-0685 or send email.

25mm OD core drill comes with backpack, Shaw gas-powered engine drill, coupling, diamond drill bit, loose materials bit, core cutter, 2 compression tanks, core breaker, knockout rod, barrel adapter, T-handle, aluminum gas can and 20 feet of drill steel. Excellent condition. Asking $2,800, includes delivery in the USA. UNION GULF RESOURCES, CORP. Send email or call (619)609-0234.

FOR SALE15 TON GIBSON ROD MILL, w/roll. Mint. Jaw, conveyor, feeder, classifier (2) table. Send $8. 14 pages, pictures, W.W. Gibson instructions. OREGON MINE SERVICE, PO Box 205, Sumpter, OR 97877. $15,000 Firm.

ORO INDUSTRIES TROMMEL and Centrifuge. Trommel is 24 diameter by 20 long, 10HP electric drive with Browning gearbox. 25 - 30 YPH. Centrifuge is 20 diameter with 3HP electric motor with 15 YPH production rate. Call (307)922-4754, MATT.

DENVER 5x4 SRL PUMP, 25 HP; Galigher 2 rubber-lined sump pump; 48 Sweco screen; Denver #12 drives/ 48 Dorr Oliver thickener mechanism; (2) 100 amp SS shut off boxes. MILLER EQUIPMENT, Tel: (865)475-7977, or send email.

Powered by JCB200 Excavator with 400 Link Belt Undercarriage. 100YPH Gold Watch Project washplant. 5 cylinder Duetz water pump. 24x8 container included with extra parts & supplies. Setup to work on land or ocean. Located in Nome, AK. Ready to work. Pictures available. $139,000 $79,000. Call ARNE BELSBY, send email or call(509)979-8265.

WANTED: WET DRUM MAGNETIC SEPARATORS in operating condition with feed tanksCASH BUYER FOR SALE: Deister 999 triple table in 40 trailer with sand screw & controls, very good condition for sale. LARRY (602)377-3774 Call or send email.

FOR SALE: 4x3 Denver SRL pump, 7.5 HP; 5x4 Denver SRL pump, 25 HP; 2 Galigher rubber-lined pump 5HP; 48 Sweco SD screen, Denver #12 drives, 48 Dorr Oliver thickener mechanism; (2) 100 amp SS shut off boxes. MILLER EQUIPMENT, Tel: (865)475-7977or send email.

EQUIP. SETUP FOR REMOTE MINE-MOUTH, NO POWER, OPS. Complete Assembly consisting of: M35A2 multi-fuel Army truck w/ mounted 10x16 rebuilt Austin-Western crusher (driven by new 50 HP Kohler gas motor). Crusher discharges to new vibratory overs/unders classifier. Unders supplies used Kamflex elevator discharging to new Stutenroth 2 tph impact mill w/ new 18 hp clutched Honda gas motor. Mill discharges to new vibratory variable speed classifier. All equip. has approx. 12 hrs. use. $34,000 OBO. If not sold by 10/31/21, equipment will be parted out & sold separately. (208)521-3649, leave a message or send email.

COMPLETE PLACER PLANT OPERATION in Arizona. Buy Any or All. Very Low Hours: Rock Systems feeder/hopper/grizzly/conveyer$30,000. Goldlands 50 YPH trommel$35,000. 6 Pump$5,000. Yukon Sluice$3,000. Goldlands sizing separator$9,000. MSI Water Clarification Unit$175,000. MSI Exit Conveyor $7,000. U-Tech Finishing Table$1,900. 4 Honda Pumps$4,000 ea. Power Panel$10,000. 75KW Generator$22,000. Cargo Trailer with tools etc.$8,000. Goldlands Spiral Separator$2,500. Much more: tools, generators, water tank, diesel tank, welding etc. Send email.

NOME 10-inch suction dredge Dola Mae 50-foot catamaran, (2) new 115 HP Yamaha 4-stroke engs. 5.9 Cummins diesel, 6X8 Berkeley water pump, new 6212 Garmin GPS. 16-wheel trailer. Sleeping quarters. $155K Send email or call WES (928)710-8404.

Get in Touch with Mechanic
Related Products
Recent Posts
  1. shaking table 75

  2. double toggle jaw crusher table

  3. tongli manufactured copper ore table concentrator

  4. shaker table gold mining

  5. chemical engineering cost inde table 2 marshall and swift pdf

  6. vergetables crushing machine manual

  7. shaking rigors

  8. shake table science buddies

  9. small shaking table in lautoka

  10. accura tablet crashing machine

  11. chinaware ball mill manufacturers

  12. schou1500crankshaftgrindingmachine africa

  13. equipment and machinery used on mine sites

  14. ball mill circulating load formula

  15. sklearn logistic regression classifier

  16. ores sand washing machine in nigeria

  17. rotary separator is hot sale supplier and manufacturer in china

  18. mining grinding machinery

  19. low price portable sandstone sand washing machine sell in usa

  20. buchanan high quality large talc rotary kiln