indirect-fired rotary kiln in your rotary kiln business

indirect-fired rotary kiln in your rotary kiln business

Indirect-fired rotary kiln has a combustion chamber on the peripheral barrel. The heat generated by the combustion of flue gas is transferred to the material through the cylinder. The material is calcined at high temperatures, and the calcined product is discharged from the discharge valve. The exhaust gas is treated or emptied or utilized. The indirect-fired rotary kiln is suitable for the production of various materials requiring indirect continuous heating.

Our indirect-fired rotary kiln can use different fuels for heating, in addition to traditional coal, oil, gas, it can also use electricity for heating. Among them, the electric heating rotary kiln is in huge demand and is highly praised by the market. One is because the heat source is clean and does not cause environmental pollution, and the other is because the power supply is more convenient and efficient.

When the indirect-fired rotary kiln is used to calcine the catalyst and molecular sieve. It can make s sure that the purity of the product. This is because the multi-zone temperature can be set coordinatedly in order to complete the reaction such as dehydration or unit cell shrinkage.

The indirect-fired rotary kiln can recycle the condensed water, combustible gas and biochar left by the calcined sludge. The indirect rotary kiln chemically reacts sludge in a closed, anaerobic, non-combustible and high-temperature state. Under the reaction of dry distillation and thermal decomposition, sludge goes through pyrolysis, dehydrogenation, thermal condensation, gasification and carbonization, so that the water in the sludge becomes condensed water, and the organic matter in the sludge is converted into a combustible gas, which is then recycled.

Indirect-fired rotary kiln equipment has been widely recognized as the most suitable solid bulk material handling the machine in the past 100 years. The common type of rotary kiln equipment is the direct-fired rotary kiln. The direct-fired rotary kilns character is that the combusted materials are directly in contact with the raw material being processed. In traditional rotary kilns, pulverized coal is generally fed into the kiln and ignited by a burner, so that the mixed coal materials are burned and heated to the required temperature. Traditional rotary kilns can also use fuel gas, heavy oil, and other fuels as heat sources. But its shortcoming is also obvious, that is, it cannot handle flammable and explosive materials that cannot be heated by an open flame.

Indirect combustion has received widespread attention in recent years. Indirect rotary kiln has become a more common commercial option in the past 25 years. Indirect rotary kiln differs from direct combustion in that all heat transferred to the processing material is radiated through the casing meanwhile the construction material can withstand higher temperatures.

The indirect rotary kiln is horizontal. You can preheat the surface of the rotary kiln by burning natural gas or fuel. Heat is transferred to many burners outside the barrel to avoid local overheating of the enclosure. The indirect heating rotary kiln is mainly used to process flammable, explosive or chemically active substances, and it is not recommended to be applied to the production line of quicklime or cement.

Indirect-fired rotary kiln treatment of waste is a popular method of treating waste in recent years, but it is still rarely used in China. In fact, the use of indirect rotary kiln incineration to treat waste has been successfully practiced in worldwide, showing great advantages in economics, prevention of secondary pollution, and thoroughness of waste innocuous treatment. Indirect-fired rotary kiln has so many advantages.

indirect fired rotary kiln applications part 1

indirect fired rotary kiln applications part 1

In the thermal processing industry, rotary kilns are used to cause chemical reactions or state changes in varying materials. As discussed previously in Direct Fired Rotary Kilns vs. Indirect Fired Rotary Kilns: Whats the Difference, while direct fired rotary kilns and indirect fired rotary kilns use similar thermal processing principles, they are each beneficial in different applications. In this three part mini-series, we will look at some of the situations in which an indirect fired rotary kiln is a more efficient choice.

There is an array of applications in which a hazardous component may be absorbed on an inert solid substrate. An example of this is spent activated carbons, used to absorb an undesirable waste component from a liquid or gaseous stream. In such cases, the spent, or used up carbon can be activated for reuse through means of an indirect fired rotary kiln. The used up carbon can be held at high temperatures and the absorbed component will volatilize and effectively be desorbed from the carbon, making the carbon again ready to absorb a hazardous component.

Following desorption, the volatilized waste is then evacuated from the system via an imposed draft. This off-gas from the indirect fired rotary kiln would be laden with a hazardous waste component that could then be either condensed in high purity, or incinerated as a concentrated vapor stream. This operation of reactivating a solid substrate could be performed in a direct fired rotary kiln, but the off-gas burden would be significantly increased. Depending on the regulations placed on the volatilized compounds, the treatment of this off-gas could be quite costly.

Conversely, the goal of some processes is to recover a high value volatile component from a somewhat valueless solid carrier. As an example, consider the thermal separation of oil from oil shale. Such an application is likely best suited in an indirect fired rotary kiln. As in the case of combustible materials, a direct fired rotary kiln can be carefully designed to perform the separation, but the load on separation equipment, such as a condenser, becomes greatly increased by undesired tramp air. The cost associated with these ancillary separation devices can far exceed the cost of the heat transfer vessel. By processing such a material in an indirect fired rotary kiln, the desired volatile product is highly concentrated and does not burden the recovery equipment with needless tramp air.

Another highly promising application is in using an indirect fired rotary kiln to effectively distill valuable oils from low value wastes such as scrap tires, oil saturated soils, and oil drilling wastes (cuttings).

Other typical indirect fired rotary kiln applications include chemical laden soils, absorbents, tank wastes, and other inert substrates. As these examples indicate, there are countless applications wherein an indirect fired rotary kiln may result in a more cost effective system overall. The developer of a thermal process must take into account the cost of all required ancillaries, operating cost, product quality requirements, and several other variables as opposed to merely the cost of the primary heat transfer device. When evaluating an overall system approach, the designer must also take into account operating cost factors such as the cost of fuel, cooling water, power, instrument air, the air quality restrictions, and the cost of off-spec product.

cement rotary kiln - rotary kiln - rotary kiln manufacturers | agico

cement rotary kiln - rotary kiln - rotary kiln manufacturers | agico

Cement rotary kilns refer to cement rotary calcining kilns (sometimes called rotary furnaces). It is a pyroprocessing device used to heat materials to high temperatures in a continuous process. The kiln body is a cylinder vessel with a certain degree of tilt to the horizontal level. Raw materials are fed into the vessel from the upper end and moved to the lower end, being stirred and mixed relying on the inclination and rotation of the kiln. The kiln burner produces a lot of heat by burning fuel. This kind of heat is usually transferred to materials through flame radiation, hot gas convection, kiln brick conduction, etc., which causes the chemical reaction between raw materials and finally forms clinker.

Rotary kilns can be divided into cement kiln, metallurgical and chemical rotary kiln, lime rotary kiln and so on. Cement rotary kilns are used for calcining cement clinker in the cement plant, which can be divided into dry cement kiln and wet cement kiln. Metallurgical and chemical rotary kilns are mainly applied in the metallurgical industry. As for the lime rotary kiln, it is the main equipment for calcining active lime and light burned dolomite used in iron and steel plants, ferroalloy plants, calcium carbide plants, and magnesium metal plants.

The cement rotary kiln is mainly composed of cylinder, supporting device, drive gear, refractory lining, catch-wheel device, kiln head sealing device, kiln tail sealing device, kiln hood, and other components. On the cylinder, there is a large gear ring fixed with a spring plate near the kiln tail, some pinions below are engaged with it, jointly forming the drive gear. In normal operation, the main drive motor will transfer power to this gear device through reducer to run rotary kiln. The raw material usually enters the rotary kiln from the upper end and move slowly to another end along with the chamber as it rotates. In this process, raw materials will be heated by high temperature and then decompose and produce chemical reactions so that their state finally changed. Under normal conditions, the heat source of indirect fired rotary kilns is supplied from the kiln burner outside the kiln. This kind of way protects the integrity of raw materials, while the heat source of the direct-fired rotary kiln is inside the kiln. Besides, the rotation speed and temperature of the cylinder are tightly controlled and changed according to different desire processes and material applications. After the calcination is completed, the clinker will be pre-cooled in the chamber and then be sent into the cooler for further cooling.

AGICO Group is an integrative enterprise group. It is a Chinese company that specialized in manufacturing and exporting cement plants and cement equipment, providing the turnkey project from project design, equipment installation and equipment commissioning to equipment maintenance.

a beginners guide to pyro-processing

a beginners guide to pyro-processing

For over a century, rotary equipment has been widely accepted as a preferred means for the pyro-processing of bulk solids, offering distinct advantages over stationary processing equipment. As a cylinder rotates, tumbling, sliding, lifting or showering continuously agitates the material within. These actions ensure that the material being processed is uniformly exposed to the heat source, ultimately leading to higher efficiencies and reduced processing times relative to a stationary process.

While there is some overlap between rotary dryers and kilns, they are generally used to carry out distinctly different goals. The rotary dryer is a heat transfer device most commonly used for low temperature applications where the goal is to reduce the moisture content of the material. Conversely, rotary kilns are used for what are considered high temperature processing applications, where the goal is to cause a physical change or chemical reaction in the material.

Both direct rotary dryers and rotary kilns rely on direct contact between the material and process gas in order to process materials. Because rotary dryers operate at low temperatures, it is not necessary to internally line the dryer shell, and as a result, a wide range of internals can be installed to improve heat transfer. The most common form of internals is a lifting flight or lifter, which is typically plate steel extending perpendicularly inward toward the cylinder center line.

These lifters act to pick up material from the bed that forms as an arc on the upward running face of the cylinders inside surface. The cross sectional area of this material bed is typically about 10% of the overall cross sectional area. The direct-fired rotary dryer internals effectively act to remove material from this quasi- static bed of tumbling solids and lift it along the shells inside periphery and then shower or disperse a curtain of material as the internals approach the highest portion of rotation. The density of the showering curtain is of key consideration to the rotary dryer designer and operator. The efficiency and effectiveness of this equipment is determined in part by how much intimate contact exists between the solids and the hot gases flowing within the vessel. Please refer to Figure 1 below, which characterizes solids flow in a direct-fired rotary dryer.

The rotary kiln is most typically a carbon steel cylinder lined internally with refractory. In a direct-fired kiln, the hot gases of combustion are in contact only with the refractory lining and product, thereby protecting the steel structure of the vessel from high temperature stresses. The result of this design is that products can be elevated to up to about 3000F without causing damage to the rotating vessel.

The operation of the higher temperature, refractory lined rotary kiln is very similar to that of the rotary dryer. The principal distinction is that a rotary kilns operation is not defined by showering material in the hot gas stream, rather, the arc of material that forms may intentionally remain intact and is not dispersed. Heat transfer to the solids is not typically dominated by convection. Hot gases continuously heat the internal refractory lining of the kiln shell and as the cylinder rotates, the tumbling bed of solids is constantly exposed to the hot refractory surface. Since the solids are in intimate contact with a hotter surface, heat transfer is by conduction.

Radiation effects also occur, especially if the refractory is glowing at elevated temperatures above 1200F. The surfaces of the solids bed (toward the kiln center line) also experience heat transfer by radiation since material is in view of the hot-glowing refractory.

As one might expect, the direct-fired rotary dryer acting as a dispersion device can achieve higher heat transfer rates than refractory lined kilns. The result is that the rotary dryer can transfer more heat per unit volume than a rotary kiln.

Although indirect-fired rotary kilns and dryers closely parallel the direct-fired rotary devices in operation, the indirectly fired kiln or dryer is distinct from its direct-fired counterpart, due to the fact that all heat transferred to the processed material is conducted (and/or radiated) through the vessel shell wall.

In an indirect device, there is not an internal gas flow acting as a heat source, so components such as lifting flights would offer no perceivable advantage. Heat is transferred to the bed of solids by conduction between the solids and the conduction between the solids and the hot, internal wall of the kiln. In most applications, the shell is heated to temperatures at or above 1200F, so radiation between shell and solids also prevails. Since products of combustion are completely isolated from the product being processed, two heat transfer mechanisms take place.

Heat is transferred to the rotating shells outer surface by an isolated heat source, most commonly; gas or oil fired burners orientated so as to bathe the shell surface in hot products of combustion. Depending on size and geometry of a particular unit, a number of burners forming an array may be employed to avoid localized overheating of the shell through excessive localized heat release. Other heat sources may be employed such as electric resistance heating elements or hot waste gas or thermal transfer fluid from isolated sources. In the event that gas or oil fired burners are used, the products of combustion are emitted through a stack as clean flue gas.

In an indirect-fired rotary kiln, the shell temperature tends to be uniform along the circumference regardless of the heat source being from a distinct point. This is no doubt due to the excellent conductivity of the alloys of construction.

The second heat transfer mode is that of transferring heat from the internal shell surface to the colder bed of solids. The heat transfer process is best modeled as a heat flux passing through a boundary layer (the shell).

In the case of gas burners being the heat source, the washing of the shell is dominant since it employs radiative and convective modes. The heat transfer from the shell interior surface to solids being processed is, therefore, the controlling condition.

This simple heat transfer equation is fairly accurate in modeling an indirect rotary kiln or dryer, either as a whole system or a specific region. The most accurate way to characterize a system is by finite element analyses in which discrete portions of a unit are analyzed. Such thorough investigations are seldom warranted, but the overall process is best viewed as being comprised of several distinct phases occurring at separate temperatures. As an example, consider a feed material that contains moisture, a volatile organic compound, and perhaps an endothermic reaction at elevated temperature. In such a system, six individual steps occur which comprise the overall unit operation:

It becomes critical to view such an overall process as distinct steps since each occurs at a fixed temperature range. As one might realize, such fixed temperatures allow the system designer to more accurately determine the log mean temperature difference, which is a governing variable in the overall design equation.

Virtually any process that can be carried out in a directly fired rotary kiln or dryer can also be carried out in an indirectly heated unit. Both types of systems have inherent advantages and disadvantages attributed to their operation. As a general rule, direct-fired devices are more efficient in operation and also have a lower capital cost than their indirect counterparts. For this reason, direct-fired units are significantly more common than indirect-fired units. There are numerous applications however, in which an indirect unit offers better overall economics.

While the indirect process was conceived of and used over 100 years ago, only in the last 25 years have indirect rotary vessels become a widespread commercial reality. This is due primarily to advances in materials of construction capable of withstanding higher temperatures. As a result, indirectly heated dryers and kilns continue to gain attention for both improving existing processes as well as developing new ones.

Throughout many industries, indirect-fired units are employed in process settings that call for more specialized processing needs. Common settings where indirect units provide a better processing medium are listed here.

Indirect-fired rotary kilns can be beneficial when the material to be processed consists of finely divided solids. In a direct-fired rotary kiln, the heat source is hot gas (products of combustion and air) which flows with an inherent velocity. These gases can carry discrete particles through from drag. The degree of entrainment depends on a variety of factors such as gas velocity, gas density, particle density, and shape. Due to entrainment potential, direct-fired rotary kilns processing fine materials require the design to be centered around permissible gas velocities as opposed to heat transfer requirements.

Indirect-fired rotary kilns do not rely on processed materials being in intimate contact with hot combustion gases. It is common for direct-fired rotary kilns to have upward of 100 times the mass or volume of process gas flowing within the vessel as opposed to an indirect unit of the same duty.

Another setting in which an indirectly heated unit will outperform a direct one is when processing must occur in an inert environment. As an example, most carbonaceous solids will combust at elevated temperatures in the presence of free oxygen. High temperature processing of combustible products such as coal, petroleum coke, sludge, and numerous organic solids can be carried out in direct-fired rotary equipment, but careful provisions must be made to ensure safety. Fuel rich or near precise stoichiometric flames must be developed to reduce the presence of free oxygen. Such systems are complicated in their control and may involve oxygen detection, explosion relief doors, and automated extinguishing systems. Such extensive provisions involve added costs and careful licensing and insurance detail.

Other applications exist in which oxidation of product does not pose an explosion or combustion risk, but the quality of the product may be deleteriously affected by oxidation. Applications where an undesirable oxide compound forms in the presence of oxygen at high temperatures are often best performed by indirectly heated means. A common example would be a metallic product.

Other isolated cases may exist where a solid may form an undesirable compound with nitrogen at high temperatures. In such a case, it is nearly impossible to eliminate nitrogen composition from processed solids in a direct-fired rotary kiln, but relatively easy in an indirect-fired rotary kiln.

Indirect-fired units are also used to perform an array of gas to solids reactions. The indirect unit can prove ideal to expose solids to a gaseous chemical reactant under high temperatures where reactions occur at accelerated rates. The doping of ceramic catalysts could serve as a practical example.

Such chemical reactants can be introduced into a direct-fired unit, but the reactant becomes diluted by the hot gases, which are required, as a heat transfer medium. In indirect units, any reactant utilized can be piped in and metered to achieve precise concentrations.

The goal of some processes is to recover a high value volatile component from a somewhat valueless solid carrier. As an example, consider the thermal separation of oil from oil shale. Such an application is likely best suited in an indirect-fired unit.

As in the case of combustible materials, a direct-fired vessel could be carefully designed to perform the separation, but the load on separation equipment, such as a condenser, becomes greatly increased by undesired tramp air. The cost associated with these ancillary separation devices can far exceed the cost of the heat transfer vessel itself. By processing such a material in an indirect-fired unit, the desired volatile product is highly concentrated and does not burden the recovery equipment with needless tramp air.

Another highly promising application is in using an indirect-fired rotary kiln to effectively distill valuable oils from low value wastes such as scrap tires, oil saturated soils, and oil drilling wastes (cuttings).

There is an array of applications in which a hazardous component may be adsorbed on an inert solid substrate. An example of this is spent activated carbons, used to adsorb an undesirable waste component from a liquid or gaseous stream. In such cases, the spent, or used up carbon can be activated for reuse through means of an indirect-fired rotary kiln. The used up carbon can be held at high temperatures and the adsorbed component will volatilize and effectively be desorbed from the carbon, making the carbon again ready to absorb a hazardous component.

Following desorption, the volatilized waste is evacuated from the system via an imposed draft. This off-gas from the indirect-fired rotary kiln would be laden with a hazardous waste component that could then be either condensed in high purity, or incinerated as a concentrated vapor stream. This operation of reactivating a solid substrate could be performed in a direct-fired rotary kiln, but the off-gas burden would be significantly increased. Depending on the regulations placed on the volatilized compounds, the treatment of this off-gas could be quite costly.

All of the previous applications for indirect-fired rotary kilns are just some of the many instances in which an indirect rotary kiln can be advantageous. As these examples indicate, there are countless applications wherein an indirect-fired rotary kiln may result in a more cost effective system overall. The developer of a pyro-processing application must take into account the cost of all required ancillaries, operating costs, product quality requirements, and several other variables as opposed to merely the cost of the primary heat transfer device. When evaluating an overall system approach, the designer must also take into account operating cost factors such as the cost of fuel, cooling water, power, instrument air, the air quality restrictions, and the cost of off-spec product.

Recent developments have been made to develop equipment flowsheets that combine direct and indirect processing steps. Some hybrid equipment has been developed with direct and indirect phases occurring in a single vessel. As an example of this, consider the ducting of clean flue gas from the furnace segment of an indirect unit to a direct rotary dryer. This scenario can be achieved in a single vessel. Please refer to Figure 3 below.

Rotary kilns and dryers have become the foundation of many of todays industrial processes, offering distinct advantages over stationary equipment. And while direct-fired units have been the predominant configuration, recent advancements in heat-resistant alloys have opened the door to more specialized processing applications using indirect-fired vessels.

FEECO has been providing custom rotary dryers and kilns since 1951. Were familiar with hundreds of materials and can help to develop a process and commercial-scale unit around your unique material and processing goals. For more information, contact us today!

indirectly heated rotary kiln for efficient thermal processing

indirectly heated rotary kiln for efficient thermal processing

With a strong demand for the mining industry to adopt a more sustainable method of producing high-quality products, the machinery used must be designed to accommodate this need, while still maintaining a high level of efficiency and productivity. However, if designed poorly, maintenance issues and higher operational costs can make this sustainable approach not worthwhile.

This is why, at FLSmidth, we have designed and engineered an Indirect Rotary Kiln that aims to provide a solution to these problems. Rather than applying heat directly to the material as direct rotary kilns do the Indirect Rotary Kiln is heated from the outside, where the material is heated via contact with the outer kiln shell. This allows for a more tightly controlled environment, which is especially effective when used primarily in the lithium from spodumene industry. The kiln is also suitable for use with any minerals bearing ore from which the action of mineral acids extracts metals.

For this reason, we have manufactured our indirect rotary kilns to be highly robust, ensuring minimal maintenance and a longer service life. With our kiln, you also benefit from reduced fuel consumption and waste gas emissions, which is both cost-effective and sustainable.

FLSmidth provides sustainable productivity to the global mining and cement industries. We deliver market-leading engineering, equipment and service solutions that enable our customers to improve performance, drive down costs and reduce environmental impact. Our operations span the globe and we are close to 10,200 employees, present in more than 60 countries. In 2020, FLSmidth generated revenue of DKK 16.4 billion. MissionZero is our sustainability ambition towards zero emissions in mining and cement by 2030.

rotary kilns

rotary kilns

FEECO is a leading manufacturer of highly engineered, custom rotary kilns for processing solids. Our high temperature kilns have earned a reputation for their durability, efficiency, and longevity. We offer both direct- and indirect-fired units.

Rotary kilns work by processing material in a rotating drum at high temperatures for a specified retention time to cause a physical change or chemical reaction in the material being processed. The kiln is set at a slight slope to assist in moving material through the drum.

Direct-fired kilns utilize direct contact between the material and process gas to efficiently process the material. Combustion can occur in a combustion chamber to avoid direct flame radiation, or the flame can be directed down the length of the kiln.

All FEECO equipment and process systems can be outfitted with the latest in automation controls from Rockwell Automation. The unique combination of proprietary Rockwell Automation controls and software, combined with our extensive experience in process design and enhancements with hundreds of materials provides an unparalleled experience for customers seeking innovative process solutions and equipment.

Indirect-fired kilns are used for various processing applications, such as when processing must occur in an inert environment, when working with finely divided solids, or when the processing environment must be tightly controlled.

Calcination refers to the process of heating a material to a temperature that will cause chemical dissociation (chemical separation). This process is used frequently in the creation of inorganic materials, for example, the dissociation of calcium carbonate to create calcium oxide and carbon dioxide.

Thermal desorption is also a separation process. This process uses heat to drive off a volatile component, such as a pesticide, from an inorganic mineral, such as sand. The component is vaporized at the increased temperature, causing a separation without combustion. In some cases, an indirect rotary kiln would be best for this application, because the volatile chemicals may be combustible. The indirect kiln will supply the heat for desorption, without the material coming into direct contact with the flame.

Organic combustion refers to the treatment of organic wastes with the intent of reducing mass and volume. Organic waste is treated in the kiln, leaving behind an ash with considerably less mass and volume. This allows for more efficient and effective deposit of waste materials into landfills.

Sintering is the process of heating a raw material to the point just before melting. This increases the strength of the material, and is commonly used in the proppant industry, where sand or ceramic materials are made stronger.

Heat setting involves bonding a heat resistant core mineral with another, less heat resistant coating material. Unlike an unheated coating process, here, a rotary kiln heats the coating material to just below liquefaction point, allowing it to coat the heat resistant core more evenly and more securely. This process is commonly seen in the manufacture of roofing granules, where a mineral such as granite is coated with a colored pigment, producing a product that is both durable and aesthetically pleasing.

Reduction roasting is the removal of oxygen from a component of an ore usually by using carbon monoxide (CO). The CO is typically supplied by mixing a carbonaceous material such as coal or coke with the ore or by feeding it separately. Examples are the reduction roasting of a hematite containing material to produce magnetite that can be magnetically separated. In the Waelz process, zinc oxide in steel mill wastes is reduced to metallic zinc and volatilized for recovery in the off-gas system.

Thermal Desorption for Spent CatalystsRotary Kiln3D Indirect Kiln for Activated CarbonPyrolysis Kiln Seal3D FEECO Pyrolysis KilnPyrolysis KilnWorn Rotary Kiln RefractoryBatch Rotary Kiln TestingKiln Alignment SoftwareProcessing Challenges When Working with Rotary KilnsFEECO Batch Kiln BrochureIndustry Focus COVID-19 Demands Medical Waste Incineration CapacityIndirect Fired Rotary Kiln ReplacementRotary Kiln IncineratorsResource of the Week: Thermal Testing with Kilns3D Model of a FEECO Carbon Activation KilnRotary Kiln Testing ThumbnailRotary Kiln TestingIndirect Batch Rotary Kiln Testing, Batch Calciner Testing, Thermal Process DevelopmentKnowing When its Time to Replace Your Rotary Drum Seal, Leaf SealRotary Drum Drive ComponentsRotary Drum BreechingReplacement Rotary Drum BearingsBoomin Catalyst Market Drives Demand for Rotary Kiln Repair Services, Rotary KilnsReplacement Dryer (Drier) and Kiln BurnersCombustion ChambersReplacement Rotary Drum ShellRotary Drum Laser Alignment Process, Rotary Drum AlignmentWhy Post Maintenance Alignment is Critical to Rotary DrumsCauses of Tire (Tyre) and Trunnion Wear, Rotary Drum TireFEECO Tire (Tyre) Grinding Machine, Tire and Trunnion Grinding in ProgressRotary Drum Tire (Tyre) Wear Pattern from Excessive Wheel Skewing, Rotary Drum Tire in Need of Tire GrindingRotary Drum Tire (Tyre) Wear Pattern from Poor Housekeeping Practices, Rotary Drum Tire in Need of Tire GrindingRotary Drum Tire (Tyre) Wear Pattern from Misalignment, Rotary Drum Tire in Need of Tire GrindingRotary Drum Tire (Tyre) Wear Pattern from Using Improper Tire Lubricant, Rotary Drum Tire in Need of Tire GrindingTire (Tyre) and Trunnion Wheel GrindingTire (Tyre) and Trunnion GrindingIndirect Rotary Kiln (Calciner) for Plastics PyrolysisPlastic to Fuel Conversion via Pyrolysis Replacement Rotary Drum PartsRotary Drum Thrust RollersRotary Drum Trunnion Wheels (Rollers)Rotary Drum Riding Ring (Tire/Tyre)Resource of the Week: Girth Gears PageRotary Kiln System Optimization, Rotary Kiln Process AuditSpring-Mounted Replacement Rotary Drum Girth GearRotary Kiln Gains Traction as E-Waste Crisis Looms, Metal Recovery from E-WasteIndirect Batch Rotary Kiln Testing, Batch Calciner Testing, Thermal Process Development, Metal RecoveryDirect-Fired Rotary KilnRotary Kiln Chain and Sprocket Drive AssemblyRotary Kiln Gear and Pinion Drive AssemblyRotary Kiln Friction Drive AssemblyRotary Kiln Direct Drive AssemblyRotary Kiln Trunnion BaseRotary kiln end dam for increasing loading, retention time, and bed depthResource of the Week: Rotary Kiln Customization Slideshare PresentationKaolin Clay CalcinationLithium-ion Battery Recycling OpportunitiesRotary Kilns in Expanded Clay Aggregate ProductionBatch Kiln for Testing Expanded Clay AggregatesRotary Kiln Refractory Failure Illustration, Rotary Kiln Shell Hot SpotRotary Kiln Refractory InspectionDirect-Fired Rotary Kiln for SpodumeneCalciner (Indirect Kiln) for Lithium Recovery from SpodumeneRotary Kiln Complete SystemFEECO Batch Kiln for Testing CalcinationRotary Drum Drive BaseRotary Kilns for Advanced Thermal Processing in SustainabilityResource of the Week: Project Profile on a Rotary Kiln (Calciner) Resource Recovery SystemResource of the Week: Tire Grinding BrochureResource of the Week: Slideshare Presentation on Rotary Kiln Sizing and DesignResource of the Week: Unitized Drive Base BrochureDiagram Showing a Rotary Kiln with Co-current AirflowDiagram Showing a Rotary Kiln with Counter Current AirflowDiagram Showing Co-current Airflow View All >

The advantages to a FEECO rotary kiln are that it is built to the highest quality standards and is backed by over 60 years of process design experience. The FEECO Innovation Center offers batch and pilot scale kilns that can simulate conditions in continuous commercial rotary kilns, allowing our customers to test small samples of material under various process conditions, as well as part of a continuous process. With options in both co-current and counter-current flow, and direct or indirect configurations, the FEECO test kilns offer a variety of options to suit your thermal testing needs. We also offer support equipment such as a combustion chamber, afterburner, baghouse, and wet scrubber for testing.

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