how to calculate cement, sand and coarse aggregate quantity in concrete? - calculator

how to calculate cement, sand and coarse aggregate quantity in concrete? - calculator

Please note that the information in Civilology is designed to provide general information on the topics presented. The information provided should not be used as a substitute for professional services.

how to calculate cement, sand and coarse aggregate for concrete?

how to calculate cement, sand and coarse aggregate for concrete?

If we need to add 1m3sand in the concrete mix ratio, we take 1.3 m3 (30% more). The reason for that is the moisture content present in the sand makes it a little bulkier. The 5% to 8% of surface moisture will increase the bulking of sand up to 20% to 30%. When we add more water (more than 8%) to the sand, the thin film will disappear, and volume decreases.

Void Ratio If you fill the shuttering area with blue metal alone it has lots of voids in it which also need to be filled by the other materials such as sand & cement. Such void gap is known as void ratio compressibility which is 20% for coarse aggregate.

how to calculate quantities of cement, sand and aggregate for nominal concrete mix (1:2:4)? - happho

how to calculate quantities of cement, sand and aggregate for nominal concrete mix (1:2:4)? - happho

While following a mix design is advised to optimise the material consumption, it is not possible at site to always come up with Mix design. Nominal mix concrete is prepared by approximate proportioning of cement, sand and aggregate to obtain target compressive strength.

Eyeopener :Many popular blogs claim M20 nominal mix as 1:1.5:3 ,however we strongly differ by same.Through this blog,we are also trying to address the same myth which is being carried forward since last 4 decades.

The reason being: With constant research and development in the field of cement technology and its manufacturing process ,a M20 mix of 1:1.5:3(by volume) would be too rich, over engineered and uneconomical (~7.5 bags of cement per cum) and will ultimately result into a M30 concrete and above (IS:456 too have the minimum cement/cementitious content of 06 bags for M20). As the latest generation of 53 grade OPC cement is ultimately giving a strength of 65 to 70 MPa at 28days, 1:2:4 will give a strength of M20.

The DLBD (Dry Loose Bulk Densities) method is anaccurate method to calculate cement, sand and aggregatefor a given nominal mix concrete. This gives accurate results as it takes into account the Dry Loose Bulk Densities of materials like Sand and Aggregate which varies based on the local source of the material

To convert Sand volume into weight we assume, we need the dry loose bulk density (DLBD). This density for practical purposes has to be determined at site for arriving at the exact quantities. We can also assume the following dry loose bulk densities for calculation.

Although empirical method is easy to use in determining the materials requirement for Nominal Concrete mix, it sometimes doesnt give accurate results as it doesnt take into factor the local variations in the materials.

With constant research and development in the field of cement technology and its manufacturing process ,a M20 mix of 1:1.5:3(by volume) would be too rich,over engineered and uneconomical (~7.5 bags of cement per cum) and will ultimately result into a M30 concrete and above, the reason being latest generation of 53 grade OPC cement is ultimately giving a strength of 65 to 70 MPa at 28days.

in my country one bag of cement is 50kg or 0.035cum and for measuring aggregates and sand we use head pans(0.0175cum). for 1cum of concrete the expected materials are cement 6.5bags sand; 0.44cum(26headpans) aggregate;0 0.88(51headpahs).but on site we have to use more material to achieve the expected volume instead of the estimated calculations we arrive here. can i have answers?

In the step 3 of How To Calculate Quantities Of Cement, Sand And Aggregate For Nominal Concrete Mix (1:2:4) you have calculated that: 01 cum of concrete will require Cement required = 1/0.167 = 5.98 Bags ~ 6 Bags Sand required = 115/0.167 = 688 Kgs or 14.98 cft Aggregate required = 209/0.167 = 1251 kgs or 29.96 cft Could you please clear How you have converted The Kgs (Kgs/m3) for Sand & Aggregate in to cft. Thanks & Regds

Thanks a lot for the response, In your claculations in step-3, I tried to put Units to indentify my confusion as mentioned below. One bag of cement and other ingredients can produce = 400/2400 = 0.167 Cum of concrete (1:2:4) 01 bag cement yield = 0.167 cum concrete with a proportion of 1:2:4 01 cum of concrete will require Cement required = 1(m3/bag)/0.167 (m3) = 5.98 Bags ~ 6 Bags OK Sand required = 115(Kgs)/0.167(m3) = 688 (Kgs/m3) or 14.98 cft Aggregate required = 209(Kgs)/0.167(m3) = 1251 (kgs/m3) or 29.96 cft As the units of Sand & Aggregate seem to be in Kgs/m3, therefore multiplication with Bulk Density (Kgs/m3), the result will be unit less. Hence conversion in to cft would not be possible. Please comment Thanks & Regds

We are constructing First floor on existing house having Six Inches RCC slab. We are intended to used marble on the floor. Could you please advise us that what should be: 1- Thickness of cemented part of the floor. 2- Ratio of the concrete. I am sure you will help us in this regard. Thanks & Regds

If the ratio of cement, sand and crushed stone for making the concrete needed for a sidewalk is 2:3:4, how many cubic meters of cement is needed to make 4 cubic.meters of concrete. Please help me to solve this.

We have Portland cement in Nigeria the highest which is grade 42.5 ordinary Portland cement is not available in bags. Kindly give the mix calculations for cement grade 42.5 Portland cement for grade 20 and 25 concrete

We have given the materials requirement for M15, M20, M25 and M30 Grade Concretes in the blog. Please refer. If you want 10 mm and 20 mm aggregate mixed in the concrete, mix it in the ratio of 50:50 (of coarse aggregate volume). PCC should be usually be done with M15, so we havent given the ratio for M10.

Estimate the amount of materials and number of batches (maximum 50kg mixing per batch) for: 1.12 cylinders + 12 cubes (6x6x6) 2.Density can be assumed kg/m^3 3.5% wastage 4.Strength fc = 25Mpa 5.Agg. Size = 10mm 6.OPC 7.Slump 40mm 8.Non Air Entrained 9.Fineness Modulus (Fine) = 2.4 10.RoddedDensity (Coarse) = kg/m3 11.Sp. Gravity of Cement = 3.2 12.Sp. Gravity of Fine = 2.3 13.Sp. Gravity of Coarse = 5.3 14.Water Absorption (Fine) = 5.2% 15.Water Absorption (Coarse) = 0.3% Data is according to ACI comittee report 2011 My question is what are the proportions of Cement:Sand:Crush

Concrete for specific needs has to be properly designed to identify the ratio of cement, sand and aggregate. The mix proportions shown in the table are for general purpose use like concreting for houses, small scale concrete jobs etc., Request you to get a proper mix design based on max aggregate size, strength, durability and workability..

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What is the approximate compressive strength of mix 1:2.5:3 using dalmia dsp (calling as 53 grade cement) and mix 1:2:2.5 using JSW OPC 53 grade. Water cement ratio may be .55-.65. For jsw opc, admixture dr.fixit 100 lw+. All mix in volume Batch.

What is the approximate compressive strength of mix 1:2.5:3 using dalmia DSP (call as 53 grade cement) & another mix 1:2:2.5 using JSW OPC 53 grade. Water cement ratio may be .55-.65. For jsw opc, admixture Dr.fixit 100 lw+. All mix in volume Batch?

cement - mortar and concrete - mixes etc

cement - mortar and concrete - mixes etc

Below are details of concrete and mortar for different applications, how to estimate quantities and what these quantities mean. The various mixes are quoted as volume ratios, however the individual components are normally sold by weight, so a little calculation work is required.

Cement in concrete and mortar creates its strength by chemical reaction, it is not like wallpaper glue which 'drys out', it 'goes off'. In fact, if the concrete or mortar should 'dry out' before the chemical reaction is substantially complete, it will fail. Likewise if it is subjected to a frost, it can also fail.

Concrete/mortar will take months to reach it's full strength however after about 24 hours it should be fairly hard and after 4 or 5 days, the strength should be enough to stand up to normal punishment.

Cement: For normal 'around the house' types jobs, Ordinary (or Portland) cement is required. This is normally available in 50kg bags, although smaller 25kg bags are increasingly becoming available to take account of the UK manual handling regulations. Try not to buy more cement than you need as it cannot be stored for very long. Some special cements are available (i.e. quick drying) which may be required for special situation.

Lime: Lime is sometimes used in cement and reduces the amount of water drawn into the bricks, thus preventing the cement from drying out too quick and shrinking. The main types of lime are: hydraulic - which sets by combining with water. Non-hydraulic - this hardens by drying out. Semi-hydraulic - which is a half-and-half, it mainly needs to dry out but has some hydraulic properties. Each type is available as either hydrated lime and quicklime - hydrated is more convenient to use as it has been processed ready for use. Hydrated hydraulic lime must be used straight from the bag. Hydrated semi- or non-hydraulic are better to use after soaking in water for 24 hours - stir it into water and leave it overnight - the lime sinks to the bottom and excess water can then be poured off. Mix the lime with the sand before adding the cement. Sand: Two types of sand are available but are not interchangeable in all applications, whichever type is being used, always pass it though a sieve before use to remove any small stones etc. Soft sand (or Builders sand): a smooth sand, non-gritty, loamy and with cohesive properties, can be used for: Bricklaying mortar For bedding paving slabs For rendering walls Sharp sand: this has a gritty feel and is similar to that used to condition soils and potting composts, can be used for: Concrete For rendering floors and walls Gravel: consists of various sized small stones and is mixed with sharp sand for concrete (instead of using aggregate/ballest). Gravel is normally graded by size of the largest stones; 10mm gravel will have been sieved though a 10mm mesh to remove all larger stones. Aggregate (also referred to as ballast): is used for concrete and consists of various sized particles from fine grains of sand to small stones(gravel). Aggregate is normally graded by size of the largest stones; 10mm Aggregate will have been sieved though a 10mm mesh to remove all larger stones. Mixes: (see separate page for render/stucco mixes) Mortar sand : cement sand : lime : cement general building (above ground) 5:1 5:1:1 general building (below ground) 3:1 6:1:1 Internal walls 8:1 9:2:1 Concrete Ballast : cement Sharp sand : cement Foundations, drives, floor slab, other heavy duty 5 : 1 (20mm Ballast) Foot paths and thin sections 3.25 : 1 (10mm Ballast) Paving less than 50mm (2 inch), bedding for slabs 3 : 1 Volume/weight conversion Cement 1 cubic yard = 21.6cwt 1 cubic metre = 1.4 tonne Lime 1 cubic yard = 10.8cwt 1 cubic metre = 0.7 tonne Sand 1 cubic yard = 25 cwt 1 cubic metre = 1.7 tonne Gravel 1 cubic yard = 23.5 cwt 1 cubic metre = 1.6 tonne Aggregate(ballast) The weight of Aggregate depends upon the proportion of solid stone and can vary between 1.3 and 1.8 tonne per cubic metre (20 to 27 cwt per cubic yard). For practical purposes, the sand volume/weight conversions can be used. Storage Cement and lime - keep undercover and dry. Cement will tend to absorb water and turn hard if left for any long periods in high humidity. Sand, Gravel and Ballast - small quanties can be stored in heavy duty plastic bags. Larger quantities should, ideally, be stored on a solid base. If it has to be stored on earth, place a lining of some sort on the earth before the sand/ballast is deposited - this will prevent it being absorbed into the earth and the earth into it. Try to keep the pile covered when not being used, this will ensure that local pets will not contaminate the top side as well as preventing any rain from washing some of it away - but do not let the pile get too dry as this may cause problems when it comes time to use it. cement - lime - sand - gravel - aggregate. ballest - mortar - concrete

Each type is available as either hydrated lime and quicklime - hydrated is more convenient to use as it has been processed ready for use. Hydrated hydraulic lime must be used straight from the bag. Hydrated semi- or non-hydraulic are better to use after soaking in water for 24 hours - stir it into water and leave it overnight - the lime sinks to the bottom and excess water can then be poured off. Mix the lime with the sand before adding the cement.

Gravel: consists of various sized small stones and is mixed with sharp sand for concrete (instead of using aggregate/ballest). Gravel is normally graded by size of the largest stones; 10mm gravel will have been sieved though a 10mm mesh to remove all larger stones.

Aggregate (also referred to as ballast): is used for concrete and consists of various sized particles from fine grains of sand to small stones(gravel). Aggregate is normally graded by size of the largest stones; 10mm Aggregate will have been sieved though a 10mm mesh to remove all larger stones.

The weight of Aggregate depends upon the proportion of solid stone and can vary between 1.3 and 1.8 tonne per cubic metre (20 to 27 cwt per cubic yard). For practical purposes, the sand volume/weight conversions can be used.

Sand, Gravel and Ballast - small quanties can be stored in heavy duty plastic bags. Larger quantities should, ideally, be stored on a solid base. If it has to be stored on earth, place a lining of some sort on the earth before the sand/ballast is deposited - this will prevent it being absorbed into the earth and the earth into it. Try to keep the pile covered when not being used, this will ensure that local pets will not contaminate the top side as well as preventing any rain from washing some of it away - but do not let the pile get too dry as this may cause problems when it comes time to use it.

calculate cement sand & aggregate - m20, m15, m10, m5 ratio | civil rnd

calculate cement sand & aggregate - m20, m15, m10, m5 ratio | civil rnd

Proper calculation and relative proportioning of materials are very important to produce cost-effective good quality of concrete. This article will explain you the simple techniques used by engineers to calculate cement, sand, coarse aggregate(gravel or Jalli) and water needed to prepare different concrete grades like M5, M7.5, M10, M15 and M20.

Based on strength, concrete is classified into different grades like M5, M7.5, M10, M15, M20 etc. In concrete grades, the letter M stands for Mix and the following number stands for characteristic compressive strength of concrete in 28 days in the Direct Compression test.

Concrete mix ratios are prescribed ratio of cement, sand and aggregate to get the desired strength in concrete. The volumetric mix ratio of M20 concrete is 1:1.5:3, hence 1 part of cement, 1.5 part of sand and 3 part of aggregate in volume is needed to prepare M20 grade concrete.

However, above concrete mix ratios may not be accurately followed in the construction site. This may be due to a few reasons such as to increase workability (by increasing fine aggregate River sand and M sand) or to reduce cost (by reducing cement content) etc.,

Excess reducing of cement content or increase of sand content will adversely affect the strength of concrete. Hence it is advisable not to increase the fine aggregate (river sand and M sand) content more than 30% above the prescribed ratio in any case.

While mixing of ingredients, cement and sand(fine aggregate) have to fill the gaps between the coarse aggregate before taking their own space. Hence in order to prepare 1 cubic meter of M20, M15 and M10 concrete you need 1.57 cubic meters of total dry volume: of cement, sand and aggregate and incase of M7.5 and M5 concrete you need 1.52 cubic meters total dry volume of cement sand and aggregate.

Many websites are giving different value for total dry volume, but the values given above have been personally verified, many times, and they are in par with different governments Rates of Analysis.

Weight of cement required can be calculated from multiplying the volume of cement with the bulk density of cement. The bulk density of frequently used cement varieties (both PPC and OPC) is 1440 kg/cu.m.

Suppliers sell sand and coarse aggregate in the measurement of Cubic Feet (CFT), UNITS and in lorry or tipper LOADS. One UNIT measurement is equal to 100 cubic feet. One cubic meter is 35.32 Cubic feet.

*As I have explained above, while calculating M7.5 and M5 grade concrete, total dry material required for concrete is taken as 1.52 instead of 1.55 and quantity of sand and aggregate is adjusted for M10 and M5 based on experience.

Lets find out the quantity needed to prepare M20 grade by the codal procedure. Sand is confirmed to Zone II average grading. The ratio of fine to coarse aggregate is chosen as usual as 1:2. From the above table we know we need 250kg of total dry aggregate for our concrete.

For design mix concrete water content is calculated from Wate/Cement ratio which depends on various factors like the weight of cement, workability etc. But for nominal mix concrete IS456 codebook suggests the following quantities per bag of cement.

Sir you have given the derivation to calculate coarse and fine aggregate in kg for one bag of cement.But I need in CFT for one cft of cement how much coarse ,fine aggregate needed in CFT and water required in lit as per IS- 456 & IS-10262 can pls share the derivation for CFT calculation

very nice information shared, but i think this is nice to understand to mechanism of concrete mixing, but at every site material composition is changed, thus it is necessary to provide specimen of material to laboratory for testing so that they can confirm accordingly. appreciated to nice information.

For Road M 10, M 15 concrete may be used. For any kind of building different grade of concrete is used in different parts of the building. For example foundation, PCC M7.5 and M10 are used but for floor slab only grade above M20 should be used.

Weight to volume ratio of SAND AND AGGREGATE are different in different grades i.e. M20 M15 etc. How has this difference crept in and confuse us? Quantities of components should not differ whether we follow weight method or volume method. M20 85 kg=15 cft M15 110 kg=15.82 cft M10 160 kg=16.64 cft M5 265 kg=16.64 cft (All sand quantities) this is to be corrected to avoid propogation of wrong information. Corrected quantities may be mailed to me or correct explanation may be mailed to me. K.E. Ansar

I understand your question. You should understand that Nominal Mix concrete and Design mix concrete are both different. Though they both have the same Grade name, nominal mix concrete is usually designed for higher strength then mix design concrete. This is due to the fact that while designing nominal mix concrete we dont consider various factors like the type of sand and compactness of sand and, presence of moisture absorbtion. To put it simply that while designing nominal mix concrete, we design for bulk densities of the materials which vary based on the compaction of the material. So, 1. weight to volume ratio WILL differ as any nominal ratio prescribed are only approximation as stated in code books for the reason mentioned above. 2. Quantities of the material will differ but only in acceptable range. 3. The quantities given above are in par with Rate of Analysis of various states and the quantities in the weight given is directly from IS456 recommendation for Nominal mix concrete. If you want accurate proportion and know what you are doing then calculate bulk density of sand and aggregate supplied to your site and tweek the weight proportion ratio to get the volume proportion. The cushion should be provided because the volume is not absolute like weight it differs based on compaction, grading and moisture content of the aggregate.

sir , 1.how to calculated the one cubic feet 20mm mixer rate & labhour charge 2.how to calculated the one cubic feet size stone/bricks massonary rate & labhour charge 3.how to calculated the one cubic feet staricase material, rate & labhour charge 4.how to calculated the one cubic feet size earth work rate & charge

I would like to know the approximate total cost for M20 concrete when I use 645 bags of cement of 50 Kg using Msand and 20 mm aggregate..Approx cost is 380 Rs per bag. Would appreciate your quick feedback. Tx

we recently engaged in a contract with a builder and he says 1:3:4 ratio for concrete. he says he normally do this for 2 floor buildings. Is this ratio a good one? please suggest at the earliest. Thanks

Good morning sir, It is very useful information. Now I have started G+2 building construction in 2000SFT (Ground floor area). I have given the contract for construction. They are using 1 : 2.5 : 3 (Actually they have suggested 1 : 2.5 : 3.5 ) for concrete and 1 : 6 for brick work. We are using Ultratech 53 grade cement (OPC) cement. May I know is it good?

Contractors usually add extra sand to reduce the cement content and also to increase the workability(consistency) of concrete. The strength of the concrete greatly depends on the density of the concrete hence we should not play with the ratio of sand to aggregate. I would suggest the ratio of 1:2:3 or 1:1.5:3 for M20 grade concrete and 1:2:4 or 1:2.5:3.5 for M15 grade concrete.

If you prepare concrete with your ration then the concrete will have too much sand. Too much sand causes shrinkage and this will not give high-density concrete. Hence use 1:2:3 for good strength and 1:2.5:3.5 for moderate strength.

If you want to increase strength then reduce the water content and use Chemical admixtures like super plasticisers. If you want good compaction and high density then you can use two different types of aggregates like 10mm aggregate and 20mm aggregate.

I dont think that is a good ratio to obtain good quality of concrete, Mr. Hussain. You will end up using too much sand which is not good for concrete. Maybe 1:3:5 is a good ratio. Either way, you should follow the same procedure given above.

It very easy. Make Excel sheet with the help of Excel formula. And entre data of m20 concrete carefully from the book of estimating costing. Once u will create u can see any quantity of M grade of material. In few seconds just by chang the value but it before all u need to well knowledge of MS. Excell . If u need reliable excel formate data contact me on FB Id vishv Dev bhagat

Sir, how do I calculated or determine the quantity of materials required per cubic meter by weight to create a concrete mix? the specifications are: 1. maximum size aggregate 1.1/2 in. 2. cement content 8 bags per cubic meter 3. W/C ratio 0.65 4. assume air voids 6% of aggregate volume.

There is no nominal mix ratio for m25 grade. some people will say that m25 grade is 1:1:2 but they are wrong. Codebook says that concrete above M20 grade should be designed only by procedure from the IS10262

In your case Volume of concrete = 1.7 x 1.7 x 0.5 = 1.4 cu.m It looks like you are using m20 grade mix with extra sand. If you follow that mix proportion then to calculate use this following method. Total ratio = 1 + 2 + 3 = 6 Cement required = (1/6) x 1.5 = 0.25 cu.m (refer the post to change cu.m to bags) Sand = 0.25 x 2 = 0.5 cu.m Aggregate = 0.25 x 3 = 0.75 cu.m

how much cement sand & aggregate required for m10 concrete - civil sir

how much cement sand & aggregate required for m10 concrete - civil sir

How much cement sand & aggregate required for M10 concrete, hi guys in this article we know about how much cement sand & aggregate required per 1m3 of m10 grade of concrete & also know about how much cement required for M10 concrete & how to calculate cement sand aggregate required for 1 cubic metre of m10 grade of concrete.

Different grade of concrete like M25,M20,M15,M10,M7.5 & M5 are nominal mix grade of concrete in which M represent mix and numerical figure 25, 20, 15,10,7.5 & 5 are characteristics of compressive strength of concrete gain strength time period of 28 days after curing.

Understanding grade of concrete:- Grades of concrete are defined by its strength and composition of the concreting material cement sand and aggregate and the minimum strength the concrete should have following 28 days of initial construction. The grade of concrete is understood in measurements of N/mm2 or MPa, where M stands for mix and the MPa denotes the overall characteristics of compressive strength.

concrete grade types :- there are three types of concrete grade 1) normal grade of concrete, 2) standard grade of concrete& 3) high strength concrete grade. Normal grade of concrete are based on nominal mix ratio of cement, sand and aggregate have comparatively lower compressive strength than standard grade of concrete.

According to nominal mix concrete IS456 code book suggest that minimum grade of concrete is M20 which are used for RCC work and M5,M7.5, M10 and M15 are not used for RCC work, generally lower grade of concrete are used in mass concreting, formation of heavy wall, ground filling, retaining wall formation and all PCC work.

standard grade of concrete and high strength concrete are used to construction of high rise building, industrial building, commercial building, residential building, apartment, Bridge, dams and heavy structure.

Design mix concrete IS 456 code book suggest that standard and high strength concrete grade are made according to different types of considering factor like load bearing structure, earthquake resistance, bending moment of column, Environmental factors and quality of cement sand and aggregate.

step 2 :- m10 nominal mix ratio is 1:3:6,in which one part is cement, 3 part is sand & 6 part is aggregate, then total mix proportion is equal to 1+3+6 = 10, and part of cement is equal to 1/10, part of sand is equal to 3/10 & part of aggregate is equal to 6/10

We have given dry volume of concrete is equal to 1.54 cubic metre and part of sand in concrete mix is equal to 3/10, density of sand is equal to 1620 Kg/m3 and one cubic metre is equal to 35.3147 cu ft

We have given dry volume of concrete is equal to 1.54 cubic metre and part of aggregate in concrete mix is equal to 6/10, density of aggregate is equal to 1550 Kg/m3 and one cubic metre is equal to 35.3147 cu ft

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