what is a concrete nail? (with picture)

what is a concrete nail? (with picture)

A concrete nail is a type of mechanical fastener used to secure objects into masonry and other hard and brittle materials. Nailing into masonry requires the right type of nail, a good quality hammer, and some technique. Concrete nails are often used in building construction and in home improvement projects, such as finishing a basement. A concrete nail is a special fastener and is different than a common iron nail.

A concrete nail has a head on one end, and a cylindrical shaft that tapers to a sharp point at its other end, to help engage the nail by penetrating into the objects being fastened. The cylindrical portion of the nail is known as the shank. The head of a concrete nail, which has a round shape, provides a positive mechanical stop, and a surface for a hammer to be used to pound the nail into the material. Concrete nails are also available without a head.

The shank is what gives concrete nails a very firm holding strength. The shank is usually short, thick, and often ribbed to provide piercing and clenching strength. There are a variety of shank types available, including smooth, ring, twisted, and twilled. The ribbed shanks provide surfaces that help to grip the concrete and reduce the chances that the nail will loosen and come out over time.

Concrete nails are most often used with a special power tool, known as a nail driver, which provides a strong hammering action to allow penetration of concrete. The tool generates a strong pounding action along the axis of the nail to drive it into the concrete in a single blow. Using a nail driver increases the ability of the nail to penetrate the concrete quickly and with less effort, and produces stronger and more accurate mechanical connections.

A concrete nail can also be hammered manually. It usually requires several blows with the hammer to fully sink the nail, and may result in reduced gripping strength and holding power. Pilot holes, which are slightly smaller than the diameter of the nail, are usually drilled into the concrete before manually hammering the nail. Pilot holes help to maintain the accuracy of the hole, and reduce the force needed to pound the nail in.

Concrete nails come in different diameters, lengths, and shank types to meet a wide variety of applications. A concrete nail is normally harder than a common iron nail. Galvanized concrete nails are the most common type, and are widely used. These are made of high-quality carbon steel and are zinc-plated to provide strength and corrosion resistance.

When it comes to using concrete nails, I really think that putting them in place with a nail driver is your best option. Though hammering them manually can be done, it is time-consuming, hard work. The force of the hammer on the concrete nails might also cause the concrete around them to crack or chip, which could result in you having to replace some of your concrete blocks. Manufacturers make many types of nail drivers, so you should be able to find one that will fit into your budget. Think of it this way: the money you spend will be less than the cost of repairs if you run into problems hammering your concrete nails.

Manufacturers make many types of nail drivers, so you should be able to find one that will fit into your budget. Think of it this way: the money you spend will be less than the cost of repairs if you run into problems hammering your concrete nails.

Manufacturers make many types of nail drivers, so you should be able to find one that will fit into your budget. Think of it this way: the money you spend will be less than the cost of repairs if you run into problems hammering your concrete nails.

I'm wondering how difficult is it to hammer a concrete nail manually? I need to place some concrete nails into concrete blocks, and I really don't want to invest the money into buying a concrete nail driver.

concrete nails & masonry nails for concrete and other hard substrates

concrete nails & masonry nails for concrete and other hard substrates

With special materials, concrete nails are specialty nails compared with common iron nails . In practical application, people also used to call it masonry nails. These nails are the most popular fasteners for securing objects into masonry and other hard & brittle materials. There are complete types of concrete nails, including galvanized concrete nails, color concrete nails, black concrete nails, bluish concrete nails with various special nail heads and shank types. Shank types include smooth shank, twilled shank for different substrate hardness. With above features, concrete nails offer excellent piecing and fixing strength for firm and strong sites.

how to use a concrete nail gun

how to use a concrete nail gun

Any number of home remodeling projects may require that you attach wood framing members to concrete or masonry surfaces. For example, if you are building a new partition wall in a basement or on a concrete slab, you'll need to anchor the sole plate to the concrete floor. This can be a tedious process if you aredriving nails by hand, requiring you to drill pilot holes with a hammer drill and masonry bit. But the task becomes exponentially easier if you use a powder-actuated concrete nail gun.

If you have more than a couple of concrete nails to driveor if you just like using gadgets designed for specialized tasksyou should buy or borrow a nail gun designed for concrete. Officially known as a powder-actuatednailer, this tool goesunder different names, including gun nailer, .22 nailer, power nailer, or by the trademarked brand name Ramset.

A concrete nail gun is a dead-simple tool consisting of a hollow metal barrel and a firing pin. Actual gunpowder from a modified .22-caliber shell propels specially designed nails through the wood and into the masonry. Either with a hammer blow or a trigger pull, a firing pin strikes the back of the shell, setting off a controlled explosion safely contained within the tool. Gas from the detonation escapes through the barrel and drives a nail that has been placed there.

There are several manufacturers of this tool, including Ramset, Dewalt, and Hilti. Some styles work by striking a hammer to the end of the tool, which sets off the gunpowder charge; others have a trigger that is pulled to fire the cartridge.

Beginners can find it tricky to get nails to penetrate to the proper depth. Either the concrete is too hard and the nail fires only partway into the material, or the masonry and workpiece are too soft, and the nail penetrates right through the wood. Remember that the depth of the nail will be controlled by several variables: the length of the nail, the thickness of the wood, the hardness of the masonry surface, and the size of the powder load.

Manufacturers offer several different powder loads to match different needs. Ramset has a simple-to-follow, color-coded set of guidelines that tells you which charge to use in conjunction with nail length and work material. One powder load manufacturer offers six different powder loadsgray, brown, green, yellow, red, and purplein order of increasing power.

Although the method is not perfect, you can roughly gauge the penetration needed with this test: Hit a nail onto the concrete or masonry surface, then examine the point of the nail. If the point of the nail flattens, the material is quite hard and will require a more powerful charge. If it penetrates easily, the masonry is soft and will require a less powerful charge. Poured concrete is typically quite hard, requiring a powerful charge to sink the nail, while cinderblock or other forms of brick are relatively soft.

Slide the nail into the barrel of the nailer at the barrel end, not through the chamber as you do with conventional firearms. The nail will enter the barrel head-first. Push the nail until the pointed end of the nail has cleared the barrel end. Do not push it any deeper than this.

The nails used in a concrete nailer are special fasteners designed for use with this tool. Most have a plastic sleeve and/or washer designed to keep the nail from penetrating through the wood. Never try to use standard nails with a powder-actuated concrete nail gun.

With the chamber open, place the powder load (shell cartridge) into the chamber. The narrow end of the load will be towards the barrel end of the tool. Slowly and carefully slide the chamber shut, as directed by the manufacturer. One manufacturer, Ramset, calls this the "semi-closed position." This means that the two reference grooves on the barrel are close to aligning but do not meet exactly.

Place the concrete nailer perpendicular (90 degrees) to your work material. Press down on the nailer until the two reference grooves on the barrel meet. The tool is now positioned so that the firing pin can strike the shell cartridge.

With a one-pound hammer, deliver one sharp blow to the metal peg on the back of the tool. The tool will fire, discharging the nail into the material. If the nailer does not fire, try striking it again. If the nailer only partially fires, eliminate the charge and nail from the nailer. Dispose of the charge, and try again with a new charge.

concrete nails vs. concrete screws

concrete nails vs. concrete screws

Concrete nails and screws are the most popular types of fasteners used in securing objects to concrete walls and blocks. These two types both have their own advantages and disadvantages. Here are a few things to remember when choosing which to use for your project.

A concrete nail is best used when you are joining wood to a concrete surface. This is mostly found when finishing off a basement, building, or garage on a poured slab. The nails can be driven through the lumber plate and into the concrete.

In the event that you need to attach some lumber to concrete, the nail can be driven into the concrete with a heavy construction hammer. However, one possible disadvantage is if the nail is not hit straight on, it can bend to one side. This will loosen the entire shaft and cause it to slide out of the hole easily. A special concrete nail gun can also be used to securely attach concrete nails by "shooting" them into the slab or wall.

When working with concrete screws, you need two items to install them correctly. A hammer drill is essential to the process, as it is needed to pre-drill a hole for the screw. Unlike drilling into wood, the screw cannot be driven into the concrete and expected to hold. If the area around the concrete chips, the screw can become loose. Also important for installing a concrete screw is a concrete anchor. This piece acts as a sleeve that the screw can tighten and press against the concrete to a secure hold.

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how to remove nails from concrete (step-by-step)

how to remove nails from concrete (step-by-step)

Britt Olizarowicz is the daughter of a home builder, former Real Estate agent, and Landscaping business owner. Through the years, Britt has successfully flipped several houses and has tackled countless DIY projects. Whether it is remodeling a bathroom, renovating a deck, or a solution to get your sink looking brand new, she has answers that can help.

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29 different types of construction nails (plus more!) - home stratosphere

29 different types of construction nails (plus more!) - home stratosphere

Nails are one of the most enduring and most common construction materials. Building a wooden house alone can entail 20,000 to 30,000 of nails used. Originally, nails were made of bronze. Then came copper and eventually iron.

No surprise here, but this is the most common, everyday type of nail that is used for a variety of simple and complex jobs. Of course, they can be used for business-related tasks as well and they range in size from one to six inches in length. Taken together, these types of nails are often called spikes and they can be used in everything from basic inside chores to more complex outside jobs. Even though nails were once sold by terminology defined by the penny for example, three-penny nails, four-penny nails, etc. today they are merely sold by the pound regardless of their type, making them a little easier to measure.

Box nails look a lot like common nails but are a little thinner. They are less likely to cause splits in the wood, thanks to their size; however, because they are so thin, they are not good for projects that need a lot of structural strength as they have less holding power than common nails. When purchasing box nails, keep in mind they range in size from one inch to three-and-a-half inches in length.

Roofing nails have round, large heads and heavy shafts and are usually made of aluminum or a highly galvanized material, which is done to prevent them from rusting. These nails are designed for tasks such as holding roofing materials in place, in particular asphalt-based and composite materials. Most roofing nails range in size from three-quarters of an inch to one-and-three-quarters of an inch, making them the perfect size for these types of jobs.

Masonry nails are what you want if you need to drive nails into a rock-hard surface such as bricks or concrete walls. There are several types of masonry nails available and they may be rectangular in sections or have shafts that are fluted. They are made this way so that they do not bend or break when driving them into a hard surface and you can use them for a variety of different projects. Because the concrete or brick may chip and fly away while youre working, it is always recommended that you use safety goggles when working with this type of nail.

When youre working on moldings or other projects that require the nail head not be obvious in the final product, the finishing nail is your smartest option. These nails are used in a variety of finishing jobs and have very small heads; therefore, they can be driven below the surface of the wood, making them unnoticeable once the job is complete. They are available in sizes from one inch to four inches in length and are used for a variety of different projects.

Casing nails are very similar to finishing nails but are a little larger and thicker. It has a little more holding power than the finishing nail and you can use it to attach moldings such as door and window casings or in other projects that require a little extra holding power.

Brads are unique in that they are finishing nails with a little less size and length and they are usually no more than one inch in length. If you need to make frames, perform basic cabinet work, or attach plywood paneling, brads are the perfect nails for you.

Although most workers use nail guns and the nails that go with them in place of these nails today, the spiral flooring nails were once used in subfloor work and have shafts that come in a spiral shape.

These nails are used for projects such as holding shingles or clapboards in place as well as paneling and under-layments. Commonly called siding nails, annular ring nails are usually made of galvanized steel and are thin, rust-resistant, and lined with rings so their holding power can be stronger.

A variation of the common nail, the duplex nail has dual heads with the second one being found a short distance down the nails shaft. It is most commonly used for temporary jobs that include staging and scaffolding, in part because it can be driven snugly into the material yet it is also easy to remove.

There are other, less-common nails that are used by both laypeople and professional construction workers alike, including nails that are coated with cement and with resin for extra holding power and drywall nails that are mostly used for hanging wallboard. In fact, any type of nail that doesnt fit into a regular category or that is uncommonly used can fit into this category.

Used mostly for rough carpentry jobs where strength is crucial, the round wire nail ranges in size from three-quarters of an inch to six inches in length. Even though it is strong, it is not necessarily an attractive nail so its best to use it when looks arent important or for jobs where the nail will be hidden.

Unlike the round wire nail, this one is attractive but can also be driven below the surface of the wood. It is good for joinery work and isnt very likely to split the wood, especially when its longer sides are parallel to the grain of the wood. The oval wire nail can be from half an inch in size to six inches long and are easily punched below the surface.

This type of nail is very strong and has numerous purposes. It is a great nail to use if you need one that you can punch below the surface of the wood. It ranges in size from half an inch to six inches in length.

As the name suggests, this nail has a twisted shaft that performs a screw-like action when you drive it into wood or other materials. Although a tad more expensive than regular nails, square twisted nails are more permanent and do a better job of attaching two items together for good.

These nails have an inverted cup head and a twisted shank, both of which work well if strength is what you need for your project. If you want to affix corrugated sheeting to timber, this is the nail that you want to purchase.

Upholstery nails usually come in brass, chrome, or other metallic finishes. Their dome head gives the project a very decorative look and there are numerous sizes available. They are often used as a secondary fixing with tacks.

A sprig is a very small nail that doesnt have a head and it is often used to hold glass in place in window frames before a putty job. The putty job then covers up the sprig and it ranges in size from half an inch to three-quarters of an inch

A staple nail looks a little similar to a regular staple with a U shape and two points at the end of each side. Most often used to hold different wires in position, staples have linings that are insulated and are perfect for repairing electric and flex cable.

Pay attention to the finishes on the nails. For greater holding power, choose nails that are coated in cement or vinyl; for better resistance to rust, choose nails with electrogalvanized or hot-galvanized coatings.

Decide how important rust resistance is to your project. Aluminum nails resist rust the best and if you are working on screening or aluminum siding, this is the nail to use. Stainless steel nails wont break down or corrode; therefore, they are great if youre working with redwood or cedar. Furthermore, stainless steel nails wont streak or stain your wood.

Pay attention to all aspects of your project. If you are working with very fine materials, brads are the best nails to use. This is because brads have lighter gauges and smaller heads than other types of nails, allowing them to be concealed a lot more easily.

Vinyl Coatings: These coatings serve two main purposes: they reduce friction and therefore the nail is easier to drive, although the friction still generates a certain amount of heat. The second purpose has to do with the vinyl melting after it is driven into the wood, which causes the vinyl to adhere to both the wood and the nail. This means that the nail is more difficult to remove but if you want something permanent, this is a good thing. In addition, most vinyl coatings are usually yellow or green in color.

Hot-Dipped, Galvanized Coatings: These coatings make the nail resistant to rust and if youre worried about moisture causing the fastener to deteriorate, these galvanized nails are the perfect solution. They are also great for wood that is pressure-treated because the copper used in the treatment of the wood could corrode metal nails if they werent galvanized.

Stainless Steel Coatings: These arent technically a coating but they do a great job of making the nails rust-resistant. Although a bit more expensive than regular coated nails, they are well worth the cost if resistance to rust is something crucial for your project.

Nail sizes are usually measured in pennies, indicated by the letter d. The longer nails get, the bigger the diameter of the wires gets, and the largest nails, which are six inches in length, are usually called spikes. Below is the size in pennies versus the length of the nails in inches.

When buying nails, keep in mind the old system that some stores still use. Nail size is indicated by the letter d, which signals the word penny. Many decades ago, if 100 nails cost three pence, that measure was known as three penny nails, 100 nails costing four pence were called four penny nails, and so forth. Although most stores now sell nails by the pound, it is good to be a little familiar with this type of measurement in case you run into a store that hasnt changed their way of measuring nails. As a general rule, the gauge indicates how thick a nail is; the thicker the nails are, the lower their numbers are.

how to put a nail in a concrete wall: 10 steps (with pictures)

how to put a nail in a concrete wall: 10 steps (with pictures)

This article was co-authored by James Mansfield. James Mansfield is a Construction and Design Specialist and the CEO of WestVillage General Contracting, a high-end and luxury design/build firm in New York City. James specializes in apartment, bathroom, and kitchen remodeling as well as fine cabinetry, lighting, paint, and wallpaper. James has developed a proprietary system of construction called the Luxury Build Method that hinges on a skilled team, respected partnerships, and clear, transparent communication. WestVillage GC has completed more than 500 commercial and residential projects in New York with designers such as David Scott Interiors and Fox Nahem, Kelly Behun. WestVillage GC is also a preferred contractor for Related buildings including Hudson Yards. This article has been viewed 29,649 times.

The toughness and durability of concrete makes it a popular building material for walls. Concrete walls can also add a modern, industrial aesthetic to a room. However, their strength and durability can make it difficult to drive nails into them. Fortunately, there are specialized tools and materials you can use to make the job easier. To minimize the risk of cracking the concrete, youll want to use a hammer-set anchor nail. You could also drive masonry nails into the wall for an easy and convenient option.

search results for

search results for "concrete nails"

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nails - hand drive, reversible, coil, & more | fastenerusa

nails - hand drive, reversible, coil, & more | fastenerusa

Every construction, reconstruction, development and/or redevelopment project requires every piece of the puzzle to fit together with a sound and unwavering sturdiness. At FastenerUSA, we recognize how important it is that both professionals and weekend warriors have the resources they need to bring projects to life, and we pride ourselves on making them accessible and affordable right here on our site.

Whether you are making improvements around the home or office, renovating an existing property, or starting afresh on a new creation either professionally or for personal use, FastenerUSA.com has an extensive supply of common and also hard-to-find nails and fasteners readily available to get your project completed.

Feel free to browse throughout our site and discover the vast line we supply to our customers. If you are in the market for hand drive nails, reversible nails, coil, strip, or even hot dip galvanized nails, we got you covered. And remember with FastenerUSA.com, all shipments are free of charge anywhere in the USA including Alaska and Hawaii, with no minimum whatsoever.

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what are cement coated nails used for?

what are cement coated nails used for?

Beside above, what are different types of nails used for? Special types of nails include: Casing: For use on small mouldings or thin plywood. Brads: Very narrow nails that provide a neat finish. Glazing sprig: A wedge-shaped nail that can be used with putty to secure glazing. Cap nail: Includes a plastic cap and is commonly used for nailing building fabrics.

Sinker nails are used for framing and general construction applications. They are generally shorter and thinner than common nails. The cement coating on these nails increases holding power. Our Cement Coated Sinker Nails have a smooth flat head designed for an elegant finish.

For that reason most nails for general use have diamond-shaped points, which combine elements of both kinds. Even so, carpenters often deliberately blunt the points of general-purpose nails to insure further against splitting. They do that before driving the nails near the ends of boards or into brittle wood.

The principle is similar with a screw, except a screw has threads. The tip of the screw is pressed into the wood and as you turn it, the spiraling threads of the screw wedge themselves in between the grain fibers and pull the screw down into the wood. In short: nails are held in by pressure/friction of the wood fibers.

What is the difference between a common, box, cooler and sinker nail? Common nails have larger diameter shanks than box, cooler or sinker nails of the same penny weight. The heavy shank allows them to carry higher structural loads. Box nails have lighter (smaller diameter) shanks.

Galvanized and Vinyl Sinkers When toenailing, which means to drive nails at an angle to secure a butt joint, 8d nails are best. Interior framing nails have a vinyl coating to make them easier to drive. They are known as vinyl sinkers. When doing exterior framing, framers use galvanized nails, which are rust resistant.

Concrete nails are made of hardened steel and have fluted shafts that help them sink into the concrete. You can also use masonry nails, which have a square cross-section and are tapered from the head to the tip. Masonry nails are cheaper than concrete nails and have less of a tendency to break or bend.

Drive the masonry nails directly into concrete walls with a hammer. Masonry nails are hardened and have grooved shafts and flat heads. Masonry nails should penetrate the surface of the concrete wall to a depth of 3/4 to 1 inch for a solid hold.

Here is a very easy method for attaching that wood to concrete without using all those concrete anchors. You will need a hammer drill, 20 ounce hammer and some 16d nails. Insert a 1/4" masonry drill bit, 4 or 6 inches long, into the hammer drill. Drill through the wood and into the concrete.

Walls are built from the ground up. Cut pressure treated 2" x 4" boards to length and lay them along the chalk line. Use a hammer drill with 3/16" masonry bit to drill a hole through the wood and into the concrete floor. Use an impact driver to drive a 3" Tapcon screw through the wood and into the floor.

Trying to screw or nail into concrete sounds like a near-impossible task. But attaching to concrete really isn't much more difficult than fastening to woodif you use the correct tools and specialized fasteners. Before installing most concrete fasteners, you must first drill a hole using a carbide-tipped masonry bit.

The 10 Best Nail Guns For Concrete Senco SCP40XP. REVIEW. Max HN120 PowerLite. REVIEW. Bostitch MIII812CNCT. REVIEW. Freeman PCN65. REVIEW. Hitachi NC40G. REVIEW. Freeman PSSCP. REVIEW. Air Locker CN64A3. REVIEW. Apach LHT-64. REVIEW. The Apach LHT-64 (appx.

Which Artificial Nail Type is Best? Gel and acrylic nails work similarly, except that acrylic or porcelain nails are harder on your natural nail. The gel nail can strengthen shorter nails and make finder look longer. Acrylic nails also look less natural, especially if they are applied incorrectly.

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Here are common nail sizes and their corresponding length. 2d 1-inch. 3d 1-1/4-inches. 4d 1-1/2-inches. 5d 1-3/4-inches. 6d 2-inches. 8d 2-1/2-inches. 10d 3-inches. 12d 3-1/4-inches.

The rule of thumb with nails 2 points if you get the pun is that you should choose a nail that is three times as long as the thickness of the material you are fastening. If you want to hold 1/2" drywall to a stud wall, the length of the nails should be at least 1 1/2". This is a reasonable guide most of the time.

what is a concrete nail gun? (with pictures)

what is a concrete nail gun? (with pictures)

A concrete nail gun is a specialized nail gun that is used to drive nails into concrete. Nail guns are often used in industrial settings and in home improvement projects because they make nailing faster and less labor intensive. Instead of drilling a hole in the concrete and manually hammering the nail into place, builders can easily attach wood or other materials to concrete using the the concrete nail gun's explosive power.

Powder-actuated nail guns are preferred for nailing concrete and other hard materials because they generate more power than other types of nail guns. These guns use gunpowder and operate under the same basic principle as a firearm. An explosive charge is fired, which forces the nail into the substrate. In a high-velocity powder-actuated concrete nail gun, the explosion acts directly on the nail, and in a low-velocity gun, the explosion compresses a piston that forces the nail down.

Concrete nail guns are highly specialized tools designed to be used only on concrete or other very hard substrates. The large amount of force generated by the gun might break other materials, such as wood or cement. Concrete nail guns also use special nails known as concrete nails, which come in a variety of sizes and often feature fluted shanks for better gripping power. Concrete nails contain more carbon and are harder than other types of nails.

High-velocity concrete nail guns are often restricted to industrial uses such as shipbuilding, but it is possible to buy more lightweight concrete nail guns at a home improvement store or over the Internet. Many homeowners use concrete nail guns to refurbish basement areas. They can come in handy for nailing fuse boxes to concrete walls, attaching wood frames to a foundation or creating shelving for storage.

Safety is a concern when operating a concrete nail gun, because the internal explosion in the gun can generate a force comparable to that of a firearm. Like firearms, concrete nail guns incorporate safety features such as a muzzle locking system. Professionals who use nail guns frequently choose to become certified through training programs provided by nail gun manufacturers. Safety glasses, gloves and earplugs are recommended for anyone using a concrete nail gun.

When correctly operated, a concrete nail gun is an effective tool, but injuries can and do occur from misuse. Concrete nail guns are fired with the muzzle directly pressed up against the concrete substrate. In some models, the front end contact point and trigger must be compressed simultaneously to fire, and in others, the nose end must be compressed first. If these techniques are not followed, injuries to the hands can often occur. Thousands of people are injured by nail guns each year, and the majority of the injuries likely could have been prevented through correct use.

galvanized & hardened concrete nails

galvanized & hardened concrete nails

With special materials, concrete nails are specialty nails compared with common iron nails. It is harder, the shank is short and thick commonly and it has excellent piecing and fixing strength. With these features, concrete nails make ideal nails and fasteners for firm and strong sites. Galvanized concrete nails offer excellent anti-bending, anti-crack and safety uses due to the processing of advanced heat treatment technology. It is made from high quality The nail surface treatment can be polished, electro galvanizing, blackish, etc. We can also supply screw shank, T cap and other special concrete nails according to your specific requirements. We offers complete types of concrete nails covering galvanized concrete nails, color concrete nails, black concrete nails, bluish concrete nails and concrete nails with various special nail heads and shank types. Common diameter sizes for galvanized concrete nails are 1.75.0mm and the nail length goes from 16mm to 50mm. Hardened Concrete Nails Models: OVAL HEAD CONCRETE NAIL, HARDENED, BLACK (OR BLUE) FINISHING C1045 OR EQUIVALENT STEEL , 45 - 55 HRC, 20-25 KG PER BOX Sizes: 2.0mm x 15mm 2,0mm x 20mm 2,0mm x 1" 2.0mm x 30mm 2,0mm x 40mm 2.5mm x 30mm 2,5mm x 1 1/2" 2,5mm x 2" Models: FLAT HEAD CONCRETE NAIL HARDENED, BLACK (OR BLUE) FINISHING C1045 OR EQUIVALENT STEEL , 45 - 55 HRC, 20-25 KG PER BOX Sizes: 3.0mm x 1 1/2" 3.0mm x 2" 3.0mm x 2 1/2" 3.5mm x 90mm 3.5mm x 100mm Models: FLAT HEAD VERTICAL NIBS CONCRETE NAIL HARDENED, ZINC PLATED (OR GALVANIZED) C1045 OR EQUIVALENT STEEL , 45 - 55 HRC, 20-25 KG PER BOX Sizes: 2,7mm x 19 mm 2,7mm x 25 mm 2,7mm x 30 mm 2,7mm x 38 mm 2,7mm x 50 mm 2,7mm x 63 mm 3,5mm x 35 mm 3,5mm x 55 mm 3,5mm x 65 mm 3,5mm x 75 mm 4.3mm x 90mm Models: FLAT HEAD HELIX NIBS CONCRETE NAILS HARDENED, ZINC PLATED (OR GALVANIZED) C1045 OR EQUIVALENT STEEL , 45 - 55 HRC, 20-25 KG PER BOX Sizes: 2,0mm x 3/4" 2,5mm x 1" 2,5mm x 1 1/4" 3,0mm x 1 1/2" 3,0mm x 1 3/4" 3,0mm x 2" Models: L TYPE NAIL VERTICAL NIBS HARDENED, ZINC PLATED (OR GALVANIZED) C1045 OR EQUIVALENT STEEL , 45 - 55 HRC, 20-25 KG PER BOX Sizes: 3.0 x 1" 3.0 x 1 1/2" 3.0 x 2" Galvanized Steel Concrete NailsSmooth Shank or Twilled Shank Nail Sizes 1.820mm 4.275mm Nail Sizes 225mm 4.57100mm Nail Sizes 340mm 4.880mm Nail Sizes 3.450mm 4.890mm Nail Sizes 3.865mm 5125mm Black Concrete Nails/Bluish Concrete Nails Nail Sizes 220mm 225mm 230mm Nail Sizes 2.525mm 2.530mm 2.540mm Nail Sizes 330mm 340mm 350mm Nail Sizes 360mm 360mm 370mm Nail Sizes 380mm 390mm 3100mm Nail Sizes 4.275mm 4.2100mm 4.2125mm Color Concrete Nails Nail Sizes 325mm 330mm 3.240mm Nail Sizes 3.650mm 460mm 4.275mm Nail Sizes 4.2100mm Sunk-Head Concrete Nails Nail Sizes 2.525mm 2.530mm 2.540mm Nail Sizes 330mm 340mm 3.250mm Nail Sizes 3.665mm 475mm 4.2100mm K Concrete Nails / T Concrete Nails Nail Sizes 325mm 340mm 3.825mm Nail Sizes 3.840mm 3.850mm 3.865mm Nail Sizes 3.875mm 3.8100mm Packing of Concrete Nails 20-25KG/Carton in Bulk 20-25KG/Wooden Box in Bulk 100Pieces/Box Then Cartons 75Pieces/Box Then Cartons 400Gram/Box 50Boxes/Paper Carton 500Gram/Box 40Boxes/Paper Carton Learn more about our Galvanized Iron Concrete Nails.

With special materials, concrete nails are specialty nails compared with common iron nails. It is harder, the shank is short and thick commonly and it has excellent piecing and fixing strength. With these features, concrete nails make ideal nails and fasteners for firm and strong sites. Galvanized concrete nails offer excellent anti-bending, anti-crack and safety uses due to the processing of advanced heat treatment technology. It is made from high quality The nail surface treatment can be polished, electro galvanizing, blackish, etc. We can also supply screw shank, T cap and other special concrete nails according to your specific requirements. We offers complete types of concrete nails covering galvanized concrete nails, color concrete nails, black concrete nails, bluish concrete nails and concrete nails with various special nail heads and shank types. Common diameter sizes for galvanized concrete nails are 1.75.0mm and the nail length goes from 16mm to 50mm.

Models: OVAL HEAD CONCRETE NAIL, HARDENED, BLACK (OR BLUE) FINISHING C1045 OR EQUIVALENT STEEL , 45 - 55 HRC, 20-25 KG PER BOX Sizes: 2.0mm x 15mm 2,0mm x 20mm 2,0mm x 1" 2.0mm x 30mm 2,0mm x 40mm 2.5mm x 30mm 2,5mm x 1 1/2" 2,5mm x 2"

Models: FLAT HEAD CONCRETE NAIL HARDENED, BLACK (OR BLUE) FINISHING C1045 OR EQUIVALENT STEEL , 45 - 55 HRC, 20-25 KG PER BOX Sizes: 3.0mm x 1 1/2" 3.0mm x 2" 3.0mm x 2 1/2" 3.5mm x 90mm 3.5mm x 100mm

Models: FLAT HEAD VERTICAL NIBS CONCRETE NAIL HARDENED, ZINC PLATED (OR GALVANIZED) C1045 OR EQUIVALENT STEEL , 45 - 55 HRC, 20-25 KG PER BOX Sizes: 2,7mm x 19 mm 2,7mm x 25 mm 2,7mm x 30 mm 2,7mm x 38 mm 2,7mm x 50 mm 2,7mm x 63 mm 3,5mm x 35 mm 3,5mm x 55 mm 3,5mm x 65 mm 3,5mm x 75 mm 4.3mm x 90mm

Models: FLAT HEAD HELIX NIBS CONCRETE NAILS HARDENED, ZINC PLATED (OR GALVANIZED) C1045 OR EQUIVALENT STEEL , 45 - 55 HRC, 20-25 KG PER BOX Sizes: 2,0mm x 3/4" 2,5mm x 1" 2,5mm x 1 1/4" 3,0mm x 1 1/2" 3,0mm x 1 3/4" 3,0mm x 2"

Nail Sizes 220mm 225mm 230mm Nail Sizes 2.525mm 2.530mm 2.540mm Nail Sizes 330mm 340mm 350mm Nail Sizes 360mm 360mm 370mm Nail Sizes 380mm 390mm 3100mm Nail Sizes 4.275mm 4.2100mm 4.2125mm

We regard quality as base for the development of company, we have built our quality control system to guarantee good quality products and satisfactory services are provided to our customer. Special size and specification are available according to customers' requirement.

9 best concrete nail guns 2021 | reviews & guide

9 best concrete nail guns 2021 | reviews & guide

This amazing tool sweeps in to save the day when even the most common and versatile tools like hammers and other powder actuated equipment to give up on you, which is exactly why I recommend concrete nail guns to be an essential tucked under your tool belt at all times, especially if you perform remodeling jobs regularly.

Whether youre a home-based DIYer who likes doing everything on their own or a professional who is always short on time, a concrete nail gun is an option worth considering that would simplify your life in more ways than you think. Its time to get you well acquainted with theBest concrete nail gunsavailable in the market.

Concrete nail guns come in three different types, namely: Battery operated, pneumatic, which is powered with the help of an air compressor, and electrical that needs a power outlet with a steady electricity supply to function.

If you prefer portability and most of your work is done where the availability of a power outlet is rare, a battery operated nail gun will be best; however, if you already own an air compressor and mostly work in areas that have outlets, the other two options might prove to be better.

For a comfortable working experience, make sure you test out the weight of the nail gun. Do keep in mind that most lightweight nail guns arent recommended for heavy-duty work; however, you may be able to find exceptions in the market.

Since Im already on the topic of ease to you, use and comfort are attentive to the design and extra features offered, such as grip handlers and rafters hooks by each product, as they can make your projects significantly pleasant to work on.

Heres a list of the elite, concrete nail guns that stand out for their amazing performance, great customer feedback, and distinct features that make them one of the best options available in the market today.

When it comes to nail guns made by Bostitch, you know you will receive a reliable product and of great quality. This particular nail gun is a favorite among professionals primarily because of its heavy-duty usage.

The companys experience speaks for itself once you test out this tool. Home-based DIYers should especially pay attention to this tool and test it out because they will find it incredibly safe and convenient.

Its a hassle-free nail gun that simplifies your work. Its easily the flash of all nail guns for concrete as it can fire up to 750 nails on a single gas refill, saving you from skyrocketing utility bills.

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