laboratory shaking table | laboratory jerking table | small shaking table | shaking table for laboratory | jerking table for laboratory - gtek laboratory

laboratory shaking table | laboratory jerking table | small shaking table | shaking table for laboratory | jerking table for laboratory - gtek laboratory

LY shaking table is suitable for technical research and development of laboratories in schools, colleagues and universities. It can also be used as a gravity equipment in pilot plant or small scale mineral processing plant. The effect of LY shaking table is almost same as that of big size shaking table. LY shaking table features high enrichment ratio, compact structure and reliable operation.

rp-4 gold shaker table sale

rp-4 gold shaker table sale

The RP-4 shaker table is the most widely used and most successful gold gravity shaking concentrating table worldwide, used by small and large mining operations and the hobbyist. The patented RP-4 is designed for separation of heavy mineral and gemstone concentrate. The RP-4 table can process up to 600 (typically 400) lbs. per hour of black sand magnetite or pulverised rock with little to no losses. The RP-4 uses a unique reverse polarity of rare earth magnets, which will cause the magnetite to rise and be washed off into the tails. This allows the micron gold to be released from the magnetite, letting the gold travelling to the catch. The RP-4 is compact and weighs 60 lbs. With a small generator and water tank, no location is too remote for its use. The RP-4 is a complete, ready to go gold recovery machine. THERE ARE NO SCREEN INCLUDED with the small shaking table. Use was reservoirsgreater than 250 gallon and recycle all your water. Only 400 Watt of power drawn by typical pump. The small RP4 gold shaking has a mini deck of 13wide x 36 long = 3.25 square feet of tabling area. The RP-4 is the best and longest selling small miner shaker table still on the market today. With many 1000s of units sold during the last 10 years! Review the RP-4 Operating Manual and Installation Guide lower on this page.

The RP-4 uses a unique reverse polarity of rare earth magnets which will cause the magnetite to rise and be washed off into the tails and allowing the micron gold to be released from the magnetite leaving the gold travelling to the catch.

When assembling the RP-4, it is very important to set it up correctly to get the best recovery. The unit needs to be bolted preferably to a concrete pad or bedrock when in the field. It can be weighted down with seven or eight large sandbags. Wooden stands will set up harmonics and vibrations in the unit. Vibrations will create a negative effect on the concentrating action of the deck and create a scattering effect on the gold. We would strongly advise getting the optional stand to mount it. See a detailed RP4 Shaker Table review.

Once you have the RP-4 mounted or weighted down, you will want to level it, place a level under the machine on the bar running attached to the two mounting legs. Use washers to get a precise level adjustment. Once mounted and leveled, use the adjustment screw to adjust the horizontal slope of the deck. It took me about 10 minutes of playing with the adjustment till you are satisfied the slope angle was where it needed to be. A general rule for good recovery is less grade for the table deck and as much water as possible without scouring off the fine gold particles.

When the table is set, wet down your black sand concentrates with water and a couple drops of Jet-Dry to help keep any fine gold from floating off the table. You are now ready to start feeding the RP-4.

DO NOT dump material into the feed tray. You want a nice steady feed without overloading the table. Use a scoop and feed it steadily. Watch the back where the small gold should concentrate. If you see fine gold towards the middle, adjust your table angle just a bit at a time till it is where it needs to be.

Run a few buckets of black sand tailings that already panned out just in case there might have been some gold left behind. Its a good thing, too, because I pulled almost three pennyweights of gold out of my waste materials. Thats a pennyweight per bucket!

You could run all of you concentrates over this awesome little RP-4 Gravity Shaker Table. Some ran bottles No. 1 and No. 2 over the table a second time and cleaned it up some more, getting out almost all of the sand in No. 1 and removing more than half the sand from No. 2. It was amazing to see a nice line of fine gold just dancin down the table into the bottle. And, to think you were was about to throw away all of that black sand that still had color in it! This machine is small enough for the prospector and small-scale miner who, like me, wants all of the gold for his or her hard work. The 911MPE-RP-4 Gravity Shaker Table is also big enough to clean up bucket after bucket of concentrates from a big operation! The RP4 people came up with the solution for getting all of the gold!

All RP4 shaker tables operate best when firmly secured to a dense solid mounting base. Wooden stands will set up harmonics and vibrations. Dense concrete or solid bedrock is preferred or a heavy braced steel table sitting on concrete. Mount shaker table to solid bed rock if possible when operating in the field. When that is not an option, six or seven sand bags may also be used if concrete or bedrock is not available for mounting.

Place a level on top of the steel bar that extends between the two bolts down mounting feet.Use flat washers installed under either end of the mounting feet for precise level adjustment in the long axis.

At no time should sand or slime be re-circulated back with mill water. Large, calm, surface areas are required to settle slimes. Buckets, barrels or any deep containers with turbulent water will not allow slimes to settle. Tailings should discharge into a tails pond or into a primary holding vessel before entering slime settling ponds. Surface area is more important than depth. A small 10 x 20 ft. settling pond can be installed in about 30 minutes. Shovel a 6 high retainer wall of earth and remove all gravel. Lay a soft bed of sand in the bottom. A small raised wall area (with the top approximately 2 blow water level) should be placed around the pump area. Roll out plastic liner and fill with water. Desert areas require a plastic cover to retard evaporation. Use a 24 wood across pond and lay plastic.

As with ponds, at no time should sand or slime be re-circulated back with mill water. A calm surface is needed in the final two barrels to settle slimes. (In lieu of the last two barrels, the discharge from barrel two may be directed to a settling pond as outlined above.)Turbulent water will not allow slimes to settle. Tailings are discharged into the first container.

A small compact tailings thickener introduces tailings feed at a controlled velocity in a horizontal feed design that eliminates the conventional free settling zone. The feed particles quickly contact previously formed agglomerates. This action promotes further agglomeration and compacting of the solids. Slowly rotating rakes aid in compacting the solids and moving them along to the discharge pipe, these solids are eventually discharged at the bottom of the unit. Under flow from the thickener 60-65% solids are processed through a vacuum filter and a90-95% solids is sent to the tailings area. Tailings thickeners are compact and will replace ponds. A 23 ft. diameter will process flow rates at 800 gpm or 50 tph.

Pine oils and vegetation oils regularly coat the surface of placer gold. Sometimes up to 50% of the smaller gold will float to the surface and into the tails. The pine oil flotation method for floating gold is still in use today. A good wetting agent will aid in the settling and recovery of oil coated gold.

Separation of concentrate from tails Minerals or substances that differ in specific gravity of2.5 or to an appreciable extent, can be separated on shaker tables with substantially complete recovery. A difference in the shape of particles will aid concentration in some instances and losses in others. Generally speaking, flat particles rise to the surface of the feed material while in the presence of rounded particles of the same specific gravity. Particles of the same specific gravity but varying in particle size, can be separated to a certain extent, varying in particle size, can be separated to a certain extent, removing the larger from the smaller, such as washing slime from granular products.

Mill practice has found it advantageous in having the concentrate particles smaller than the tailing product. Small heavy magnetite particles will crowd out larger particles of flat gold making a good concentrate almost impossible with standard gravity concentrating devices. The RP-4 table, using rare earth reverse polarity magnets, overcame this problem by lifting the magnetite out and above the concentrate material thus allowing the magnetite to be washed into the tails. This leaves the non-magnetics in place to separate normally.

No established mathematical relationship exists for the determination of the smallest size of concentrate particle and the largest size of tailing particle that can be treated together. Other factors, such as character of feed material, shape of particles, difference in specific gravity, slope or grade of table dock and volume of cross flow wash water will alter the final concentrate.

Size of feed material will determine the table settings. Pulverized rod mill pulps for gravity recovery tables should not exceed 65-minus to 100-minus 95% except where specific gravity, size, and shape will allow good recovery. Recovery of precious metals can be made when processing slime size particles down to 500-minus, if the accompanying gangue is not so coarse as to require excessive wash water or excessive grade to remove the gangue, (pronounced gang), to the tails. Wetting agents must be used for settling small micron sized gold particles. Once settled, 400-minus to 500 minus gold particles are readily moved and saved by the RP-4shaker table head motion. Oversized feed material will require excess grade to remove the large sized gangue,thus forcing large pieces of gold further down slope and into the middling. Too much grade and the fine gold will lift off the deck and wash into the tailings. Close screening of the concentrate into several sizes requires less grade to remove the gangue and will produce a cleaner product. A more economical method is to screen the head ore to window screen size (16-minus) or smaller and re-run the middling and cons to recover the larger gold. This concept can be used on the RP-4 shaker tables and will recover all the gold with no extra screens. A general rule for good recovery is less grade for the table deck and as much was water as possible without scouring off the fine gold. Re-processing on two tables will yield a clean concentrate without excess screening. Oversized gold that will not pass through window screen size mounted on RP-4 shaker tables, will be saved in the nugget trap. Bending a small 1/4 screen lip at the discharge end of the screen will trap and save the large gold on the screen for hand removal.

On the first run, at least one inch or more of the black concentrate line should be split out and saved into the #2 concentrate bin. This concentrate will be re-run and the clean gold saved into the #1 concentrate pocket. Argentite silver will be gray to dull black in color and many times this product would be lost in the middling if too close of a split is made.

The riffled portion of the RP-4 shaker table separates coarse non-sized feed material better than the un-riffled cleaning portion. Upon entering the non-riffled cleaning plane, small gangue material will crowd out and force the larger pieces of gold further down slope into the middling. Screen or to classify.

The largest feed particles should not exceed 1/16 in size. It is recommended that a 16-minus or smaller screen be used before concentrating on the RP-4 shaker table, eliminating the need for separate screening devices. Perfect screen sizing of feed material is un-economical, almost impossible, and is not recommended below 65-minus.

A classified feed is recommended for maximum recovery, (dredge concentrates, jig concentrates, etc.) The weight of mill opinion is overwhelmingly in favor of classified feed material for close work. Dredge concentrates are rough classified and limiting the upper size of table feed by means of a submerged deck screen or amechanical classifier is all that is necessary. A separate screen for the sand underflow is used for improved recovery when using tables.

Head feed capacity on the RP-4 tables will differ depending on the feed size, pulp mixture and other conditions. Generally speaking, more head feed material may be processed when feeding unclassified, larger screened sized material and correspondingly, less material may be processed when feeding smaller sized classified rod or ball mill pulps. Smaller classified feed material will yield a cleaner concentrate. Ultimately, the shape of the feed material particles and a quick trial test will determine the maximum upper size.

The width between the riffles of the RP-4 table is small and any particle over 1/8 may cause clogging of the bedding material. A few placer operators will pass 1/8 or larger feed material across the RP-4 table, without a screen, with the intent of making a rough concentrate for final clean up at a later date. This method will work, but excess horizontal slope/grade of the table deck must not be used as some losses of the precious metals will occur. Magnetite black sands feed material, passing a 16-minus screen (window screen size if 16-minus + or -) will separate without losses and make a good concentrate at approximately 500 to 600lbs feed per hour for the RP-4. Head feed material must flow onto the RP-4 screen, at a constant even feed rate. An excess of head feed material placed onthe table and screen at a given time will cause some gold to discharge into the tailings nugget trap. Head feed material should be fed at the end of the water bar into the pre-treatment feed sluice. Do not allow dry head feed material to form thick solids. The wash water will not wash and dilate the head feed material properly, thus allowing fine gold to wash into the tails.

Feed material should disperse quickly and wash down slope at a steady rate, covering all the riffles at the head end,washing and spilling over into the tails trough. A mechanical or wet slurry pump feeder (75% water slurry) is recommended for providing a good steady flow of feed material. This will relieve the mill operator of a tedious chore of a constantly changing concentrate line when hand feeding.

Eight gallons of water per minute is considered minimum for black sands separation/concentration on the RP-4 shaker table. 15 gallons of water per minute is consideredoptimum and will change according to feed material size, feed volume and table grade. A 1 inch hose will pass up to 15 gpm, for good recovery, wash water must completely cover the feed material 1/4 or more on the screen.

The PVC water distribution bar is pre-drilled with individual water volume outlets, supplying a precision water flow. Water volume adjustment can be accomplished by installing a 1 mechanical PVC ball valve for restricting the flow of water to the water distributing holes. Said valve may be attached between the garden hose attachment and water distributing bar.

More water at the head end and less water at the concentrate end is the general rule for precise water flow. More feed material will occupy the head end of the RP-4 shaker table deck in deep troughs and less material will occupy the concentrate end on the cleaning plane. A normal water flow will completely cover the feed material over the entire table and flow with no water turbulence.

A rubber wave cloth is installed to create a water interface and to smooth out all water turbulence. This cloth is installed with holes. Holes allow water to run underneath and over the top of the cloth and upon exiting will create a water interface smoothing out all the water turbulence. Bottom of water cloth must contact the deck.

Avoid excessive slope and shallow turbulent water.For new installations, all horizontal grade/slope adjustments should be calculated measuring from the concentrate end of the steel frame to the mounting base. For fine gold, the deck should be adjusted almost flat.

All head feed must be fed as a 75% water pulp. Clean classified sand size magnetite will feed without too much problem when fed dry. Ground rod or ball mill feed material 65-minus or smaller must be fed wet, (75% water slurry by weight or more) and evenly at a constant rate, spilling over into the tails drain troughat the head end of the table. Feed material without sufficient water will not dilute quickly andwill carry concentrate too far down slope or into the tails. A good wet pulp with a deflocculant and a wetting agent will aid the precious metals to sink and trap within the first riffles, thus moving onto the cleaning plane for film sizing. Round particles of gold will sink instantly and trap within the first riffles. The smaller flat gold particles will be carried further down slope to be trapped in the mid riffles. Potential losses of gold can occur if the table deck is overloaded by force feeding at a faster rate than the smaller flat gold can settle out. Under-feeding will result in the magnetites inability to wash out of the riffles, thus leaving a small amount of magnetiteconcentrated with the gold. A small addition of clean quartz sand added to a black sand concentrate will force the magnetite to the surface and will aid in its removal. Slimes require a separate table operation.

In flotation, surface active substances which have the active constituent in the positive ion. Used to flocculate and to collect minerals that are not flocculated by the reagents, such as oleic acid or soaps, in which the surface active ingredient is the negative ion. Reagents used are chiefly the quaternary ammonium compounds, for example, cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide.

A substance composed of extremely small particles, ranging from 0.2 micron to 0.005 micron, which when mixed with a liquid will not gravity separate or settle, but remain permanently suspended in solution.

A crusher is a machine designed to reduce large rocks into smaller rocks, gravel, or rock dust. Crushers may be used to reduce the size, or change the form, of waste materials so they can be more easily disposed of or recycled, or to reduce the size of a solid mix of raw materials (as in rock ore), so that pieces of different composition can be differentiated. Crushing is the process of transferring a force amplified by mechanical advantage through a material made of molecules that bond together more strongly, and resist deformation more, than those in the material being crushed do. Crushing devices hold material between two parallel ortangent solid surfaces, and apply sufficient force to bring the surfaces together togenerate enough energy within the material being crushed so that its molecules separate from (fracturing), or change alignment in relation to (deformation), each other. The earliest crushers were hand-held stones, where the weight of the stone provided a boost to muscle power, used against a stone anvil. Querns and mortars are types of these crushing devices.

A basic alkali material, such as sodium carbonate or sodium silicate, used as an electrolyte to disperse and separate non-metallic or metallic particles. Added to Slip to increase fluidity. Used to aid in the beneficiation of ores, to convert into individual very fine particles, creating a state of colloidal suspension in which the individual particles of gold will separate from clay or other particles. This condition being maintained by the attraction of the particles for the dispersing medium, water, purchase at any chemical house.

Manner in which the intensity and direction of an electrical or magnetic field change as a function of time that results from the superposition of two alternating fields, (+/-) that differ in direction and in phase.

The smelting of metallic ores for the recovery of precious metals, requiring a furnace heat. Each milligram of recovered precious metal is gravimetric weighed and reported as one ounce pershort ton. Atomic Absorption (AA finish) is the preferred method for replacing the gravimetric weighing system.

A reagent added to a dispersion of solids in a liquid to bring together the fine particles to form flocs and which thereby promotes settling, especially in clays and soils. For example, lime alters the soil pH and acts as a flocculent in clay soils. Acid reagents and brine are also used as a flocculent.

The method of mineral separation in which a froth created in water with air and by a variety of reagents floats some finely crushed minerals, whereas other minerals sink. Separate concentrates are made possible by the use of suitable depressors and activators.

An igneous oxide of iron, with a specific gravity of 5.2 and having an iron content of 65-70% or more. Limonite crystals, sometimes mistaken for magnetite, occurs with the magnetite and sometimes may contain gold. Vinegar will remove gold locked in limonite coated magnetite.

In materials processing a grinder is a machine for producing fine particle size reduction through attrition and compressive forces at the grain size level. See also CRUSHER for mechanisms producing larger particles. Since the grinding process needs generally a lot of energy, an original experimental way to measure the energy used locally during milling with different machines was proposed recently.

A typical type of fine grinder is the ball mill. A slightly inclined or horizontal rotating cylinder is partially filled with balls, usually stone or metal, which grinds material to the necessary fineness by friction and impact with the tumbling balls. Ball mills normally operate with an approximate ball charge of 30%. Ball mills are characterized by their smaller (comparatively) diameter and longer length, and often have a length 1.5 to 2.5 times the diameter. The feed is at one end of the cylinder and the discharge is at the other. Ball mills are commonly used in the manufacture of Portland cement and finer grinding stages of mineral processing. Industrial ball mills can be as large as 8.5 m (28 ft) in diameter with a 22 MW motor, drawing approximately 0.0011% of the total worlds power. However, small versions of ball mills can be found in laboratories where they are used for grinding sample material for quality assurance.

A rotating drum causes friction and attrition between steel rods and ore particles. But note that the term rod mill is also used as a synonym for a slitting mill, which makes rods of iron or other metal. Rod mills are less common than ball mills for grinding minerals.

Screening is the separation of solid materials of different sizes by causing one component to remain on a surface provided with apertures through which the other component passes. Screen size is determined by the number of openings per running inch. Wire size will affect size of openings. -500=500 openings per inch is maximum for gravity operations due to having a solid disperse phase.

Long established in concentration of sands or finely crushed ores by gravity. Plane, rhombohedra deck is mounted horizontally and can be sloped about its axis by a tilting screw. Deck is molded of ABS plastic, and has longitudinal riffles dying a discharge end to a smooth cleaning area. An eccentric is used to create a gentle forward motion, compounded to full speed and a rapid return motion of table longitudinally. This instant reverse motion moves the sands along, while they are exposed to the sweeping and scouring action of a film of water flowingdown slope into a launder trough and concentrates are moved along to be discharged at the opposite end of the deck.

A material of extremely fine particle size encountered in ore treatment, containing valuable ore in particles so fine, as to be carried in suspension by water. De-slime in hydrocyclones before concentrating for maximum recovery of precious metals.

A mixture of finely divided, micron/colloidal particles in a liquid. The particles are so small that they do not settle, but are kept in suspension by the motion of molecules of the liquid. Not amenable to gravity separation. (Bureau of Mines)

Flotation process practiced on a shaking table. Pulverized ore is de-slimed, conditioned with flotation reagents and fed to table as a slurry. Air is introduced into the water system and floatable particles become glom rules, held together by minute air bubbles and positive charged edge adhesion. Generated froth can be discharged into the tailings launder trough or concentrates.

The parts, or a part of any incoherent or fluid material separated as refuse, or separately treated as inferior in quality or value. The gangue or valueless refuse material resulting from the washing, concentration or treatment of pulverized head ore. Tailings from metalliferous mines will appear as sandy soil and will contain no large rock, not to be confused with dumps.

A substance that lowers the surface tension of water and thus enables it to mix more readily with head ore. Foreign substances, such as natural occurring pine oils, vegetation oils and mill grease prevent surface wetting and cause gold to float. Addition agents, such as detergents, (dawn), wetting out is a preliminary step in deflocculating for retarding gold losses.

RP4 shaker table for sale mini gold shaker table RP4 shaker table instructions RP4 shaker table dimensions RP4 gold shaker table RP 4 gravity shaker table utech RP4 shaker table RP 4 gravity shaker table price used RP4 shaker table for sale

Global mining solutions warrants that all mining equipment manufactured will be as specified and will be free from defects in material and workmanship for a period of one year for the RP-4. Providing that the buyer heeds the cautions listed herein and does not alter, modify or disassemble the product, gms liability under this warranty shall be limited to the repair or replacement upon return to gms if found to be defective at any time during the warranty. In no event shall the warranty extend later than the date specified in the warranty from the date of shipment of product by GMS. Repair or replacement, less freight, shall be made by gms at the factory in Prineville, Oregon, USA.

All bearings are sealed and no grease maintenance is required. Do not use paint thinners, or ketones to clean your deck. A small amount of grease should be applied to the adjustable handle which is used for the changing the slope of the deck.

Do not allow the RP-4 to stand in direct sunlight without water. Always keep covered and out of the sun when not in use. Heat may cause the deck to warp. Do not lift or pull on the abs plastic top, always lift using the steel frame. Do not attach anything to the abs plastic top. Do not attach PVC pipe to concentrate discharge tubes, constant vibration from the excess weight will cause stress failure of the plastic.

shaking tables for gold mining and concentration - jxsc machine

shaking tables for gold mining and concentration - jxsc machine

Capacity0-60T/d Feeding concentration15%-30% Feeding size0-2mm Applicationgold shaker table is a gravity separator machine that can separate gold, tin, tungsten, lead, manganese, tantalum, chrome and so on precious metals, nonferrous metals. Serviceshake table design, mineral separation test, process flow design, on site installation.

Gold shaking tables also known as gold shaking table, gold separation table, it is a fine gold recovery equipment common in the gold shaker wash plant, alluvial gold mining plant to separate concentrates, medium concentrates and tailings according to material density and grain size. Gold mining shaker table can not only be used as an independent beneficiation machine, but it often works with jig machine, centrifugal concentrators, sluice box, flotation equipment, magnetic drum separator, spiral classifier, and other ore dressing equipment. Types of gold shaking tablesseated table and suspended table; single-layer shaker and multi-layer shaker; coarse particle (2~0.5mm), fine gold (0.5~0.2mm); rp4 shaker table, 6-s shaker; industrial shaker table, mini gold shaker table, lab shaker table, portable shaker table; etc. Table surface materialsglass-reinforced plastics (glass fiber reinforced polyester resin) and aluminum alloy (laboratory use). Gold shaker table for saleHigh efficiency, separate the gold concentrate and tailings at the same time. 2. Easy to install, operation, and maintenance 3. Adjustable stroke length and speed 4. Low investment, long service life 5. Flexible and portable.

Main partshead, electric motor, slope regulator, ore tank, water tank, compound strip, and lubrication system. Shaking table working principleShaking table mineral separation is an inclined table, the combined action of the symmetrical reciprocating motion of a mechanical slab and the flow of water on a thin inclined plane, causes loose layering and zoning of ore particles on the table surface, thereby causing the mineral separation process to be carried out according to different densities. Gold shaker table manufacturerJXSC supply different types of shaking table concentrator globally, popular in Australia, South Africa, Ghana, Congo placer gold processing plant. JXSC gold shaking tables are a new generation gold concentrating table, with a good effect on fine gold recovery, welcome to visit us do shaking table mineral processing test. Competitive price, good quality equal to Gemini table, MSI mining equipment, Wilfley table. Contact us to get the latest shaking table price. The gold shaker table is a fairly small scale gold mining equipment compared to the ball mill, trommel scrubber, etc.

wilfley laboratory concentrating table for sale

wilfley laboratory concentrating table for sale

The Wilfley Laboratory Concentrating Table, has a capacity of up to 150 lbs per hour on 20 mesh, +200 mesh feed, complete with one interchangeable 18 x 40 right hand molded fiberglass construction tabletop, one sand deck, capacity for complete with motion generator, drive frame, feed, and discharge launder, constant speed drive, adjustable stroke, with 1/2 HP/115 -230 V/1 Ph/60 Hz TEFC motor. Shipped completely assembled on a fabricated steel base.

The Wilfley Shaker Tables are gravity concentrating devices that separate material based upon differing densities ofthe material. They are effective in concentrating high density minerals, such as precious metals, have beenused in metallurgical applications, mineral processing applications, soil remediation and recovering light densityores, such as coal from the heavy density refuse.

The Wilfley Tables have two distinct deck designs available. The sand deck is designed for recovering particlessized from 20 mesh to 200 mesh. The slime deck is designed for recovering fine particles in the rangeof 200 mesh to 325 mesh. The model 13-A is the laboratory sized Wilfley Table and is ideally suited for labor pilot plant test work.

Utilizing the sand deck, a Wilfley Table can concentrate ore in the 20 mesh to +200 mesh particle sizerange. With the slime deck, it will concentrate ore in the 100 mesh to +325 mesh particle size range. Thecapacity for a lab size Wilfley Table (13A) is between 30 and 50 pounds of feed per hour, with lower capacitieswhen using the slimes deck.

The sand deck is efficient in separating high density from low density material (with a difference of 1 SG unit), in the particle size range ranging from 10 mesh to 150 mesh. Slimes decks are used for particles in the 150 to 325 mesh range. However, as one that has used the slime deck, the surface tension of water interferes with recovery in this particle size range. This is probably why 90% of people using the tables use the sand deck.

SHIPPING DIMENSIONS:2440mm Long x 930mm Wide x 1420mmHigh and294kgs FOOTPRINT (IN USE):2350mm x 830mm x 1450mm High DECK DIMENSIONS:Deck surface area of 0.8 m2,Conc Edge 640mm, Tail Edge 1280mm ELECTRICAL SUPPLY:Single phase, 110/230V 50/60Hz.Motor is 0.37kW WATER SUPPLY:Wash Water requirement of 6 to 12 l/min,Feed dilution to ~25-30% w/w solids CAPACITY:Samples: 1-20 Kgs/hour,Continuous: <75Kg/hr

The Wilfley 800 Laboratory table offered provides state of the art separationperformance suited to a wide range of mineral testing, including Tin, tantalum, tungsten, gold, zircon, rutile etc. recovery and concentration applications in Research and University establishments around the world. The drive is self lubricating and run tested in accordance with a fully documented in house QA system.

All steel framework is stainless steel, and the decks (2 x supplied for fine and coarse separations) are gel coated smooth glassfibre construction. Drive is by power connection to speed control inverter, and can be easily adapted tosuit single phase global power supplies. The 0.37kW motor is pre-wired. Single water connection to a manifold provides controlled water flow to feed dilution, wash water bar and water wash down gun. The machine is packed in fully assembled form, ready for positioning and power/water connections. Adjustable rubber pad feet, allow levelling. Manual deck tilt and longitudinal slope by handwheel are possible to optimise testconditions.

The most popular of several similar devices, the Wilfley Shaking Table was developed in the 1890s. It has been in use since and is a common device for concentrating particles in the intermediate range, such as 10-200 mesh (1.65 mm-74 pm) particles for ore and 3-100 mesh (6.7 mm-150 pm) for coal. It is an oblong, shaken deck, typically 1.8- to 4.5-m wide; the deck is partially covered with riffles that taper from right to left. The deck is gently sloped downward in the transverse direction. Feed enters at the upper right and flows over the riffled area, which is continually washed from a water trough along the upper edge of the deck. Heavy particles are concentrated behind the riffles and are transported by a bumping action (of 12-25 mm throw at 200-300 strokes/min) to the left end of the table where flowing film concentration takes place.

Gaudin (1939) identified three principles of operation: hindered- settling, asymmetrical acceleration, and flowing film concentration. The hindered-settling action takes place in the boil behind the riffle. Asymmetrical acceleration, from a spring and from the bumping action supplied by a pitman and toggle arrangement (not unlike that in a Blake-type jaw crusher), not only transports the material behind the riffles but also helps to separate heavy from light materials. Heavy minerals are influenced less by the bumping action than are light ones, and thus the heavier particles have much longer residence times on the deck than do light ones. The bumping action also keeps particles in motion and allows the wash water to remove light particles more thoroughly. Final particle separation is made on the flowing film pan of the deck, which produces a superior heavy mineral concentrate.

The final slope sequence is fine-to-intermediate heavy panicles highest upslope, fine light and intermediate-to-coarse heavy panicles in between, and coarse light panicles furthest downslope. This sequence differs from that of a hindered-settling classifier. Accordingly, it is common practice to have separate shaking tables, each with different settings, treat the various spigot products from a hindered- settling (sorting) classifier.

Whether shaking tables or some other intermediate-to-fine gravity concentration devices are used for roughing, shaking tables are commonly used for cleaning to produce an acceptable concentrate. They are frequently used for upgrading heavy minerals that are not well floated, such as -Win. (6.4 mm) coal particles (as coarse as -10 mm in some instances), small middling streams, and heavy particles to be removed during environmental remediation. The latter is typified by such procedures as removing metal splatter from foundry sands and separating metal grindings from abrasives. In treating relatively coarse -8-mesh (2.4-mm) ore particles, the tables can handle several tons per hour, but for much finer, 150- to 400-mesh (100- to 37-pm) particles, and their capacity may drop to about 0.3 tph. If -10-mm coal is treated, a capacity of 12 tph per deck may be achieved. To clean coal, shaking tables are often stacked two or three decks high, all controlled by the same shaking mechanism.

A. The unit is packed with plastic securing ties holding the table deck shaft, onto its support half bearings, and also securing the gearbox cover and ancillary yellow piping. These must be removed before use. B. THERE IS A SMALL WOODEN BLOCK INSERTED BETWEEN THE DRIVE THRUST YOKE (PART 133) AND THE GEARBOX CASING. This is to prevent movement of internal parts during transport and MUST be removed prior to electrical connection and start-up (see photo)

C. Raise the water manifold support after removal from timber crate and securely bolt in upright position. D. Ensure the head motion is filled with SAE 20W/50 oil (Automotive grade) to the correct level as shown in the maintenance section of this manual before running. E. Adjustable feet mountings (FOUR off) are pre-fitted to the base legs. These will require adjustment to level the machine in its location prior to operation.

The machine is mobile for use, with adjustable feet for levelling prior to operation. Position on a flat level surface ideally at a level suitable for the operator to observe separation and provide sufficient room for the operator to walk around the machine.

Connect the water pipe nozzle to a clear water supply using flexible rubber hose. Typical wash water requirement is 5 10 litres/minute. Recommended feed dilution water is 3 parts water to 1 part solid. i.e. 25% Solids w/w A spray gun and hose are provided to assist with washing off the decks, launders and washing products out of the buckets. DO NOT WASH DOWN THE MOTOR.

Connect the single phase mains supply (refer to technical specification for voltage requirements) to the terminals marked L and N, the earth wire must be connected to the Earth terminal marked E (or the earth stud on the heatsink).

Installing a deck is easy. Simply lower the deck onto the half bearings gently and connect up the deck support shaft to the head motion by tightening the M16 nut with a 24mm spanner. Connect up the water supply to the wash water pipe.

Prepare the table feed by mixing the dry solids with water to give a 25% solids by weight mixture. Some feed stocks are Non wetting and will require addition of a wetting agent to assist settling of these particles which would otherwise float to tailings without having been influenced by their gravitational forces.

The feed material will also respond better on the table if the feed has been sized beforehand so that all particles are in a narrow size particle band. This avoids coarse lights reporting with fine heavies (Stokes Law) and therefore gives better separating performance. The degree of sizing will be specific to the material and should be determined by experimentation.

Feed rate is a function of particle size and specific density differences between particles. This can vary from a few kgs/hour upwards. However, as a general rule, the finer and/or more close density the separation between particles the lower the feed rate will be. (Typical max. 70 kg/hour)

The angle of the table from feed to concentrate end can be adjusted using the hand wheel located under the support beam at the concentrate end of the table. This angle can only be optimised by trial and error. However, the higher the concentrate end the longer the material remains on the table.

The wash water should flow evenly over the deck. The quantity of wash water can only be determined by experimentation. Higher wash water volume results in cleaner concentrates and lower recovery and vice versa.

We have set the mid-point (setting 50) to maximum setting on the inverter to coincide with the most useful range of speeds i.e. 200 300 rpm. The instruction leaflet for the AC Inverter is in the control box.

Re fit deck so shaft sits into shaft supports. Ensure there is a washer either side of the Thrust Yoke Tighten the M16 nut to thrust yoke (24mm spanner) The deck concentrate discharge end should rest approx. mid point in the product launder.

gemeni gold table

gemeni gold table

For sale is the famous Gemeni Table known to generate a bullion grade gold product from low-grade concentrates at high recoveries. A unique table design allows for the production of a gold concentrate that can be directly smelted to bullion.

The Gemeni Table has been specifically designed for the recovery of fine gold to a directly smeltable concentrate. The direct drive system incorporates a geared motor, driving a crank connected to the table deck. The crank includes a spring connection system to absorb overrun. The bump stop system provides a fine-tuning mechanism. Table tuning is achieved by adjustment of a single screw.

The Gemeni shaking table has been specifically designed for the recovery of fine gold to a directly smeltable concentrate. Several models are available to cater for feed rates from 115 kg/h up to 450 kg/h. A laboratory unit is also available, treating 30kg/h. The deck grooves are uniquely designed to optimize the collection of gold particles. The machine can be used to treat low-grade concentrates and still achieve high gold recoveries and grades.

All of the machines are manufactured to strict quality control standards and subject to rigorous testing before shipment. The high-quality materials of construction used in the manufacturing process, the strict quality control standards and ongoing after-sales support set these units apart from their competition and will ensure both trouble-free operation and optimal separation efficiency achieved in every application.

Controlling the water supply is extremely important. Set the main water valve about half open. Make sure the entire working area is wet. Adjust the flow from each ball valve until it creates a nominal 2cm water impact circle on the deck.

While separating gold, use the least amount of water necessary to keep the heavy minerals out of the clean gold pick-up grooves. In some cases where most of the gold is minus 75 m you may wish to make a high-grade concentrate using the clean gold pick-up grooves. The middlings will contain some gold, which may be accumulated and reprocessed to obtain a very high-grade product.

The feed rate, motion and water supply must be coordinated to suit the type of material being processed. A wet feed material of minus 850 m is preferred for highest recovery of clean gold. The feed hopper has 1 height adjustment screw, and two locking clamps. To change the feed height, loosen the locking clamps and turn the height adjustment screw to suit new height, then tighten the locking clamps again.

Check-tighten floor anchor bolts. Check deck surface. Remove any accumulated oils or grease with a very mild detergent and hose down with fresh water. Any accreted build-up may be removed using fine wet and dry (1000 1200 grit) in conjunction with a flat sanding block.

Small depressions, nicks, etc. in the surface can be repaired by filling them with automotive filler and after drying, fine sanding back to the original surface. Larger depressions may interfere with the separation process (depending on the location).

Problem: Thin flaky gold does not settle well and may be lost in the tailing discharge. Solution: 1. Check each corner of base for any loose feet and secure if necessary. 2. Decrease the water volume at the feed end of the table. 3. Lower the rate of feed. 4. Check table motion setup.

Problem: Feed material does not exit the feed hopper evenly Solution: 1. Check that the hopper outlet is square with the deck. 2. Feed one or both of the hoses connected to the top of the manifold into the hopper to reduce the density of the slurry.

shaking tables, knudsen bowl

shaking tables, knudsen bowl

For gold operations we design and manufacture the MD Gemeni range of Shaking Tables. Specifically designed to produce a gold concentrate that can be directly smelted to bullion, the Gemeni Shaking Tables are a cost effective solution.

The Mk2 features a direct, fixed speed drive system and can be operated in batch or continuous mode. The MD Gemeni Shaking Table range is almost invariably used for retreating concentrate from sluices, spirals, conventional shaking tables and centrifugal separators

Mineral Technologies supplies Holman Wilfley wet shaking tables for recovery of precious metals, copper wire, synthetic diamonds, chromite, heavy mineral sands and gold. The different models process feed streams of between 5 and 2,500kg per hour. Holman models are available for all fine minerals concentration (e.g. mineral sands, tin, tungsten, chromite, gold). Wilfley model 7000 is available for metal recycling and reprocessing of WEEE materials (Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment).

Mineral Technologies designs and manufactures the MD Knudsen Bowl. Specifically designed to recover gold from alluvial or hard rock deposits, upgrading and recovery of gold from concentrates from other gravity separation stages, exploration and evaluation of gold deposits ,and other mineral applications including cassiterite and scheelite.

shaking table | gravity separator - mineral processing

shaking table | gravity separator - mineral processing

Shaking tables are one of the oldest gravity separators in the mineral processing industry, capable of handling minerals and coal of 0-2mm.Shaking tables are rectangular-shaped tables with riffled decks across which a film of water flows. The mechanical drive imparts motion along the long axis of the table, perpendicular to the flow of the water. The water carries the particles of the feed in slurry across the riffles in a fluid film. This causes the fine, high density particles to fall into beds behind the riffles as the coarse, low-density particles are carried in the quickly-moving film. The action of the table is such that particles move with the bed towards the discharge end until the end of the table stroke, at which point the table rapidly moves backwards and the particles momentum propels them still forward.

The capacity of the shaking table is about 0.5 t/h. 1.5-2TPH depending on the particle size of the process. In chromite processing and dressing industry, it is usually dozens of shaking table series or parallel installation to deal with excess tons. Therefore, the required installation space, equipment control difficulties due to the increased number of installations and the need for more automated processes have brought new challenges to the process design.

1. Big channel frame, very strong steel base structure( other companies use small channel frame)2. Polypropylene materials feeding chute and collection chute.(other companies dont have )3. Heighten steel stand,making it more convenient when feeding materials.4. Add cover for belt wheel5. Use top quality fiberglass deck,more wear-resisting6. Has various grooves on the table for your choice. We will recommend the best grooves to you according to your gold size.

gold shaker tables

gold shaker tables

911Metallurgist is a recognized supplier of high-quality shaker tables that are precision-made to produce the best gravity separation. Our team of experienced engineers manufactures and assembles our tables at the suppliers factory site where the machines are built to very high standards under strict quality control conditions. The tables are constructed of the highest quality materials on the market and have been tried and tested in the field over many decades. Shaking tables provide the most efficient gravity separation of sub 2mm materials. With over a century of use concentrating minerals, 911Metallurgist units have proved themselves as the market leaders. 911Metallurgist customers are currently using tables to produce concentrates of gold (alluvial and milled ore), tin, tungsten, tantalum, and chromite, where the tables are usually used as the final stage in gravity circuits.

The most generally accepted explanation of the action of a concentrating shaker table is that as the material to be treated is fanned out over the shaker table deck by the differential motion and gravitational flow, the particles become stratified in layers behind the riffles. This stratificaton is followed by the removal of successive layers from the top downward by cross-flowing water as the stratified bed travels toward the outer end of the table. The cross-flowing water is made up partly of water introduced with the feed and partly of wash water fed separately through troughs along the upper side of the table. The progressive removal of material from the top toward the bottom of the bed is the result of the taper of the shaker table riffles toward their outer end, which allows successively deeper layer of material to be carried away by the cross-flowing water as the outer end of the shaker table is approached. By the time the end of the shaker table is reached only a thin layer, probably not thicker than one or two particles, remains on the surface of the deck, this being finally discharged over the end of the table.

The physical and mechanical principles involved in the concentrating action of a shaker table are somewhat more complicated than this explanation implies. Mathematical calculations and experimental data are extremely usefulin studying these principles, but they tell only a part of the story and do not explain the highly efficient separations that tables are known to be capable of making.

Unless the shaker table feed contains a considerable percentage of bone gold and other material of specific gravities intermediate between that of rock and gold, extremely high tabling efficiencies may be expected. If a shaker table could be operated on feed consisting of nothing but a mixture of individual gold and slate particles with a size range of approximately -in. to 48 mesh, an almost perfect separation would be obtainable even on an unclassified feed. With such a feed a well-operated shaker table would probably recover not less than 98 per cent of the gold while eliminating not less than 95 per cent of the slate. This implies almost perfect stratification according to specific gravity without regard to particle size, and it is improbable that it could be attained entirely as a result of the motion of the deck and the flow of water in a plane parallel to the deck surface.The question then arises as to what the other forces or factors are that might contribute significantly to the efficiency of the separation on a table.

As far as is known, no exhaustive studies have ever been made of the principles involved in shaker table concentration by either ore-dressing or gold-preparation engineers. Bird and Davis probably have given more attention to the subject than anyone else, but their experimental work was of a preliminary nature. It was done on minus 4-mesh raw gold and on synthetic mixtures of various products derived from this raw gold by screen sizing and sink-and-float fractionations. They used an apparatus which they called a stratifier. This was a channel-shaped box 12 ft. long, 5 in. deep and 1 in. wide, inside measurements. It was suitably mounted with one end attached to an eccentric and pitman. Stratification experiments were made by filling the box with gold and water and running it at a speed of 360 strokes per minute with the eccentric set to give -in. stroke. The amount of water used was sufficient to permit complete mobility in the bed during the operation of the stratifier. At the end of each run, after the water had been allowed to drain off, one side wall of the stratifier was removed and cross-section samples were taken of the bed to determine by screen-sizing and sink-and-float tests to what extent stratification had been accomplished. Bird and Davis say that their aim is to bring out the fact that stratification, contrary to the common brief, will not account for the separation effected by the gold-washing table, and that cross-flowing water, in addition to removing the top strata found on the table, must also have an important selective action in completing the separation according to specific gravity, both in the upper and in the lower strata found between riffles.

The theory of Bird and Davis as to the selective action of the crossflowing water is that only a part of the water flows over the top of the bed between riffles; the remainder flows through interstices in the bed. These interstices are comparatively large near the top of the bed but become progressively smaller toward the bottom, thus forming in effect V-shaped troughs. In this way the water currents would be relatively swift near the top of the bed and become progressively slower toward the bottom. According to Bird and Davis, With paths for the water such that the top strata are subjected to relatively swift currents and the lower strata are subjected to progressively slower currents, the separation actually occurring on the shaker table can be explained. As the coarse particles at the top receive swift currents and each successively finer size at the lower levels receives slower currents, the velocity of the water matches the size of materials comprising the different strata. Under these conditions a separation occurs in the lower strata similar to that in the top strata, only it takes place more slowly. The slow currents of water within the bed carry the fine gold particles along from riffle to riffle, at a more rapid rate than they do the fine bone and shale particles.

Although stratification due to the nearly horizontal action of the shaker table deck and the flow of water in a plane parallel to it is probably not sufficient to account entirely for the separation made by a table, it is, nevertheless, the fundamental principle of the shaker table just as hindered settling is the fundamental principle of a jig. Although these processes are of diametrically opposite characteristics, there is some possibility that a shaker table may utilize to a minor extent the hindered-settling principle. For convenience in this discussion, the stratification due to the more or less horizontal action of the shaker table deck and flow of water will be referred to as shaker table stratification. This type of stratification is illustrated by the separation that takes place when a box of large and small marbles is shaken and agitated in a horizontal plane in such a way that the large and small marbles collect into separate layers. It is a familiar phenomenon that the small marbles will collect in a layer on the bottom while the large marbles collect in a top layer. The principle of hindered settling can be illustrated by placing a mixture of large and small marbles in an upright cylinder of suitable size with a perforated-plate bottom. If water of sufficient volume and pressure is forced upward through the perforated plate so as to keep the marbles in teeter for a short interval, the marbles will separate into layers, with all the large marbles in the bottom layer and all the small ones on top. The separation is the reverse of that obtained by shaker table stratification. In these illustrations of stratification and hindered settling it is assumed that the marbles are all of the same specific gravity regardless of size. If some marbles have higher specific gravities than others the effect will be to increase their tendency to settle toward the bottom, regardless of whether this tendency favors or opposes the stratification or hindered-settling action. The heavier the small marbles, the easier the separation by shaker table stratification and the more difficult by hindered settling. Conversely, the heavier the large marbles, the more difficult the separation by shaker table stratification and the easier by hindered settling.

In line with principles referred to above, complete separation according to specific gravity could hardly occur on a shaker table or in any other concentrating device as a result of either shaker table stratification by itself or hindered settling by itself when the material to be separated consists of particles varying a great deal in both size and specific gravity. In gold washing the aim is to separate gold particles from particles of refuse according to specific gravity without reference to size of particles, as the ash content of a particle is almost directly proportional to its specific gravity. This separation can be accomplished more effectively by utilizing a combination of shaker table stratification and hindered settling than by relying on either of these two alone, and it is quite conceivable that both processes actually do play a part in the operation of a concentrating table.

To explain how a certain degree of hindered settling might occur on a table, we must assume, as Bird and Davis did, that although a part of the water flows across the top of the bed the remainder of it flows through interstices in the bed itself between adjacent riffles. This seems to be a reasonable assumption and it is one that is also made by Taggart in his discussion of the theory of shaker table concentration. The cross flow of water from one riffle to the next might be somewhat as illustrated in Fig. 8, in which a-b is a line along the surface of the deck perpendicular to the riffles, and C and D are two successive riffles. If the bed is kept in a mobile condition between riffles by the motion of the table, and if the water flows from riffle to riffle approximately as indicated in Fig. 8, it is quite probable that to a certain degree a hindered-settling effect is attained along the upper side of each riffle in a zone indicated by the arrows in Fig. 8. Although the effect of hindered-settling along any individual riffle might be relatively slight, the cumulative effect along the entire series of riffles across the width of the deck might be of sufficient magnitude to influence materially the character of the shaker table separation.

We should expect a hindered-settling effect to be very beneficial as an ally to stratification on a table. The weak point about shaker table stratification is that it tends to deposit all fines at the bottom of the bed, even fine gold of low specific gravity. This fine gold, after penetrating to the surface of the deck, would be guided toward the refuse end by the riffles and would tend to go into the refuse if it were not brought to the top of the bed by some means or other and then carried over the riffles by the cross flow of water and subsequently discharged with the washed gold. Bringing the fine gold to the surface is a function that hindered settling would accomplish very effectively, as one of the fundamentals of hindered settling is that it brings the light, fine particles to the top of the bed. As far as the coarse particles of gold are concerned, evidently they are brought to the surface by stratification and started on their way to the washed-gold side of the shaker table by the cross flow almost instantly after the feed strikes the deck. Anyone who has operated a gold-washing shaker table is familiar with the rapidity of this separation and the way in which it causes all light, reasonably coarse gold particles to be discharged from a rather narrow zone at the head-motion end.

If the suppositions in the foregoing paragraph are correct, the process of separation of gold and refuse on a shaker table may be summarized as follows: Almost immediately after the feed strikes the table, sufficient stratification takes place to bring all coarse, light particles of gold and possibly some coarse particles of refuse to the top of the bed. The cross flow of water carries the coarse gold particles across to the gold-discharge side very rapidly, whereas any coarse particles of refuse at the top of the bed are carried toward the refuse end much more rapidly by the differential motion of the shaker table than they can be transported transversely by the cross flow of water. After removal of the coarse gold, and as the bed progresses diagonally across the table, the shaker table stratification action brings medium-sized gold particles to the surface, and these are removed across the tapering riffles by the wash water. The tapering riffles and continuous removal of material by the cross flow causes the bed to become thinner and thinner toward the refuse end. When the point is reached where the thickness of the bed is less than that of the coarse refuse particles, these particles stick up through the surface of the bed and the transverse pressure exerted on them by the cross flow is diminished, as their surfaces are only partly exposed to this flow. This helps to keep them on their course toward the end of the shaker table and prevents them from being transported by the water in the same direction as the medium-sized gold. Toward the outer end of the riffles the extremely fine gold is being brought to the surface by a hindered-settling action immediately behind each successive riffle. Since the material subjected to this action consists of light, fine particles of gold and heavy refuse of a much larger average particle size, the action should be particularly effective in bringing the fine gold to the surface and allowing it to be carried off into the washed gold by the wash water.

This explanation presumes that to some extent there is a greater opportunity for hindered-settling conditions toward the outer end of each riffle than near the head-motion end. Although this presumption may be questionable, it is possible that, as the bed becomes thinner, a greater proportion of the water follows a coarse along the surface of the deck and contributes to the upward current required for hindered-settling conditions as each riffle is encountered.

In this discussion of shaker table principles shape of particle has been disregarded because it is believed that, as a rule, this is not an important factor in the gold-tabling process. Almost invariably the gold particles are somewhat more cubicle and less platy or flaky than refuse particles, but there is little evidence to show that refuse particles of one particular shape are more difficult to separate on a shaker table than those of some other shape. As for the gold, the shape of particles in sizes suitable for tabling are pretty much alike in all golds. Yancey made a study of the effect of shape of particle. He decided that, for the gold he used in his study, shape of particle is a factor of minor importance in tabling this unsized gold, in so far as the over-all efficiency of the process is concerned. Size and, of course, specific-gravity difference are the major factors.

Of considerably more importance than shape of particle is the particle-size factor. It is evident from the nature of stratification and hindered settling that the separation of gold from refuse becomes more difficult as the range of sizes to be treated in one operation increases. The increasing difficulty as the size range increases is apparent from the following considerations: Assume that we are dealing with two minerals, one of high and one of low specific gravity, and that a mixture of 10-mesh particles of the two minerals will separate readily into two layers by either shaker table stratification or hindered settling, one layer containing all the light particles and the other layer all the heavy particles. Now, if we add two more sizes of heavy particles to the mixture, say 8-mesh and 14-mesh particles, obviously, according to the principles of stratification and hindered settling, the separation by either process into two layers according to the specific gravities of the two minerals will be somewhat more difficult than with the original mixture of nothing but 10-mesh particles. The greater the number of sizes of heavy mineral added to the mixture, the more difficult will be the separation. This reasoning applies likewise to the particles of the light mineral, and it all sums up to the fact that if a shaker table feed contains too wide a range of sizes some of the sizes will be cleaned inefficiently.

In actual practice there is no objection to a considerable variety of sizes in the feed; in fact, if all particles were of the same size there might be some disadvantages, because the bed would be less mobile and less fluid and conditions within the bed would be less favorable for efficient separation than when there is some variety of sizes. For efficient shaker table operation, however, it is important to guard against having too wide a range of sizes in the feed.

In the use of tables in gold preparation, the importance of correct operating conditions can hardly be overemphasized. It is a peculiarity of tables that they give excellent results when correct operating conditions are maintained, but with conditions upset and unbalanced the results are likely to be as far on the bad side as they were on the good side under favorable conditions. This is especially true if the washing problem is somewhat difficult. Naturally, when there is an almost complete absence of bony material in the shaker table feed and the problem is mainly one of separating low-ash gold from slate and other rock, fair results may be obtained even under haphazard operating conditions; but if the washing problem is at all difficult the results are likely to be either extremely good or extremely bad, depending on whether or not correct operating conditions are adhered to. Some of the factors on which operating conditions are dependent will be discussed briefly.

It is a comparatively simple matter to build foundations substantial enough so that they will not have a tendency to shake or vibrate as a result of the motion of the tables. A reinforced-concrete slab need not be more than 6 or 7 in. thick to provide a perfectly rigid foundation, even at a considerable height above the ground, if properly supported on reinforced concrete pillars. It is important to provide tables with substantial, rigid foundations that will not deteriorate after a few years of service. Even a slight shaking or vibrating motion in the foundations is likely to interfere with the action of the tables and lead to serious loss of shaker table efficiency.

One of the first essentials for successful shaker table operation is uniform flow of gold and water to the table. The significance of a steady, uniform feed is apparent from a consideration of the mechanical process involved in the shaker table separation of gold from refuse. The material fed to a shaker table spreads out in a fan-shaped bed. This bed covers virtually the entire shaker table deck. Along the outer edges of the bed at the points of discharge the refuse has separated from the gold and discharges over the end of the shaker table while the gold discharges over the side, assuming that the corner of the shaker table is the dividing point between gold and refuse. However, the amount of material discharging over the side of the shaker table in proportion to that discharged over the end will vary if the rate of feed varies and other conditions remain constant. For instance, if a shaker table is set to give highly efficient results with a feed of 7 tons per hour of a given gold, it will discharge approximately the correct percentage by weight over the refuse end as refuse. If the feed is decreased by several tons per hour, however, without any compensating adjustments being made, a larger percentage of the total material is likely to discharge over the refuse end. This means an unnecessary loss of gold and a low shaker table efficiency. If the feed should be increased by several tons per hour the reverse of this probably would happen, with a certain amount of refuse going into the washed gold and raising its ash content.

Variations in feed rate also affect adversely the conditions for separation of gold from refuse within the bed itself. For instance, for any particular setting of the shaker table when a given gold is treated there is an optimum thickness of bed and an optimum ratio of water to solids in the feed that should be observed when high shaker table efficiency is important. The process of separating particles of refuse from particles of gold cannot be highly efficient except under these optimum conditions, and it is quite obvious that if the feed rate decreases it will tend to decrease the thickness of the bed in certain areas on the table, and the ratio of water to solids will change, as the amount of feed water and wash water are usually more or less independent of the tonnage of solids in the feed. Such interference with the actual separating function of the shaker table is likely to cause an incomplete separation.

With further reference to optimum separating conditions within the bed itself, it is important to maintain always the right kind of distributionthe term distribution in this connection referring to the shaker table distribution of the material with which the constantly moving bed on the shaker table is maintained. The shaker table distribution should be such that the quantity of solids discharged per unit length along the side of the shaker table decreases gradually from the head-motion end toward the refuse end. It should be observed in qualification of this statement, however, that it is usually advantageous to have the washed-gold discharge start at a point a foot or so away from the cornerthat is, the corner directly across from the feed box. Usually there is a large volume of water discharging from this corner zone, but ordinarily it is preferable to have almost no solids discharging with it. Beginning at the end of this corner zone, however, there should be a very heavy discharge of washed gold in the first 3 or 4 ft., and the amount discharged from each successive zone from there to the corner at the refuse end should decrease gradually. There should be some discharge of solids virtually all the way to the corner, but as the corner is reached the discharge should be almost zero. Under these conditions there will always be some refuse material discharging immediately around the corner, but the amount of refuse from the first 6 or 8 in. next to the corner on the refuse end should be negligible in quantity. The bulk of the refuse should discharge over a zone of considerable width, starting not less than 1 or 2 ft. up from the corner.

Although this more or less ideal distribution is fairly easy to attain with an average raw-gold feed, it may be more difficult of attainment with a type of feed in which there is an abnormally high percentage of refuse, especially if the refuse consists mostly of high-ash bone gold. This condition often is encountered in the re-treatment of middlings from primary stages of washing.

However, regardless of the character of the feed, the nearer this ideal distribution is approached, the better the results will be. Once the correct balance between shaker table adjustments and the volume of feed gold, feed water, and wash water has been found, good distribution will maintain itself automatically as long as none of the operating factors are allowed to change. It is self-evident, however, that an increase or decrease in the amount of water going to the tableeither feed water or wash waterwill upset this distribution just as quickly as a change in the feed tonnage unless other compensating adjustments are made.

It is of paramount importance, therefore, to have a feed system that will eliminate as far as possible fluctuations or variations in the rate at which gold and water are fed to the table. With regard to the gold, not only the quantity but also the quality and physical characteristics should be kept constant. This is true particularly with reference to the size distribution of the feed. Any change in size distribution, such as may result from segregation in an improperly designed bin ahead of the tables, can upset the distribution of the material on the tables. The only sure way to get a steady feed is to feed the gold to the shaker table by means of a positive-type feeder, such as a belt, screw conveyor, apron feeder, or rotary star or paddle feeder. A sliding gate device instead of mechanical feeders is almost certain to be unsatisfactory, even when a water line can be placed inside the gate to keep the material moving. The mechanical feeders should be provided with variable-speed drive for adjusting the feed to the desired tonnage. This adjustment cannot be made satisfactorily by varying the size of the opening through which the gold discharges onto the feeder. The feed bin should be of such size and design as to eliminate segregation as far as possible. Any attempt to dispense with feed bins is likely to result in unsatisfactory operating conditions, although it is being done at many plants. A customary practice, for instance, is to draw a middling product from a set of jigs and after dewatering run it through a crusher directly to the tables. Such procedure nearly always provides a variable feed for the tables whereas a constant feed could be obtained by dropping the discharge from the crusher into a bin and having mechanical feeders between the bin and the tables.

Changes in the size distribution of a feed are sometimes caused by difficulties in the dry screening of run-of-mine gold. If dry screening is used and the amount of surface moisture in the run-of-mine gold varies, a finer shaker table feed will be produced when the gold is excessively moist than when it is dry. Naturally, particles near the upper size limit will go through the screen readily if the gold is dry whereas if the gold is wet these particles are likely to go into the oversize. The resultant variation in the size character of the feed can interfere with shaker table efficiency as readily as segregation in the bin. Wet screening eliminates this difficulty.

In connection with the problem of segregation and variations in the size-consist of shaker table feed, a comparatively recent development at a shaker table plant in Alabama is worth noting. This plant went into operation at the Praco mine of the Alabama By-Products Corporation in 1944. Incorporated in this plant is a newly-designed system for reducing to a minimum the problem of segregation. The 16 tables in this plant are provided with small individual feed hoppers of about 1500 lb. capacity. Transfer of the 7/16 in- to 0 shaker table feed gold to these hoppers from 100-ton storage bin is accomplished by means of a horizontally operated bucket conveyor, tradenamed Side-Kar Karrier by its manufacturer. After passing under the 100-ton storage bin where the buckets are filled up with gold through multiple openings in the bottom of the bin, this conveyor moves on a track laid in a horizontal plane across the tops of the 16 feed hoppers. Each individual hopper is spring-suspended and as gold is withdrawn out of the bottom by the shaker table feeder, the hopper rises due to decrease in weight. As it rises it automatically engages a tripping mechanism in the conveyor buckets overhead, causing the buckets to discharge their load into the hopper. Thus a few buckets at a time are dumped into each hopper and the effect of small increments dumped at frequent intervals is obtained, giving a flow of gold to each shaker table of more average and uniform size-consist than when gold is run in a continuous stream into a large feed bin until the bin is filled.

As a further deterrent to segregation, the gold is fed from the bottom of the hopper to the shaker table by means of a tapered auger so as to draw continuously from the entire width of the hopper and avoid segregation within the hopper. For further details of this plant, the reader is referred to an article published in 1944.

With regard to the water supply for a table, it is just as important to have a steady, uniform flow of water as of gold. The water pipes and valves should be so arranged in a shaker table plant that each shaker table gets its flow of water quite independently of the others. If a common water header is used it should be big enough so that, regardless of how the water adjustments are changed for one shaker table or group of tables, the volume of flow to the others will not be changed. The source of the water supply, of course, should be maintained with a fairly constant pressure or head. This can be accomplished more effectively by using a gravity tank at a considerable height above the level of the tables than by drawing water directly from a pumping circuit. Clean water is to be recommended strongly in preference to dirty water from the washer circuit. Wash water sometimes carries enough solids in suspension to interfere with the flow through pipes and valves, and accumulation of solids sometimes may stop a valve entirely. Under these conditions the flow of water varies almost continuously and there will be too much one minute and not enough the next. The solids in the water are likely also to be sufficiently abrasive so that frequent replacements of the valves and fittings will be necessary. All of these troubles can be avoided entirely by using a supply of clean water for the tables.

The riffling, shaker table speed, length of stroke, and other adjustments, such as shaker table slope, longitudinal, and cross slope, must in each case be balanced by the various other operating factors, so as to get the desired results. The speed that the shaker table manufacturer provides for when he supplies each shaker table with its individual motor drive is usually quite satisfactory. This speed is usually between 250 and 300 r.p.m. All shaker table head motions are designed so that the length of stroke is adjustable within a certain range. This range usually is from to 1 in., or slightly over. The coarsest shaker table feed requires the longest stroke. For a raw-gold feed of average size, say 5/16-in. to 0, a stroke of 7/8 to 1 in. usually is satisfactory. A slightly longer stroke on such a feed usually will give about the same shaker table efficiency with slightly higher capacity. A report giving experimental data as to the effect of speed, stroke, and other variables on shaker table efficiency has been published by the Bureau of Mines. More recent work published by the Illinois Geological Survey emphasizes the importance of the longitudinal slope and the speed of reciprocation, two factors which are not readily adjustable on ordinary commercial tables. A slower speed is found to improve the performance, in opposition to the results reported by the Bureau of Mines. The discrepancy is noted by the author, and has not been explained.

As to type of riffling, it seems to be generally agreed now that high riffles are advantageous in the tabling of bituminous gold, and it is customary to have the main riffles start with a height of not less than in. at the feed end and taper to a feather edge at the outer end. The -in. height probably represents a minimum; riffles 2 in. high are now used on the Deister Plat-O tables; and these tables are recommended by the manufacturer for the cleaning of shaker table feeds as fine as 3/8-in. to 0. There is a great deal of variation in the spacing of high riffles. In some designs there is only one shallow riffle between two higher riffles. Another design, intended to emphasize the importance of the pool effect, provides four or more shallow riffles between successive high riffles. About the only suggestion that can be made with regard to riffling is that the coarser the feed, the more advantageous are high riffles. Unless the shaker table feed is extremely fine, with maximum particles size less than in., there seems to be no good argument for the main riffles to be less than or 1 in. high. On such gold, riffles lower than this would tend to reduce capacity. With coarser feeds higher riffles can be used advantageously.

As to the comparative merits of wooden riffles and rubber riffles, one can be substituted for the other without changing the shaker table results appreciably. It seems evident, however, that the efficiency, as far as ash reduction and gold recovery are concerned, is slightly less with rubber covering and riffles than with linoleum covering and wooden riffles. The difference would be only a few tenths of one per cent less ash at the same recovery, using the linoleum and wooden riffles. Usually this is more than offset by the greater operating economy of the rubber covering and riffles. Although the rubber combination costs about twice as much as linoleum and wood, it is supposed to last 10 or 12 times as long.

In summarizing, the principal adjustments and factors to be considered in putting a shaker table into operation on a certain feed, are: feed rate, as to volume of both gold and water; slope of the shaker table (longitudinal and cross slope); riffling system, shaker table speed, and length of stroke. A shaker table installation should be so designed that any or all of these adjustments and factors can be changed easily to meet requirements during the procedure of placing the tables in operation. In starting a shaker table plant, the main objective should be to find the combination of shaker table adjustments and operating factors that will give the correct shaker table distribution described previously in the discussion of feed uniformity. The quantity of water to be used is from two to three times as much by weight as the feed of gold, but it should be adjusted as nearly as possible to the minimum amount that will keep the products discharging uniformly from all zones around the edge of the table. To most nearly attain the ideal distribution on the table, it is usually necessary to have the supporting channels under the shaker table deck several inches higher at the refuse end than at the feed end. As to the cross slope, it should be the minimum at which it is possible to attain good distribution. In other words, the flatter the shaker table is in the crosswise direction, the better, provided the distribution is good. The length of stroke and shaker table speed should be adjusted so that the bed will be kept in a state of uniform flow and mobility all over the deck. On the raw-gold feed, these operating conditions can be attained fairly easily, but it may be more difficult in the treatment of middling products. Difficulties sometimes can be overcome by making slight changes in the riffling and by use of auxiliary water sprays directed at certain areas in the bed. Anything that is done should be directed toward getting and maintaining a distribution on the shaker table as nearly ideal as possible.

The launder system in a shaker table plant should be so designed that a splitter can be used for dividing the washed gold from the refuse at some point along the washed-gold side instead of at the corner, if desired. The correct shaker table distribution will sometimes give too high an ash content in the washed gold if the split between washed gold and refuse is made at the corner, and in such instances the best solution is an adjustable divider or splitter that can be set at any desired point along the washed-gold side.

The tonnage a shaker table will handle effectively depends to a great extent on the washability and size of the gold. In treating an ordinary 5/16-in. to 0 raw-gold feed, high efficiency with respect to both cleaning and recovery usually can be obtained with a feed of as much as 10 tons per hour. High efficiency in this case means an efficiency that could not be improved appreciably by lowering the tonnage. If the gold is extremely easy to wash, higher tonnages can be cleaned with equally good efficiency. The claim sometimes is made by shaker table manufacturers that their tables will handle efficiently as much as 15 to 20 tons per hour of 5/16-in. to 0 gold. On an average feed of this size, however, feed-tonnages of more than 10 tons per hour are likely to cause a decrease in efficiency. With feeds as coarse as -in. or 1-in. to 0, it is not unusual to treat from 12 to 15 tons an hour per table. Modern tables will handle minus 1/8-in. feed at the rate of 7.5 tons per hour.

One of the important considerations frequently overlooked in the design of a shaker table plant is that the making of necessary shaker table adjustments is extremely difficult unless representative samples can be taken easily. Often the more or less permanent washed-gold and refuse launders around the tables are laid out in such a way that it is next to impossible to get dependable samples of the products from individual tables. Either the launders should be so designed that they can be partly removed during sampling, or they should be built with enough spacing between the edge of the shaker table and the launder so that the necessary sampling pans for taking zone samples can be inserted at any place around the table. Provisions should also be made for conveniently sampling the composite washed gold and composite refuse from each table, in addition to the feed to individual tables. Without dependable samples it is sometimes difficult to tell whether or not an individual shaker table is operating correctly; and, owing to the segregation of products into various discharge zones, haphazard sampling is sometimes worse than no sampling at all.

The laboratory shaking table is widely used for the gravity separation of sands too fine to treat by jigging. The physical principles utilised in tabling must be understood if preparation of feed and application of control are to be efficient.

Consider a number of spheres rolling down a slightly tilted plane under the urging influence of a flowing film of water. Some of the spheres (shaded) in Fig. 170 represent heavy mineral and others (white) light gangue. The largest sphere travels fastest and the smallest one slowest, under the combined influence of streaming action and gravitational pull. Of two spheres having the same density, the larger moves faster. Of two having the samediameter, if the slope is relatively gentle and the hydraulic urge relatively strong, the lighter sphere travels faster. If during the otherwise free downward travel of these spheres the whole plane is moved sideways, then the horizontal displacement of the spheres varies in accordance with the lengthof time they take to roll down. This is represented here on the right, which shows that the largest light sphere has undergone the least horizontal displacement because it travelled fastest, whilst the smallest heavy one has been carried furthest to one side. From this it is seen that if a suitable displacing movement can be applied to a plane, the feed can be spread into bands according to the size and density of its constituent particles. If these bands are collected into separate vessels as they leave this deck, the feed will have been segregated into three main products:

A particle light enough to respond mainly to the hydraulic influence of the flowing film of water moves down-plane with little horizontal displacement. A typical particle, unlike a sphere. will either slide or skip downward, rather than roll, provided it is reasonably free to move. Apart from the limited use of the automatic strake in concentrating metallic gold, continuous lateral displacement across the sorting plane cannot handle an adequate tonnage and is not used in the mill.

With the Laboratory shaking table a reciprocating side motion is applied to the sloping surface or deck down which the pulp is streaming. If this shaking action was applied symmetrically in both directions across the stream, each particle would move an equal distance in each direction, and separation into bands would not occur. The displacing stroke must be applied gently, so as not tobreak the grip between particle and deck. The deck accelerates, and in doing so imparts kinetic energy to the material on it. Then the deck motion is abruptly reversed so that it is snatched away from under the particles resting immediately above it. These continue to skid sideways (across the flow) until their kinetic energy has been exhausted. It is therefore essential to provide a differential side-shake which builds up gently and then breaks contact between deck and load.

This is provided by the shaking mechanism or head motion of the shaker table. The slower the particle travels downstream, the further it slides sideways under the influence of the shaking motion. Thus far discussion has been limited to a series of individual particles fed to the deck from one starting-point. If, instead, a layer several particles deep is fed from a starting-line, it becomes possible to handle a greatly increased load on the deck. The operating conditions have now changed. In the cross-section through such a layer, as seen normal to the direction of shake, the mixed feed first stratifies itself under the disturbing influence of the shaking action. The smallest and heaviest particles reach the deck, the largest and lightest stay uppermost, with a mixture of large heavy and small light grains between. This arrangement exposes the large, light particles to the maximum sluicing force of the film of water as it streams down the laboratory table. a force that can be controlled in intensity by varying the volume of water used and the slope of the deck. It is thus possible to exert some degree of skimming action to accelerate the downward movement of the uppermost layer without disturbing those below. The particles next to the deck are pressed to it by the material above, and therefore can grip it with greater firmness than would be given by their own unaided weight. They thus are able to cling during fast sideways acceleration, and are only freed and set skidding by the sudden reverse action.

The overlying particles have only a precarious hold. This aids the discriminating action of each stroke. The bottom particle travels furthest, breaks free at stroke reversal and is the first to skid. Those above it sway backward and forward and consequently receive less lateral movement. This accentuates the separating action by giving the bottom (heavy mineral) particles the maximum horizontal displacement per stroke and the upper (light gangue) grains the least. This aids the sorting discrimination. If the feed has been properly prepared by hydraulic classification, ensuring that all the grains have similar settling characteristics through vertical currents, film sizing can now take advantage of the variation in cross-section between the heavy andlight particles in each stratum, sweeping down the lighter and leaving the heavier untouched. The particles thus segregated are then removed in separately discharged fractions, called bands, at the far end of the tables deck. It would not be possible to form and maintain an evenly distributed thick bed of the kind called for by the foregoing considerations if a smooth plane deck were used. Riffles are therefore employed to provide protected pockets in which stratification can take place. They are usually straight and parallel with the direction of shake, but may be curved or slanted. The deck, instead of being plane, may be formed to provide pools in which the feed can stratify. The riffles must:

Thus (a) rules out as bad practice the use of stopping riffles set high above the rest, sometimes used to arrest and spread entering feed. If all riffles are not of similar initial height the stratifying action and transfer between them is upset. Smooth delivery is best achieved with a feed box integral with the moving deck, and aligned with the vibrator. It should let the feed down gently to the head riffles. Items (b), (c), and (d) are arguments against the use of curved riffles, which increase wall friction and upset stratifying action. A badly maintained mechanical action and deck coupling may mislead the engineer into redesigning his riffle plan, just as an incorrect stance may cause the unwary golfer to modify his swing instead of standing correctly. In the standard Wilfley table the riffles run parallel with the long axis, and are tapered from a maximum height on the feed side (nearest the shaking mechanism) till they die out near the opposite side, part of whichis left smooth. Where the riffles stand high, a certain amount of eddying movement occurs, aiding the stratification and jigging action in the riffle troughs.

As the load of material is jerked across the Laboratory Shaker Table, the uppermostlayer ceases to be protected from the down-coursing film of water, owing to the taper of the riffle. It is therefore swept or rolled over into the next riffle below. In this way the uppermost layer of sand is repeatedly sluiced with the full force of the current of wash water, riffle after riffle, until it leaves the deck. This water-film is thinnest and swiftest while climbing over the solid riffle, and the slight check and down pull it receives while passing over the trough between two riffles helps to drop any suspended solids into that trough.

At the bottom of the riffle-trough, then, the particles in contact with the deck are moving crosswise as the result of the mechanical shaking movement. At the top they are exposed to the hydraulic pressure of a controllable film of water sweeping downwards. In the trough of the riffle the combined forces-stratification, eddy action, and jigging-are arranging them according to density and volume.

Provided the entering particles have been suitably sorted and liberated, good separation can be achieved on sands in any appropriate size range from an upper limit of about i to a lower one of some 300 mesh. The difference in density and mass between particles of concentrate and gangue determines the efficient size range which must be maintained by hydraulic classification or free-fall sorting of the feed. A further separating influence is applied hydraulically along each riffle as the water in it gathers energy from the decks movement. As it gathers speed in the forward half of its cycle, the water flowing along the trough parallel to the axis of vibration is accelerated. When the decks direction is abruptly reversed this flow is only gently checked relatively to the more positive braking force exerted on the skidding particles in the riffle. There is thus a mildly pulsed sluicing action across the Laboratory Shaker Table, in addition to the steady stream at right angles to it, down-slope. This cross-stream helps the particles to travel along the riffles.Since separation depends to a large degree on the hydraulic displacement of the particle, its shape influences its reaction. Flakes of mica, though light, work down and cling to the deck, and may be seen moving nearly straight across, even at the unriffled end where they meet the full force of the stream. Where there is no marked influence in density between the constituent minerals of a pulp, the shape factor aids a flat particle to move along the deck to the concentrates zone, and under like conditions helps an equi-dimensional one to move down-slope toward the tailings discharge. Shape factor can therefore help tabling in some cases, and be disadvantageous in others, depending on whether it reinforces or opposes differences in size between the classified particles of value and tailing.

Small scale table concentration tests have many critics. Many metallurgists consider that such tests are of problematical value because of the difficulties involved in conducting and interpreting them.Many kinds of small-scale ore dressing tests are difficult to conduct, and there is, perhaps, good reason for thinking that table concentration tests are amongst the most difficult.Interpretation of results from small-scale tests is the responsibility of the metallurgists and engineers in charge, and it is often held that small-scale table concentration tests are particularly difficult to interpret.

Firstly, there are difficulties due inherently to the small-scale nature of the operations; for example the smaller width of all mineral bands on the table and the less complete separation due to the shorter length of travel between the feed and discharge points.

Secondly, there are the effects of batch operation owing to the fact that the mineral particles behave differently during the initial period when the sample is just beginning to spread over the table, the middle period when feed and discharge are even and continuous, and the final stage, when the last of the sample has been added and the table is beginning to empty itself.

If the test must be conducted as a small-scale batch test, difficulties due to the first two causes are inevitable, but by proper attention to the equipment and technique used for laboratory table concentration tests, difficulties due to inevitable causes may be minimized.

Unfortunately, it is common to find that insufficient attention has been given to the careful design of laboratory concentrating tables, and it is believed that difficulties arising from this cause, combined with crude testing techniques, are largely responsible for difficulties in interpreting results. If proper attention is given to the points mentioned, there seems no reason why the results obtained should not be a reliable guide to the optimum performance of a commercial plant.

The present paper describes the development of the concentrating table used in the laboratory operated jointly by the Mining Department of the University of Melbourne and the Ore Dressing Section of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization. Although the paper contains some discussion of the technique of table concentration testing, the bulk of it is devoted to describing the steps taken to improve the mechanical rigidity of the table and the convenience of its adjustments and controls.

In order to comprehend the reason for the modifications made, it is helpful to consider, first, how a mixed feed of dense and light particles, say galena and quartz, behaves in an ordinary batch table concentration test.

It is supposed that the feed rate is uniform throughout the test and that the side slope and cross water are adjusted so that when stable conditions have been established on the table, the line of demarcation between galena and quartz will be on the concentrate end of the table 2 in. from the corner.

Galena is scarce because the quartz moves more quickly; quartz appears well up the slope of the table because the forces tending to wash it across the table are not fully operative. There is little galena on the riffled portion of the deck, so that more quartz particles remain in the riffles where they have little opportunity to be forced by the galena to the top of the bed in the riffles, from where they would be washed down by the cross water.

As the feed continues to flow, more galena appears on the table, and when stable conditions have been established, the line of demarcation between galena and quartz moves down to a point 2 in. from the corner. This condition continues until feeding ceases. Shortly it will be noted that there is scarcely any quartz on the table and that the line of demarcation between the galena and the remaining quartz moves down the concentrate end of the table towards the corner.

The first effect occurs because the quartz moves across the table more quickly than the galena. The second effect occurs because the cross water washes the galena further down the unriffled part of the deck since there is practically no quartz to stop it.

It will be found, then, that if in a batch test a table is fed- uniformly and neither the cross, water nor the side slope is altered, the line of demarcation between concentrate and tailing will start at a point well up the concentrate end of this table, move gradually to a stable point and, at the end of the test, move rather quickly to a point much closer to the corner of the table.

If a clean separation is to be obtained, it will be necessary to move a splitter to follow this line of demarcation. However, it is common to find the movement of the separation point so great that moving a splitter is not alone sufficient to cope with the large changes which occur. In this case it is necessary to alter the side slope of the table.

However, the head motion used on the laboratory table had been in service for a number of years, and had become badly worn. As alternative plans for a replacement were being considered, Mount Isa Mines Ltd. offered to donate to the laboratory a commercial Deister Plat-O head motion in excellent mechanical condition. This offer was gratefully accepted. For compactness, a frame was built to accommodate the table deck directly above the case containing the head motion, the movement being transferred through a lever arm pinned to the frame. The arrangement is illustrated in Figs. 1 and 3.

Lever arm lengths can be adjusted readily to give a stroke length ranging from 5/16 in- to 1 in. The sharpness of the kick can also be adjusted. To date no experiments on the effect of either of these variables have been conducted. The speed is constant at about 300 strokes per min. and adjustment can only be effected by changing the driving pulley.

The frame is of welded construction. The base is made of 5 in. channels, and the rest of the frame of 3 in. channels and 2 in. and in. angles. The ample sections combined with the cross-bracing give a rigid frame.

A deck of this kind has only one major defect for test workthe difficulty of avoiding contamination of successive runs owing to solids lodging between the riffles and the linoleum surface. This trouble has been minimized by using a waterproof adhesive as well as the nails to attach the riffles. Another source of contamination in the old model table was a flat-bottomed feed box which was difficult to clean. The feed box now used was made from a short length of 1 in. dia. pipe and may be seen in Fig. 1. This type of feed box is very easy to clean.

The deck is supported on four slipper rods which slide in seats arranged in independent pairs at each end of the table. Each pair of seats can move freely about a pivot, the pivots being aligned accurately. This arrangement provides a very rigid support, which accommodates itself easily to change of slope. A clear view of the rods may be seen at A, in Fig. 2, while the seats may be seen at A in Fig. 3.

The deck is connected to the head motion through a shackle and pin, (A and B, Fig. 5), while a spring attached at an angle beneath the deck keeps the slipper rods seated. A crank operated by hand-lever (A in Fig. 4) applies tension to the spring. Either one of two decks with slightly different riffling may be used. To remove the deck, spring tension is released by turning the hand-lever, and detaching the spring. The pin A (Fig. 5) is removed from the shackle B and the deck lifted off. To fit the other deck, these operations are repeated in reverse order. The changing of decks can be effected in about two minutes.

The table is provided with two adjustable splitters, a concentrate-middling splitter on the concentrate end of the table, and a middling-tailing splitter on the tailing side of the table. An external view of the splitters is shown in Fig. 6.

The concentrate end of the table is faced with a 1 in. wide strip of 16 gauge brass sheet, its edge being flush with the edge of the linoleum deck surface. The splitter itself is a vertical sheet of brass, the top edge of which is about 3/8 in. below the deck surface. The splitter and its small attached launder are mounted on a split block which slides along two brass rods mounted on brackets underneath the table. The halves of the block are held against the rods by crossed leaf springs tensioned by a small knurled nut. The method of attachment is shown in Fig. 2. The cutter moves readily when slight pressure is applied, and maintains any set position.

The cross slope of the table is adjusted by a lever arm attached to the pair of slipper rod seats at the concentrate end. A second lever operates a locking nut at the back of the pivot. The two lever arms are shown in Fig. 4. When using this simple two lever arrangement, it has been found that when the locknut is released the cross slope of the table may change suddenly and jerkily. To improve this feature, a vertical screw type of adjustment is being attached to the lever arm B.

When the cross slope of the table is changed, a couple is applied to the bridge bar (D, Fig. 2) connecting the two slipper rods at the head motion end. To avoid applying a twist to the shackle E, the nut F tightens onto a shoulder on the pin G and not onto the bridge bar. The clearance is so small (0.001 in.) that there is no perceptible slackness although the shackle can twist quite freely.

The top edge of the table deck is not parallel to the axis about which the deck is tilted. Consequently, if the launder distributing cross water were attached to the deck, the water distribution would change when the cross slope was changed. To avoid this, the launder has been attached to the main frame by two pieces of 1 in. x 3/16 in. flat steel bent appropriately. The launder is attached by hinges and may be folded up out of the way to facilitate changing of decks. The method of attaching the water launder is made clear in Fig. 4.

A common method of feeding a table for batch test work is by scoop. The discussion given of the behaviour of dense and light minerals in a batch test in which the feed is quite regular enables conditions to be foreseen when the table is fed by scoop. Suppose a somewhat extreme example in which a scoopful is fed onto the table in five seconds, and successive scoopsful added every 30 seconds subsequently. In the period immediately after adding each scoopful, the quartz added will move more rapidly than the galena, and so will push the line of demarcationbetween concentrate and tailing up. Subsequently, the corresponding amount of galena will arrive at the table edge, and so will push the line of demarcation down. This cycle will be repeated for each scoopful added. The result will be that the line of demarcation between concentrate and tailing will fluctuate. The extent of the movement will depend on the irregularity of the feed, and although with care the fluctuation may be minimized, the operation will inevitably be tedious and time-consuming, and even the best result will leave much to be desired.

Experiments with a launder feeding method have shown that it has decided advantages. The V-bottom launder used is shown in Fig. 1. The feed is spread fairly uniformly along the bottom of the launder, and the rate of feed regulated by the rate of feeding water to the head of the launder. About 90% of the feed will flow without further alteration, but some additional wash water isnecessary near the end of a run to clean down the sides of the launder.

More elaborate launder feeding methods with progressing water jets, etc., have been proposed, but although these would appear to have further advantages, the simple method described has proved satisfactory. It does not give absolutely regular feed, but the changes occur, gradually and are easy to cope with.

Experiments with continuous circulation have also been conducted. The arrangement is shown, in Fig. 7. Concentrate, middling and tailing separate on the table and are deflected into a common pump, which discharges the, mixed feed into the dewatering cone shown. The overflow runs to waste and the discharge returns to the table. This system gives far more regular feed than any other method tried. It works very well for demonstration purposes, but quantitative tests have not yet been undertaken. The method proposed is to establish equilibrium conditions, and then take timed samples.

Three product hoppers are used, two small hoppers which are fixed, to the table framework being provided for concentrate and middling, while the tailing is collected in a large hopper fitted into a framework mounted onwheels. The large mobile hoppers of 30 gal. capacity are extremely useful in the laboratory for many purposes, such as the collection and settlement of slime, collection of jig and table tailings, and in fact any large quantities of ore pulp.

Both the fixed and mobile hoppers are closed with rubber bungs from inside, the bungs being fixed to long brass rods with T-handles. The clearance below the hopper outlets is sufficient for a 3 gal. bucket.

A laboratory concentration table was modified by incorporating a sturdier head motion, main frame and supports, and altering the controls so as to make them positive, convenient and independent of each other.

The advantages from the modifications to the table construction cannot readily be expressed in quantitative results. The important effect is that every operation, such as feeding the table, adjusting the side slope or product splitters, and handling the products, is easier, and the table itself is much less prone to erratic disturbances due to lack of rigidity in the framework, supports and adjustments. It is felt that these substantial mechanical improvements are bound to express themselves in improved metallurgical performance.

gold shaker table sales,shaking table,gold separator - jxsc

gold shaker table sales,shaking table,gold separator - jxsc

The gold shaker table is a flow film separation equipment, that usually used to separate the gold particle grains from the ore material in the gold processing plant. Shaking table concentrator is developed from the early stationary and movable chute box, from percussion shaking table ( used in the coal mining industry) to the wilfley table and mineral processing eccentric rod shaker table, various type of gravity table separators have been developed and applied, especially in the recovery process of some precious metal like gold. Contact us to get the latest shaker table price.

Capacity: 0.1-2tph Feeding size: 0-2mm Applications: Gold, Tin, Chrome, Tantalum-niobium, Tungsten, Iron, Manganese, Nonferrous metal ore, and so on. Introduction: Gold shaker washing table can obtain the fine-grained materials, and separate the high-grade concentrate, taillights and intermediate mineral products during once processing. According to the different grain size of the ore material, it can be divided into coarse sand (2 - 0.074mm), fine sand (0.5 - 0.074mm), and ore slurry (0.074 - 0.02mm), the suited gold separate machine is varied with the material particle size, the main differences among them are the shaking table surface sluice, height, angle and so on. Main parts: table head, motor drive, stand, working bed, support frame, water tank, feed chute, angle adjuster device, spring, etc.

Types of shaking table: 1. Shake table for sale classified by uses: ore sand, ore slurry, mineral processing, coal dressing. 2. Classified by structure ( table head, surface, supporting frame ): 6-S shaker table, Gemini table, CC-2 gold wash table, spring concentrating table, centrifugal table, rp 4 shaker table, and so on shaking table mineral separation. 3. Classified by deck: single deck shaker table, the multideck table has double decks, three decks, four decks, six decks, and more.

Working principle of the shaker table: As a gravity separator machine, the shaking table separates the minerals mainly dependent on their differences of gravity, density, shape, etc, in addition, the water flow speed, slurry density, surface angle and so on variables also matters. The target mineral grains, from fine to coarse and light to heavy, can be classified by weight. The shaking table concentrator not only can be an independent beneficiation machine, but also connect with jig machine, flotation, magnetic separator, centrifuge concentrator, spiral concentrator, belt conveyor and so on.

Mining Equipment Manufacturers, Our Main Products: Gold Trommel, Gold Wash Plant, Dense Media Separation System, CIP, CIL, Ball Mill, Trommel Scrubber, Shaker Table, Jig Concentrator, Spiral Separator, Slurry Pump, Trommel Screen.

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