chevy transmissions: muncie 4 speed m22 rockcrusher.. - got transmissions got transmissions

chevy transmissions: muncie 4 speed m22 rockcrusher.. - got transmissions got transmissions

Chevy Transmissions: Muncie M22 Rock Crusher 4 Speeds were made From 1965 TO 1974: The most popular transmission of its time for high performance cars built for Chevrolet and all performance oriented G.M cars. They have the same gear ratios as the legendary M21 but with a heavy duty gearset. Well it was not designed so that you could go drag racing on Saturday night or impress girls in front of Burger King by doing massive hole shots. It was primarily designed as a road race transmission. The straighter angle of the gearset produced less heat and less end loading of the gear train. Combined with high impact alloy gears this 4 speed really pushed the limits of its aluminum case in drag race applications. Although the gears are not spur gears ( completely straight ) they still produced a fair amount of gear noise thus the Rockcrusher name. These 4 speeds sound like a blower drive whining. When I owned a 1966 Corvette with the Rat Motor it came with a m22 transmission. After I broke two or three of them, which were all replace by used transmissions, I decided to rebuilt my own unit. So I got a hold of a set of low ratio gears, which were made for drag racing as opposed to road racing, my problem was solved. Of course, once I solved my transmission breakage issues, I developed clutch breakage problems. That is an entire story in itself. Although the M-series transmissions are defunct, plenty of requests come in for used and rebuilt units. There are not any more used Muncie transmissions from that era available without getting lucky. You can buy Muncie transmissions from GotTransmissions.com with high quality American made gears and bearings with a single phone call. The number is 866-320-1182. We have them in stock at affordable prices with an excellent warranty. Call now for immediate delivery.

Chevy Transmissions: Muncie M22 Rock Crusher 4 Speeds were made From 1965 TO 1974: The most popular transmission of its time for high performance cars built for Chevrolet and all performance oriented G.M cars. They have the same gear ratios as the legendary M21 but with a heavy duty gearset.

Well it was not designed so that you could go drag racing on Saturday night or impress girls in front of Burger King by doing massive hole shots. It was primarily designed as a road race transmission. The straighter angle of the gearset produced less heat and less end loading of the gear train. Combined with high impact alloy gears this 4 speed really pushed the limits of its aluminum case in drag race applications. Although the gears are not spur gears ( completely straight ) they still produced a fair amount of gear noise thus the Rockcrusher name. These 4 speeds sound like a blower drive whining.

When I owned a 1966 Corvette with the Rat Motor it came with a m22 transmission. After I broke two or three of them, which were all replace by used transmissions, I decided to rebuilt my own unit. So I got a hold of a set of low ratio gears, which were made for drag racing as opposed to road racing, my problem was solved.

Of course, once I solved my transmission breakage issues, I developed clutch breakage problems. That is an entire story in itself. Although the M-series transmissions are defunct, plenty of requests come in for used and rebuilt units. There are not any more used Muncie transmissions from that era available without getting lucky. You can buy Muncie transmissions from GotTransmissions.com with high quality American made gears and bearings with a single phone call. The number is 866-320-1182. We have them in stock at affordable prices with an excellent warranty. Call now for immediate delivery.

guide to muncie m20, m21, and m22 four-speed transmissions

guide to muncie m20, m21, and m22 four-speed transmissions

Few things excite like the sound and feel of an old-fashioned Chevrolet muscle car and that familiar whine of a classic Muncie four-speed transmission going through the gears. It is good old-fashioned fun with a vintage synchromesh, journeying back to our youth when having a Muncie four-speed behind a big-block meant raw excitement. According to Paul Cangialosi, Muncie transmission historian, technician, and author of Muncie 4-Speed Transmissions: How to rebuild and modify, the Muncie four-speed transmission has its roots back to 1935 and the U.S. patent number 3,088,336 along with an engineer named James W. Fodrea. This patent number, according to Cangialosi, can be found cast into most Muncie four-speed main cases. Fodrea's legacy is far-reaching, extending into popular transmissions around to this day, yet most have no idea who he was.

According to Cangialosi, two companies, Borg and Beck and Warner Gear, merged in 1928 to form BorgWarner. The T-85 three-speed transmission was one result of that merger. The T-10 four-speed was an evolution of the T-85 three-speed transmission, with both of these transmissions being quite similar in appearance. If you've ever looked at a BorgWarner T-10 and a Muncie four-speed and gotten them mixed up, you are not alone because the Muncie (M20, M21, and M22) is a direct descendant of the T-10 according to Cangialosi. The Saginaw four-speed box is quite similar to both the T-10 and Muncie four-speed transmissions. However, neither compares to the Muncie in terms of strength.

That the Muncie has much in common with the T-10 is no accident. It was a matter of economics when Chevrolet needed a four-speed manual transmission for the Corvette in the mid-1950s. According to Cangialosi, GM took the basic T-10 design and beefed it up to conceive the Muncie M20 and M21 four-speed transmissions, which arrived in 1963.

GM's goal with the Muncie four-speed was to produce a better shift employing larger synchro cones. He tells us both the M20 wide-ratio and M21 close-ratio transmissions were first offered in 1963. The M22 Rock Crusher would come later to accommodate the heavy twist of Chevrolet's big-blocks in the mid-1960s.

The M20 and M21 transmissions produced from 1963-'74 are easy to identify in both wide- and close-ratio units. The M22 to come later in 1967-'74 is also a close-ratio unit, but much stronger than the M21, with a higher torque capacity.

Because the Muncie has so much in common with the T-10 and even similar Saginaw boxes, it is easy to get this guy mixed up with non-Muncie units. Although the Muncie's bloodline goes way back, this legendary gearbox entered service for the Chevrolet Division in 1963. In fact, 1963 is a standalone year because changes in this box came almost immediately for 1964, beginning with the front bearing retainer, which was aluminum for 1963 and became cast-iron in 1964. The bearing bore size was also one year only with a #6207-style input shaft bearing, according to Cangialosi.

The early production Muncie four-speed case is the small-bore unit and can be identified by the GM casting number 3831704 (see Muncie M20/M21/M22 Main Case Identification chart). The large-bore Muncie came into production in 1964-'65 and became the standard from then on through the end of production in 1974. What makes the small-bore and large-bore case Muncies different is the input shaft bearing size and first gear, which rode on the mainshaft void of a bushing for 1963. For 1964 and beyond, it rode on a bushing between it and the mainshaft.

Cangialosi explains there were two basic mainshafts produced for the M20, M21, and M22 transmissions (see Input Shaft Identification chart). From 1963-'70, the Muncie was fitted with a 27-spline mainshaft and must have the corresponding slip yoke. For 1971-'74, a larger diameter, 32-spline mainshaft was employed along with the corresponding yoke. Because this mainshaft is larger, you're also going to need larger bushings and seals. Keep this in mind when you're searching for a Muncie transmission.

What you will find in your search for the right Muncie four-speed is conflicting information from different sources. Before you here are the basics of Muncie M20, M21, and M22 four-speed transmissions. Glean the basics and use them in your research. Expect to find various combinations out there because these high-performance four-speed transmissions have been thrashed, trashed, and rebuilt through the decades. You're going to find various combinations of main cases, tailshaft housings, and side covers coupled with variations inside of each case. Pure dumb luck will lead you to a completely unmolested Muncie.

One more way to identify the Muncie is via stamped codes in the case, which indicate when the transmission was built at Muncie (see How To Read Muncie Build Date Codes chart). According to Cangialosi, the date was based on model year, not necessarily the calendar year.

Of course, restorers and rebuilders will tend to re-stamp the date code to suit a particular restoration. This can add confusion to what you've found. Muncie transmissions also tend to get performance improvements such as a gear ratio change and stronger internal parts. This is when you have to remove the side cover to see what's inside. Examine the input and output shafts to see if you've found the box you want.

And finally, if forced to choose between a Muncie or the BorgWarner T-10, it is suggested you choose the Muncie due to its brute strength. The Muncie was originally a stronger alternative to the T-10 and Super T-10 because it could take the torque. If you find an M22, you have the ultimate Muncie designed for the high torque of a big-block that will bolt to your small-block.

new auto gear super case muncie m22 4-speed rock-crusher street/strip. camaro, corvette, chevelle, nova. summer sale on now!!! - muncie 4 speed transmissions and rebuild kits

new auto gear super case muncie m22 4-speed rock-crusher street/strip. camaro, corvette, chevelle, nova. summer sale on now!!! - muncie 4 speed transmissions and rebuild kits

New Super Heavy Duty Direct Replacement and Strongest M22s Made With Muncie Auto Gear Super Case and Strongest M22 Close Ratio or Wide Ratio Gears. 10 OR 26 spline input and large 27 OR 32 spline output shaft. C355 Forged Aluminum Mid-Plate. Super Tail. AG Roller Side Cover. A great Super Heavy Duty Rock Crusher M22 for your Camaro, Nova, Chevelle, Corvette or other GM car. Close Ratio = 2.20-1st, 1.64-2nd, 1.28-3rd, 4th direct. Wide Ratio = 2.56-1st, 1.75-2nd, 1.36-3rd, 4th direct or comp M22w 2.56-1st, 1.90-2nd, 1.48-3rd. Built for big HP.

My experience with MidWest Muncie has been the Best. Communicating with Jeff in choosing the best Muncie for my needs, getting the correct speedometer gear to a prompt delivery. Again, Thank You for the great customer service. Larry Haynes.

magical muncie four-speed | hotrod hotline

magical muncie four-speed | hotrod hotline

Transmissions are an essential part of hot rod builds. One of the most common swaps involves a Muncie 4-speed. These are easy to adapt to a wide range of hot rods. There are three basic types of Muncies: M20, M21 and M22.

A Muncie differs from a Saginaw transmission in that its reverse lever is in the tail housing, not the side cover. The difference between a Muncie and a Borg-Warner is the Muncies 7-bolt side cover (two less than Borg-Warner units).

Many Muncie main cases, tail housings and side covers have casting date codes. The code consists of two -in. circles divided in half. One is the date marker and the other the status marker. One side of the date marker has a month designator 1-12. The opposite side has up to five dots that indicate the week of the month. The status marker was used at the Muncie, IN plant to keep track of problems and is generally not important to enthusiasts. Hot rod builders are usually not too concerned with codes, but some units are pretty rare.

A serial number is stamped on all Muncie transmission cases. The code has nine symbols that will reveal the GM division, year, model, assembly plant and car the transmission was used in. The first symbol indicates division, the second matches the last digit of he model year and the third tells what assembly plant the car was built in. The last six digits are the last six digits of the cars VIN.

David W. West of Davids 4 Speeds LLC is a specialist who rebuilds Big 3 four-speed transmissions and who can help you identify what youve got. About 95 percent of Wests work involves Muncies. West says all Muncies work on the same basic principle: The input shaft goes to the cluster gear. The cluster is mated to the speed gears. The speed gears are independent of the main shaft.

The magic of the Muncie is in the synchro assemblies. The synchro hub is splined on the main shaft. The slider and the synchro ring grabbing on the cone of the gear allows the slider to engage the engagement teeth on the gears.

West tells people to think of a transmission in terms of levers. The lever is engine power. It creates leverage just like extending the length of a wrench. If you take a one-foot wrench and increase its length by two feet, it will break a tight bolt loose. The principle of a transmission is the same. With the leverage and the gears combined with a lever action, you increase the power an engine makes.

The Muncie M20 is basically a wide-ratio transmission and was intended for normal street driving use. The early ones had a 2.56:1 first gear. The later 1966-1974 units had a 2.52:1 first gear. They are compatible with a GM 3 Series differential. They are for economy and street drivability and just cruising.

The Muncie M21 is a close-ratio unit originally designed to be matched with 4.11:1 or 4.56:1 GM 4 Series differentials. Of course, rodders get a little creative. The M21 was for higher performance cars, which makes it a great box to use in a rod. A close-ratio gearbox keeps shift points closer together, which keeps rpms up. With a close-ratio box a driver can run through the gears and keep the engine in its power band so it performs in street racing or drag racing.

The M22 has higher-nickel-content gears of straight-cut design. It uses much the same gear ratios as the close-ratio M-21, but it can handle much more abuse. An M22 retains less heat due to the straight-cut gear design and the lack of thrust that helical-cut gears create. An M-22 holds up well. The downside is that it tends to make noise. It will rattle at low rpms and whine at higher rpms. The M22 is called the Rock Crusher. Dump the Rock Crusher, hot rodders say. People think all Muncie four-speeds are Rock Crushers, but theyre not.

Nowadays there are custom gear ratios and set ups, including M21 wide-ratio and M22 wide-ratio units. You can pretty much get what you want. Beefed up boxes for hot rods and Resto-Mods are popular, too.

When rebuilding a Muncie four-speed you can take a 65 case and put in later year parts. West bores the cluster pin and puts in a 1-nch pin. Then, he can put in a later synchro assembly and have the modern functionality with old looks.

Synthetic oils shouldnt be used in a Muncie. Synthetics are not synchro friendly. They are so slippery they dont allow synchro rings to grab on to the cone of the gear and synchronize properly. This will lead to grinding the gears. Synthetics also have a different consistency then a natural fluid. The early Muncie cases, especially, tend to be more porous so they dont hold up well with a synthetic. The synthetics leak out of them more easily than natural gear lubes.

GL5 fluid is another choice these days. It is said to be superceding GL4. GL5 has not been around as long enough to know how its going to unfold. West thinks GL5 has sulfur in it thats corrosive to brass. Like a synthetic, it doesnt allow synchro rings to grab the cones of the gears. So, stick to a GL4 for now

One of the main transmission issues is shifter problems. Grit that gets into the grease in the shifter mechanism can cause real problems. People also fail realize how important the shifter geometry is. A shifter handle has a specific bend to it.. Anything that impedes the shifters movement can keep a shifter from going in and going as far as it has to.

Muncie shifters have three selector plates coming out the bottom that have a unique bend and unique length that corresponds with the arm thats attached to the shift shaft. The rods are unique to each application. If you mix and match randomly, the length and shape of the bends will change and affect the shifting geometry. Having the proper geometry is a necessity. Often a hot rodder will say his transmission is grinding in fourth, but geometry is the problem.

auto gear super case m22z rock crusher 4-speed. perfect performance with 2.73 to 3.42 rear end gears. summer sale on now!!! - muncie 4 speed transmissions and rebuild kits

auto gear super case m22z rock crusher 4-speed. perfect performance with 2.73 to 3.42 rear end gears. summer sale on now!!! - muncie 4 speed transmissions and rebuild kits

STRONGEST Direct Replacement M22 With NEW Muncie AUTO GEAR SUPER CASE With The Strongest M22z ULTRAWIDE RATIO 4 SPEED TRANSMISSION. A GREAT HEAVY DUTY ROCKCRUSHER FOR YOUR CAMARO, NOVA, CHEVELLE, CORVETTE, GTO,442. THE MAIN CASE IS THE STRONGEST MADE with fill and drain plugs. C355 Forged Aluminum Mid-Plate. AG Roller Side Cover. SUPER TAIL HOUSING 27 or 32 spline (passenger side speedo) OUTPUT. COMPLETE PROFESSIONALLY BUILT MUNCIE. (ZERO MILES SINCE BUILT). WILL WORK IN ALL 63-74 GM CARS WITH 10 or 26 SPLINE CLUTCH DISK.

Special Z ratio (2.98-1st, 2.04-2nd,1.46-3rd, 1:1-4th) Perfect for your 2.73 to 3.42 gears. Excellent performance in 1st gear and low RPM on the highway. Forget the 5 or 6 speed and all the mods needed to install. The M22z will be a direct replacement for your original Muncie with no extra mods needed. And it is one of the strongest 4-speeds made so it will live behind big HP.

This M22Z trans was built for my 1970 Chevelle SS 402 bb stock configuration which had a frame off restoration 7 yrs ago. Changed from auto to manual. This made the Chevelle much more enjoyable to drive, a huge performance enhancement, gets the cam in the rpm sweet spot. Conversion looks identical to stock since most parts are all stock bolt-ons. You can use a lower numerical gear to bring the highway rpm down and still have better than stock ratio performance. The sound of the M22Z is awesome, just like the old days. Jeff is a great guy to deal with, many years of experience. Awesome packed in a wooden shipping crate. Best money I have spent on my Stock restored true SS Chevelle. Thanks Jeff

m22 rock crusher

m22 rock crusher

Muncie M22 "Rock Crusher 4 SPEEDS FROM 1965 TO 1974: This page is devoted to OEM Complete units; New aftermarket units and OEM parts and NOS parts. We have rebuild kits in stock and ready for shipment. Email us with your requirements and we will assist you in completing your M22 rebuild or providing you with a complete trans.Email us at [email protected] for availability, prices and questions. Muncie M22 REBUILD KITS: Quality parts from our inventory are assembled into kits for rebuilding M22 4 Speeds from 1965 to 1974. Kits are priced at $165.00 freight paid in US only.M22CK 1965-74 All YearsRebuild Kit includes the following items: Gasket Set; Shift Shaft Seals; Rear Tail Housing Seal and Bushing for both the 27 and 32 Spline Main Shafts; Syncronizer Keys and Springs; Syncro Rings; Input Bearing; Main Support Bearing; Countershaft; Small Parts Kit with Assorted Snap Rings, Thrust Washers, Needle Bearings and Taper Pin; Retainer Locking Straps, Oil Slinger and Input Cage and 17 needles. We have complete M22 aftermarket gear sets, both 10 and 26 spline Inputs and either Close (2.20 first gear) or Wide Ratio (2.52 first gear). The Wide Ratio M22 gear set is based on the 2.52 first gear ratio's and is available in both 10 and 26 spline Inputs. Contact us for suggestions of which set would best serve your application. This is an example of a OEM 1965-69 M22 4 Speed. It has 10 Splines on the Input (Clutch) Gear and 27 Splines on the mainshaft Output (yoke). For identification purposes all GM M22s have seven bolts attaching the Side Cover (inspection plate), no lines or rings on the Input Splines, have a drain plug in addition to the fill plug on the right side of the main case and from 1969 to 74 had a "C" designation at the end of the assembly date code. Call and check our inventory of rebuilt OEM GM M22 4 Speeds. We use original M22 Cases and M22 Gear Sets or rebuild them with our aftermarket M22 Gears when the original gears are too worn to be re-installed.Please Note - If you are having difficulty in locating someone in your area to service your M20, M21 and M22 4 speed whether it is complete rebuiding or attending to a particular problem, we can recommend a local re-builder to provide the necessary service.

Muncie M22 "Rock Crusher 4 SPEEDS FROM 1965 TO 1974: This page is devoted to OEM Complete units; New aftermarket units and OEM parts and NOS parts. We have rebuild kits in stock and ready for shipment. Email us with your requirements and we will assist you in completing your M22 rebuild or providing you with a complete trans.Email us at [email protected] for availability, prices and questions.

Muncie M22 REBUILD KITS: Quality parts from our inventory are assembled into kits for rebuilding M22 4 Speeds from 1965 to 1974. Kits are priced at $165.00 freight paid in US only.M22CK 1965-74 All YearsRebuild Kit includes the following items: Gasket Set; Shift Shaft Seals; Rear Tail Housing Seal and Bushing for both the 27 and 32 Spline Main Shafts; Syncronizer Keys and Springs; Syncro Rings; Input Bearing; Main Support Bearing; Countershaft; Small Parts Kit with Assorted Snap Rings, Thrust Washers, Needle Bearings and Taper Pin; Retainer Locking Straps, Oil Slinger and Input Cage and 17 needles.

We have complete M22 aftermarket gear sets, both 10 and 26 spline Inputs and either Close (2.20 first gear) or Wide Ratio (2.52 first gear). The Wide Ratio M22 gear set is based on the 2.52 first gear ratio's and is available in both 10 and 26 spline Inputs. Contact us for suggestions of which set would best serve your application.

This is an example of a OEM 1965-69 M22 4 Speed. It has 10 Splines on the Input (Clutch) Gear and 27 Splines on the mainshaft Output (yoke). For identification purposes all GM M22s have seven bolts attaching the Side Cover (inspection plate), no lines or rings on the Input Splines, have a drain plug in addition to the fill plug on the right side of the main case and from 1969 to 74 had a "C" designation at the end of the assembly date code.

Call and check our inventory of rebuilt OEM GM M22 4 Speeds. We use original M22 Cases and M22 Gear Sets or rebuild them with our aftermarket M22 Gears when the original gears are too worn to be re-installed.Please Note - If you are having difficulty in locating someone in your area to service your M20, M21 and M22 4 speed whether it is complete rebuiding or attending to a particular problem, we can recommend a local re-builder to provide the necessary service.

how to identify a m22 rock crusher | it still runs

how to identify a m22 rock crusher | it still runs

An M-22 "Rock Crusher" is a Muncie four-speed transmission for cars made by General Motors in the 1960s. Identify a transmission type correctly before fitting it into your car. If you have the incorrect transmission, your car may not function properly. You can identify several unique signs that identify an M-22 "Rock Crusher," even if it does not have a GM hallmark imprinted on its surface.

An M-22 "Rock Crusher" is a Muncie four-speed transmission for cars made by General Motors in the 1960s. Identify a transmission type correctly before fitting it into your car. If you have the incorrect transmission, your car may not function properly. You can identify several unique signs that identify an M-22 "Rock Crusher," even if it does not have a GM hallmark imprinted on its surface.

Check the casting number, the production year and the gear ratios on the aluminum serial number plate attached to the transmission box. Every GM Rock Crusher has a casting number with which you can easily identify a transmission box.

Count the input shaft teeth to find out the make of the transmission. Input shafts differ in each GM transmission, so you can easily identify an M-22 "Rock Crusher by its input shaft count. Each transmission has different numbers of teeth. An M-22 "Rock Crusher" always has 26 teeth.

Janos Gal has been writing since 2008. He wrote for the "Global Journalist" magazine in 2008 and for the "Estrella de Arica" daily in 2009. Gal has traveled extensively in Europe, South America and the United States. He holds a Bachelor of Arts, honors, in journalism from Edinburgh Napier University.

m-22 rock crusher 4-speed transmissions by jetboatbill

m-22 rock crusher 4-speed transmissions by jetboatbill

THIS IS THE M-22 TRANSMISSION THAT GM COULD NOT BUILD! Newly designed STATE-OF-THE-ART Muncie front case from "Auto Gear". This is by far the "BEST" replacement aluminum case ever built for a Muncie! The front bearing is a "SEALED" bearing, and slightly thicker than the original Muncie's, and tons STRONGER. Physically it is a PERFECT FIT replacement case. The gear set is made in Italy by a company that produces over 80 percent of all of the replacement gears available in the Automotive Industry today. Every part is NEW. Here are some of them, Syncro's, (brass blocker rings) "NEW" design Torque Lock Sliders, 1" Countershaft, dogs, needle bearings, Sealed front bearing, thrust washers, reverse shim, syncro springs, front bearing retainer, gaskets, THE complete rotating gear assembly, all 3 reverse gears, 32 spline mainshaft and the list goes on. The drain plugs are of new design too. The bottom one is magnetic, and they both have o-rings!

crusher reduction ratio

crusher reduction ratio

Ihave mentioned the fact that, as the %of voids in the crushing chamber decreases, the production of fines by attrition increases. This is likesaying that, as the Crusher Reduction Ratio in any given crusher is increased, the %of fines in the product will increase, even though the discharge setting remains unchanged. Both of these statements are true, but the degree to which the product is affected depends to a much greater extent upon the ratio-of-volume-reduction in the crusher chamber than it does upon the actual degree of reduction performed on the material. For a given ratio-of-reduction, the type of crusher with a flared crushing chamber will usually deliver a cleaner product than any of the older types; conversely, more reduction can be performed in the machine without creating excessive fines.

The facts outlined in the foregoing paragraph have an important bearing on crushing plant design. Commercial crushing plant operators are usually desirous of making as few fines as possible, and this is becoming increasingly important as the demand for small grades of screened material increases. To hold down the amount of dust on screenings in the combined plant product, it is essential that the amount of reduction per crushing stage be held within conservative limits; moreover, it is important that the work in each stage be apportioned with due regard to the characteristics of the crushers comprising these stages.

As an example, suppose that it is required to make a reduction of 7:1 in two stages of crushers, one a standard gyratory and the other a fine-reduction crusher. We know from our examination of the crushing characteristics of these types that, for equal reduction ratios, the volume-reduction-ratio in the standard gyratory is considerably higher than it is in the fine reduction crusher. Therefore, if minimum production of fines is desirable, it is logical that the heavy end of the 7:1 reduction should be handled in the latter machine. Generally, for such a case, the split would be about 3:1 to the standard machine, and 4:1 to the fine reduction crusher.

gm muncie 4-speed decoding : drivin' it home

gm muncie 4-speed decoding : drivin' it home

Proper identification of the transmission type is absolutely necessary, but sometimes difficult due to several factors. First, GM used several different methods to label and identify transmissions from year to year and model to model. Unfortunately the identification systems seem to have many exceptions, rendering them virtually useless to the restorer. In addition, due to engine and transmission swaps, and modifications that occur over the years many cars do not carry the original drivetrain that they were produced with.

For example, due to interchangeability, a 1969 Pontiac could have a trans case and gears from a Buick and a rear housing (extension) from an Oldsmobile. Several production changes through the years that effect the external appearance may also cause additional confusion when identifying a particular transmission: 1. Both single and dual drain plugs were used. 2. Speedometer adapters were used on either sides of the rear section (extension). 3. Side covers were sometimes secured with studs and nuts, other times with bolts. 4. Input shafts may be fine or coarse spline. Output shafts may be large or small. Combinations of these vary. 5. External shift levers are secured with studs and nuts, others with bolts. Some levers are long and some short. 6. Input shafts may have 1 ring, 2 rings, or no rings at all.

The main internal differences in the 3 types of transmissions are listed in the parts below. M-20 differs from M-21: Input shaft and Cluster gear M-20 & M-21 differ from M-22: Input shaft, Cluster gear, First, Second, Third, Reverse idler gear

All other components interchange, with the exception of production upgrades and changes. For example, 1963-65 synchronizers, blocking rings, etc. do not interchange with 1966 and newer versions, and therefore the transmission must be stock or interchanged as a unit.

muncie m22 4 speed rock crusher auto gear - $1950 (wrightsville) | auto parts sale | york, pa | shoppok

muncie m22 4 speed rock crusher auto gear - $1950 (wrightsville) | auto parts sale | york, pa | shoppok

M22 Muncie 4 Speed Rock Crusher Auto Gear all NEW but the Side cover 388468 with 9 pound spring call price is firmWe have NEW 11" Clutch KIT $160.00 in Stock ...

SELLING MUNCIE M22 TRANSMISSION 2.20 FIRST GEAR RATIO 10 SPLINE IN 27 SPLINE OUT... I BUILT TRANSMISSION FOR MYSELF USING THE BEST PARTS I COLLECTED UP OVER THE YEARS '''''NO JUNK '''''''THIS TRANS IS A REAL M22..COMPLETE REBUILD .SLIDERS....PIN...FRONT RETAINER....FORKS....BEARINGS.... SYNCHR ...

I have for sale several muncie 4 speed transmissions. I have M20 wide ratio, M21 close ratio and M22 transmissions. Prices are as follows. Casting # 3851325. no damage but may need freshened up. 700.00. 3851325. nice rebuilt transmission. 1000.00. 3885010. nice condition. 900.00. 3885010. Nice rebui ...

This is a very rare 660 m22 rock crusher muncie, it is a service replacement transmission unstamped, no vin, it will be correct for 68 to 70, all rebuilt and guaranteed, all new straight cut gears, 220 ratio, asking 2475. Also have a 69 m20 for 1100. And a 311 Saginaw trans 550. Call ...

This is a super nice m22 rock crusher trans, it all rebuilt and guaranteed, has all new gears in it, the case has been bushed also. It is the close ratio trans, it a very early 66 trans, asking 1900. Call dave call dave 352two16227three ...

This is a super nice m22 rock crusher trans, it all rebuilt and guaranteed, has all new gears in it, the case has been bushed also. It is the close ratio trans, it a very early 66 trans, asking 1900. Call dave call dave 352two16227three ...

inside the n-series m23 transmission from auto gear engineering

inside the n-series m23 transmission from auto gear engineering

Once upon a time, manual transmissions were standard in virtually every American passenger car. Rowing through the gears of a "standard shift" transmission was a way of life. Every man, woman, and child who aspired to venture onto the open byways had to learn the art of synchronizing their left foot and right arm.

Today manual transmissions are standard equipment in entry-level compact models, but most buyers opt for an automatic. For most midsize and full-size cars as well as in the gamut of crossovers, SUVs and light-duty trucks, an automatic is the only choice. It's a different scenario entirely in the vintage car hobby. Nothing seemingly replaces the novelty of driving a muscle car equipped with a floor-shifted manual transmission, and its allure is a feature that nostalgic buyers are willing to pay a premium for.

GM's Muncie-built four-speed may be the most well-known manual transmission ever produced. First released in 1963, the platform remains strongly supported nearly 60 years later. The Syracuse M23 from Auto Gear Equipment (or AGE) in Syracuse, New York is one company that has expanded on GM's original design to develop an entirely new gearbox that's as durable as it is functional, and ideal for cruisers, drag racers, and road racers alike.

Warner Gear was established in the early 1900s. The company has a longstanding history developing and producing manual transmissions. Its T85 three-speed was originally developed for the 1934 Chrysler Airflow. It was then picked up by other automakers in subsequent years, including General Motors.

Since its introduction in 1953, Chevrolet's Corvette had been equipped with Powerglide automatic only. The marque's new-for-1955 V-8 seemed a natural fit for its sports car and Chevrolet engineer and Corvette ambassador Zora Duntov sought to complement it with a manual transmission. Using GM's existing Muncie-built SM318 three-speed manual found in Chevrolet's passenger cars, Duntov developed a Corvette-specific variant containing 2.20:1 First, 1.32:1 Second, and 1:1 Third gear ratios.

Four-speed manual transmissions were popular in European sports cars at the time. When compared to a three-speed, the four-speed increased operational flexibility with the Europeans' small-displacement engineswhether upshifting or downshifting. Duntov felt a four-speed manual would help legitimize the Corvette as a world class competitor. Instead of purchasing costly European gearboxes or engineering an entirely new transmission for it, however, GM expanded upon the basic design of Warner's proven T85.

Chevrolet's engineering team incorporated a fourth forward gear into the T85 by relocating its Reverse gear from the main case to the extension housing. The gear spacing specifically developed for the Corvette's Muncie three-speed was retained for the four-speed. The existing 1.32:1 gear was pushed to Third, however, and a new 1.66:1 gear became Second. Full synchronization in all forward gears was also added, and the American close-ratio four-speed was born.

General Motors patented the four-speed manual transmission and Warner Gear was contracted to produce it. Designated "T10" by Warner, the new four-speed debuted in late-year 1957 as an extra cost option on the Corvette carrying Regular Production Option (or RPO) 685. Production records indicate that less than 700 were installed that model year. T10's availability expanded to other GM brands in the years that followed and ultimately to other makes. GM revised its RPO designation system to include alphanumeric characters for 1963 and RPO 685 was re-designated M20.

As the world's largest automaker with nearly 60 percent of the new-car market during the early '60sand one that prided itself in vertical integrationGM reevaluated outsourcing four-speed production to Warner. Not only was the horsepower race taxing the T10's reliability, the overall popularity of four-speeds in general had reached a point that GM determined it was more profitable to produce its own gearbox.

The Chevrolet-Muncie plant in Muncie, Indiana had been building manual transmissions for GM's passenger cars and light-duty trucks for years. GM chose that facility to produce its new four-speed, which its engineers developed as an outgrowth of the patented design that ultimately became the T10. The redesigned transmission featured a host of internal enhancements aimed at boosting durability and fitted it with a cast-aluminum main case, bearing support, and extension housing to reduce weight.

The new Muncie-built four-speed began reaching Chevrolet's vehicle assembly plants during the '63 model year. Gearing included a wide-ratio unit (2.56:1 First that later became 2.52:1.) that carried RPO M20 and a close-ratio unit (with 2.20:1 First) that carried RPO M21. By the mid '60s, availability expanded to most GM marques. Not long after, RPO M22 was released as a heavy-duty, close-ratio version (2.20:1 First) with a revised helix angle to improve durability.

Insurance surcharges and the early '70s gas crunch took its toll on the muscle car segment. Demand for four-speeds had fallen so significantly that GM deemed that it unfeasible to produce its Muncie-built units any longer. By midyear 1973 the M20, M21, and M22 were eliminated from Chevrolet-Muncie production schedule and GM began outsourcing Warner's second-design Super T10 as its performance four-speed. That practice continued well into the '80s.

Despite consumer emphasis toward automatic transmissions in the new car segment, manual transmissions remain quite popular with hobbyists that own and drive vintage performance vehicles. Modern five- and six-speeds are attractive choices for their overdriven gearing and ability to tolerate higher power levels when compared to production four-speeds. There are, however, drawbacks, and those can include high initial cost, limited gear selections, and customized installation.

Traditional four-speeds remain extremely popular. They're generally reasonably priced, packaged compactly for easy vehicle installation, and continue to be well-supported on the aftermarket by OE suppliers. Auto Gear Equipment (or AGE) has remained vigilant in its quest to improve upon GM's excellent design. Its George Sollish has spent his career providing hobbyist with the best operating Muncie-built M20, M21, and M22 transmissions on the market.

Sollish has even taken four-speed development a step further. AGE's proprietary M23 Syracuse-built gearbox boasts a number of technological enhancements aimed at greatly improving performance and durability in a variety of operating conditions. While AGE's M23 is a direct bolt-in wherever a Muncie-built four-speed originally resided, it will easy install wherever a Warner Gear or Saginaw gearbox was. And because the M23's external characteristics lend a sleek, 21st century look, the outward appearance no longer polarizes its appeal to the GM-only crowd. Its rather universal design makes the M23 an acceptable solution for virtually any make and/or model where an extremely durable four-speed made using only the highest quality components while selling at a reasonable price is desired.

HRM sat down with George Sollish to not only gain a better understanding of AGE's general support for Muncie-built four-speeds, but to truly understand what its new Syracuse-built M23 is all about. Here's what he had to say.

GS: New Process Gear has been building manual transmission in Syracuse, New York since 1888. My grandfather, Irving H. Sollish began selling aftermarket components for New Process Gear during the mid '20s. After WWII New Process decided to exit the aftermarket, he was offered the opportunity to buy his department. He did so and founded Auto Gear Company in mid-1945.

From the beginning, we sold original equipment service transmission and axle parts manufactured by New Process. I started with the company in 1972. We started designing gearboxes for off-highway equipment in 1982, and high-performance automotive gearboxes in 2001. Today, most of our business comes from the high-performance automotive segmentour "Syracuse" four-speeds and "Muncie" service parts.

GS: General Motors "Muncie" four-speed is an improved Warner Gear T10. Of all the classic muscle car four-speeds, only the Muncie has "stretch"or the ability to evolve with changing requirements. It's still a vital development platform today, eighty years after the basic gear specifications were written. That is engineering of a very high order, and we are proud to add our footnote to its history.

GS: We support the Warner Gear T5 and T56, the Tremec TKO, and TR6060 with original equipment parts and, of course the Muncie four-speed. We saw that Muncie four-speeds were being discarded for lack of reliable, quality parts. The first component we designed was our SuperCase, because the original case was always the weakest link. We knew we could only build a better gearbox if we built a better case. It went into production during mid-2001. After that, it became clear that by adding a few more items we could offer completely new transmissions. So we did.

GS: We don't provide comprehensive support for the '63 models, which have a smaller front bearing and no sleeve under the main shaft first gear. There were few of these built and very few survive today. For everything else, with some exceptions, we provide parts and service.

GS: Our overhaul kits include the main drive nut, main drive bearing, main shaft pilot bearing, main shaft bearing, main shaft bushing, main shaft oil seal, four synchronizer rings, two synchronizer strut/spring kits, a small parts kit with loose rollers, spacers, snap rings and thrust washers, three shift shaft oil seals, a gasket set, and speedometer O-ring. The price depends upon the application, but it's usually between $125 and $140.

GS: It depends upon the level of performance, and where steel, tariffs, and the exchange rate are, but currently an M20 is $1,910, an M22 is $2,070. Those are without shipping, from Syracuse, New York. Assembled gearboxes include a wooden crate and typically ship for $100 and $120 within the lower 48 states. We also offer 'knocked down' units at a reduced price for those that wish to assemble their own.

GS: GM's case was always the weakest link in the design, even in the last versions.Old drag racers swapped their "Muncie" for a T10 when they tired of dropping the bottom out of theirGM box at the start line. There were also the broken ears and leaking countershafts.Then there was the narrow main drive bearing, left over from what must have been a misguided cost saving change.We set out to address all these issues.

The SuperCase has a thicker front wall supporting a full-width sealed 307 bearing, thicker mounting ears, and a countershaft sealing soft plug standard.We also gave it O-ringed fill and drain plugs for positive sealing, and cast it from stronger 356-T6 aluminum. We produce versions to support '64-65 applications with a 7/8-inch diameter countershaft, and '66-74 1-inch diameter countershaft applications with either a front thrust washer or a front thrust button. The latter spreads the separating load over a 1.5-inch footprint and solves the "tunneling" problem that causes leaks in the original. For it we developed our "anchored" countershaft.

GS: We have the advantage of modern low volume manufacture and a very close working relationship with our Italian partners, a relationship over thirty years old. All our gears are "service" quality, made with CNC equipment from today's cleaner steels and with more consistent heat treatment. And they are all made to, and inspected against, Auto Gear prints.

Synchronizers are, without question, the most complex and most technically demanding components in any manual transmission. At AGE synchronizer engineering is central to our success. This is one area where the gap between us and our competition is most obviousour synchronizers must perform in our gearboxes. Tooth geometry, cone angles, material, hub and strut design, and plug-quenching of the sliding clutch are all essential.

GS: Because SAE steels are not available outside North America in less than mill-run lots, most of our gears are cut from the German 'DIN' equivalent of SAE 8620. Where advantageous, we use the DIN equivalent of SAE 9310. We do not use SAE 9310 equivalent steel everywhere due to its much higher cost and manufacturing limitations, and the possibility of substitution errors in assembly. Other methods we use to increase gear capacity are through pitch, helix angle and pressure angle selection, crowning of the teeth, and shot peening. We use all of these as suggested by the application requirements.

GS: We duplicate the M20 and M21 gearset, and the M22 "Rock Crusher" in three ratios (2.20:1, 2.56:1 and 2.98:1 First gears). For our "severe duty" M23 we have 36 gearsets, 12 each on 2.20:1, 2.57:1 and 2.99:1 First gears. There's a chart on our website.

GS: Almost every part has been reviewed, redrawn, and improved for strength, performance, or efficient low-volume production. Several years ago, with ever-more-powerful engines appearing every year, we realized that making tiny improvements to GM's four-speed would no longer keep pace with our customer's changing requirements. That was when we embarked upon the N-series, which is our current production platform, and began marketing our gearboxes as "Syracuse" four speeds.

GS: General Motors designed its Muncie-built four-speed for street use.Where competition use was contemplated, the sport was road racing.For neither is first gear strength or durability a critical concern, so the strongest gear is actually second. In today's marketplace, a significant percentage of our customers are at the drag strip. They need a stronger first gear, and the M23 project was started to supply one.

GS: When the M23 program began, we intended to add only a stronger first gear, and only in ratios suited for drag racing.New was only a plain bearing (sleeve-supported) first gear with a coarser pitch, flatter helix angle, and 20-degree pressure angle, and the necessary mating countershaft and reverse idler drive gear.The following year, under pressure from customers who heard there was something stronger than an M22, we extended the line with street and road racing ratios, and an M23-specific version of our roller bearing first.More recently we upgraded the countershaft to SAE 9310 steel and further extended the ratios available (to today's 36 gearsets).

The N-series M23 is our active development platform and therefore represents a moving target. As we find opportunities to build a better gearbox, where possible, the M23 is upgraded.Currently, for example, there is a new, stronger case ready for release. It will add a rear thrust button, countershaft float control, and offer a Ford mounting pattern.

Features of the N-series M23 currently include a front thrust button case, a stronger involute-spline main shaft with lashless press-fit synchronizer hubs, a straight cut reverse sliding gear, hard anodized aluminum main drive retainer, bronze-bushed shift cover with oversize 'handcuffed' towers and a longer interlock support pin, lightweight sliding clutches, investment cast steel shift forks, stronger aluminum bearing support, chemical gaskets throughout, roller-supported first gear (plain bearing optional), countershaft unit cage bearings (loose rollers optional), super-polished main shaft, helical gears, sliding clutches and shift forks, O-ringed fill and drain plugs, and, for oil-sealed main drives, and extension-mounted vent.

GS: It is our policy to build and deliver the best gearbox we can at any given time and, therefore, we do not offer a "stripped" M23.Customers can, however, specify a number of "no additional cost" options when ordering such as input or output splines, speedometer circle gear, with or without roller first. Extra cost options are limited currently to shift modifications"slick shifting" (18 spline sliding clutches and destination gears, no synchronizer rings) or "semi-slick shifting" (18 spline sliding clutches and destination gears, with synchronizer rings).

GS: The new N-series case is a complete redesign.The N-series case is heavily ribbed aluminum, roughly equivalent to an un-ribbed aluminum case that's 3/4-inch thick, and about three pounds heavier than our SuperCase.It doesn't look like a GM case and, to the satisfaction of potential Ford customers, also supports Ford clutch housings. For those who like the current SuperCase, it will remain in production for direct sale and as a build option on our complete gearboxes.

GS: The SuperCase (with main drive bearing, gasket set, countershaft soft plug, and fill and drain plugs) sells for about $245, shipped from Syracuse.The new N-series case is not available separately.We have a persistent problem with gearboxes represented as Auto Gear units where the externals are ours while the guts are anything but.One of the reasons for the new case was to assure customers that they are buying and using genuine Auto Gear products.

GS: We do not rate our gearboxes, as every application varies. It's important to understand that a transmission transmits power, whereas an engine produces it. The first has a subjective ratingthe amount of power it will transmit in your car for a certain number of hourswhile the power output of the second can be objectively measured. The ratings, for example, that Warner published for the T10 were based on the power output of the Ford, GM or Chrysler engines they were willing to couple with it.

That said, our mission is to build the strongest manual transmissions available for streetable applications. This puts a target on our back, and our customers aren't shy about challenging us. We have a sayingwe'd rather you're mad because we didn't sell you, than mad because we did. We prefer to walk away from applications that we know our gearbox won't work in. We look at it is if we run an orphanageyou don't get one of our gearboxes unless you'll provide it a good home.

GS: We build each gearbox to order and, as we attract the more demanding applications, most of our customers order the M23 severe duty specification. On the M23 platform we offer 36 gearset options which allows us to meet the ratio demands of land speed, drag, road race, circle track, hill climb, and high-end street cars with different mechanical specifications and power curves. We offer the number of ratios we do because one or two do not fit all. Once the ratios are selected in consultation with our Application Wizard, Nathan Huxtable, we complete the specification, selecting the synchronizer design, the input and output spline geometry and whether to install our roller first gear or super polishing.

GS: In a word, steady.As muscle car enthusiasts age out, we have been able to extend our reach into racing, which is still mostly a four-speed game no matter how many gears are in the box.We also see that, as dual clutch paddle-shifted computer-controlled designs replace H-pattern manually shifted gearboxes in Corvettes and elsewhere, there remains a small core of well-heeled drivers who believe that the coordination of hand, eye and foot are one of the pleasures of driving.To some degree, these are who we do it for.

the 1965 chevrolet m22 rockcrusher transmission: the mystical transmission

the 1965 chevrolet m22 rockcrusher transmission: the mystical transmission

Although all previously published data has denied or excluded the existence of the 1965 M22 transmission, this author has uncovered the trail behind this mystical transmission. The complete history of M22 prototypes is covered in Volume 2 of the book series Chevrolet by the Numbers but what is covered here is the proof of the 1965 M22 and how it came to be installed in 1965 Corvettes and passenger cars.

I had heard rumors for many years that Chevrolet had produced a special run of 1965 M22 transmissions, but I could never find any proof to substantiate the claim. Many Corvette (NCRS) officials still refuse to discuss the possibility that this transmission was installed in 1965 Corvettes. I believe that with the documentation presented here, there should be no doubt left in anyones mind that this series of events took place.

During the Grand Sport Corvette Race Program, Chevrolet instituted a field test using the M22 transmission. This field test was successful and specific design changes were made to the existing Muncie transmission platform to bring M22 production units into existence. A Chevrolet Engineering Change Recommendation #68715 was issued on December 19, 1964, that proposed the changes required to change the M20-21 into the M22 rockcrusher transmission. This ECR is referred to several times through the 1965 Corvette A.I.M. (Assembly Instruction Manual) withthe date stated on the A.I.M. sheets as April 23, 1965. This same ECR states that the M22 is to be used with Corvette options RPO L76, L84, and L78 for 1965. This transmission was also released for the 1965 passenger car with the L78 engine. One thing that must be kept in mind here is that this document does not prove that any M22 transmissions made it to production vehicles.

During my research on Muncie transmissions, I gained clearance to visit the Muncie assembly plant in Muncie, Indiana. Many of the original key employees have now retired. I looked for originaldocuments at the plant for several days. After failing to turn up anything in their basic files room, I was taken to a dingy upstairs room above the plant, which was padlocked and surrounded by a woven wire fence (Similar to the Chevrolet Central Office Records Retention Area in Introduction.) In this room, I proceeded to find the build records, shipping records, transmission code sheets, and transmission build sheets for all Muncie transmissions for almost twenty years. Little did I realize that at that time I had found the proof needed to validate the 1965 M22 transmission.

The first substantial piece of documentation I found concerning the 1965 M22 transmission was the complete breakdown sheet for all M22 transmissions from 1965 through 1974. This sheet lists by model year, each M22 assembly shipped from Muncie with accumulative totals across the bottom of the page. Across the top of the page are the words First Build 4/15/65 1st Shipment 4/19/65, recap of M22 (Rock Crusher) Trans. By comparing these M22 transmission assemblies to Chevrolets 1965 transmission identification codes, I found a perfect match. This transmission identification code list was issued by the Chevrolet Facilities and Product Planning Department Planning Section. This code list listed the model code, RPO (regular production option), specific transmission type, gear ratio, transmission part number, and transmission letter code designation. At the bottom of the transmission codes page, there are notations dated March 25, 1965 that these same transmissions were added to the codes list. This document is stamped Received March 31, 1965 Chevrolet Material Department. Muncie. Since the complete breakdown sheet only gives the total M22 units built, I then had to refer to the accumulative shipments lists which would give me a breakdown of the total units. On this shipment list, there are several columns which show assembly plants, GM of Canada, McKinnon Industries, Oldsmobile, Pontiac, Service and SS Automobiles. By referring to this sheet I could tell which transmissions were built and where they were sent. From the comparison of these three documents, I have deducted the following breakdown of 1965 M22 transmissions which were installed in production in assembly line vehicles.

At this time during my research, I realized that even though all of this documentation was great, I needed a legitimate car to verify that these transmissions had actually made it to a factory assembly line. I contacted an old friend of mine, Darrell Sheppard, (of 4-Speeds by Darrell fame) who had helped quite a bit with the book project already. Just by chance, he had just been contacted by someone who said he had a 1965 M22 transmission and was looking for specific information pertaining to the possibility that Muncie built these transmissions. Darrell gave me the name of this gentleman and I gave him a call. He proceeded to tell me that the car he had just bought a car which had an extensive race history and he had complete documentation as to how the car was ordered, shipped and delivered. Since this car was a Canadian shipped car, he also had the shipping records from Chevrolet of Canada. He immediately sent some snapshots to me of the transmission which started several months of letters and phone calls. He also later supplied me with more detailed photographs of the transmission.

There are several interesting features which are special in the 1965 M22. All 1963-65 M20 and M21 transmission used a 7/8 countergear pin in all assemblies. During prototype testing, this 7/8 countergear pin was found to be the weak link in upgrading the Muncie transmission. This upgrade was mandatory due to the advent of newer and more powerful engines that were to be introduced to the Chevrolet engine lineup for the next several model years. Although other sources have stated that the upgrade to a new 1 countershaft pin bore started with the 1966 model year, it actually began in the 1965 M22 transmission.

Another change for the M22 was the new low helical-angle cut gear set which increased the inner strength of the transmission dramatically. This gearset was quite noisy and from all indications was called the Rockcrusher transmission from the beginning by all Chevrolet and Muncie engineering staff. The 1965 M22 maintained the 10-spline input and 27-spline output as all other Muncie transmissions from that model year.The 1965 M22 also had the drain plug boss drilled and tapped for a magnetic drain plug. This was not done on the M20 or M21 transmissions.

There are several features on this specific M22 transmission which should be mentioned here. The primary feature which seems odd is that the casting number on the main transmission case has been routered off. This was done intentionally to these transmissions to take off the original casting number. The 1964-65 Muncie transmission main case casting number was #3851325. It was designed for the use of the 7/8 countergear pin inside the transmission assembly. To manufacture the M22, the #3851325 case had to be drilled out to 1 to accept the special countershaft pin. A new maincase was not to be released until the start of the 1966 model year. Since the Muncie transmission plant did most of their own prototype work, they had a specialassembly line set up in which all prototype transmissions were run. If there were any changes made to the maincase, all original casting numbers were routered off the maincase so all internal personnel would realize that the case had been altered in some way. Since there were only 57 M22 transmissions built in 1965, the cases were routered off just like a typical protype. The primary reason the M22 transmissions went down this line was because internally they were regarded as limited-production assemblies with a modified or altered maincase. The M22 continued to use the same tailhousing, side cover and front bearing retainer as all other Muncie transmissions.

The final aspect of this transmission which solidifies this information is the fact that this transmission had to be built on or after April 15, 1965, due to the original M22 breakdown sheet which has the words First build 4-15-65 1st Shipment 4-19-65 at the top. When I originally contacted the owner of this car, I did not mention the date at the top of this page. It was quite a revelation when I received the photographs that you see pictured here, and the date matched exactly to the breakdown sheet. Also, the correct VIN was stamped into the maincase whichmatched all the paperwork to be mentioned later.

Since this particular Corvette has played such an important part in this research, I believe that the documented history of this car deserves mentioning here. This 1965 Corvette was ordered by David G. Billes of Willow Dale, Ontario, Canada on March 22, 1965, from Gorries Chevrolet/Oldsmobile in Toronto. Mr. Billes owned Canadian Tire, a huge auto parts and hardware chain throughout Canada. The car was ordered specifically for racing purposes and, as you can see from the original order form, was equipped with the 396/425 HP engine, transistor ignition, F40 suspension and the very rare N03 36 gallon fuel tank. In the special instructions box under accessories, please note that this was a rush-competition car from day one. Also note that the car was ordered black with black trim in the top right box. The car was raced competitively during the 1965 racing season including the Canadian Grand Prix, at Mosport Park in Canada.

The next piece of documentation was the factory car order which was sent to Gorries Chevrolet to state how the car was to be built and that it was now awaiting production. On this document the 4 speed transmission option code listed the transmission as an M20. In 1965, all 4 speeds were ordered initially by the M20 4 speed designation. Depending upon the rear axle ratio, Chevrolet supplied either the M20 wide ratio or M21 close ratio transmission at their discretion. It has not been determined at this point of documentation which transmission will be supplied to the car at final assembly. Also the carwas assigned the factory car order number of #913211. This number is used to designate this particular car, the options assigned to it, and the schedule to build the car.

Also included from the owner was the photocopy of the Chevrolet Canadian build shipping record sheet. This sheet discloses date shipped, shipping control number, model type, vehicle identification, arrival date, trim, paint, and dealer number in columns, moving left to right. This particular Corvettes entry is the second from the last on the page. It shows shipping date of 6/17 and a factory control number of #913211 which matches the factory car order. The model is listed as 19437 (Corvette Coupe) as well as the VIN #S118966. This is the first time the VIN number is listed. This VIN number is stamped into the transmission case. The next column is the 6/17 arrival date, the next column was left blank because the car was receiving the standard black interior. The next column is the AA black paint code with the final column designating the 5526 dealer number which was Gorries Chevrolet. The actual body build date of the car is June 2, 1965. Please note that this car was to be delivered June 17. The order date was March 22, 1965. This car took 86 days to build on a rush order. It is believed that this car was late due to the fact that it was a N03 car and many of these cars were built and overseen by Zora Argus Duntov at the General Motors Tech Center.

The final piece of documentation regarding this car is the original salesmans copy of the delivery transaction. This sheet clearly shows the VIN #5S118966, the factory car order #913211, and all of the options which were installed in the car. The transmission designation is now M22, designating that this car was final assembled with the aforementioned transmission. There is one mistake on this sheet in that the color of the car is listed as blue. The car was delivered black and the original trim tag reflects this as well.

As I said before, I believe that the information presented here clearly substantiates the existence and building of the 1965 M22. I have given many specific details to these transmissions which could possibly be used to create a new flurry of 1965 M22 equipped cars. I want to warn anyone who might consider this fraudulent act: I have purposefully omitted some details relating to the 1965 M22 for this very reason. I also have the original Muncie shipping records which designate which transmissions were shipped and when they were shipped. It would be foolish at this point to try to counterfeit a similar transmission without the final pieces to the puzzle. If you happen to have a legitimate M22 car or transmission, please contact me at [email protected]

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