coal resources, production and use in the russian federation - sciencedirect

coal resources, production and use in the russian federation - sciencedirect

While energy and fuel consumption is mainly based on natural gas, coal is still the third largest component of the fuel and energy of the Russian economy. The coal industry has the most secure base in the country as Russia takes the second place in the world in coal resources and reserves. This paper provides an overview of Russian coal reserves, main deposits, basins, and trends in coal production in the last decades. The current situation in the coal market, including the tendencies in domestic coal use and coal export, is described. Main applications of coal processing in Russia, such as power generation, coke production and coal cleaning, and prospective directions for the development of Russias coal industry, are also discussed.

innovative processing and hydrometallurgical treatment methods for complex antimony ores and concentrates. part ii: hydrometallurgy of complex antimony ores | springerlink

innovative processing and hydrometallurgical treatment methods for complex antimony ores and concentrates. part ii: hydrometallurgy of complex antimony ores | springerlink

The article presents results of hydrometallurgical and bio-treatment of antimony ores and recommend new dissolvents for antimony sulfides. The authors introduce a processing plant which is a single operating processor of antimonic gold-bearing alloys with the successful electrolytic refining of anodes and production of cathode antimony and noble metal slurry in Russian Federation.

P. M. Solozhenkin and E. V. Bondarenko, Extraction of antimony trioxide from gold-antimony concentrates by new solutioners, in: Proceedings of the 8th Conference on Environment and Mineral Processing, VSB-TU Ostrava (2004).

P. M. Solozhenkin, Compound antimony ore processing technology in China, in: Base Metals Ores Processing. Survey Information [in Russian], Issue I, TsNIITsvetment Economics and Information, Moscow (1992).

P. M. Solozhenkin, V. P. Nebera, and I. G. Abdulmanov, The technology of direct processing of antimony-bearing materials for obtaining of antimony compounds, in: Proceedings of the 20th IMPC, Aachen (1997).

P. M. Solozhenkin, Advance in beneficiation and processing of gold-antimony ores and concentrates in permafrost area of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia), in: The 21st Century Bulletin. Mining and Metallurgical Section: Mineral Exploration, Exploitation and Processing. Collected Works Toward the 15th Anniversary of the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences [in Russian], Moscow (2005).

P. M. Solozhenkin, Gold-antimony ores and concentrates dressing and treatment, in: Advanced Integrated Processing Technologies for Mineral Raw Materials [in Russian], V. A. Chanturia (Ed.), Ruda Metally Publishing House, Moscow (2008).

EP 0 806 487A1 C22 B30/02, C25 C1/22, Extraction of antimony from sulfide ores by alkaline leaching, recovery of elemental sulfur and electrowinning antimony from fluoborate solution, Bulletin 1997/46, Olper, Marco (1997).

P. M. Solozhenkin, Technology for the processing of antimony and gold bearing alloys for the gold base metal alloy and antimony production, in: Proceedings of the 37th International October Conference on Mining and Metallurgy, Bor Lake, Serbia and Montenegro (2005).

E. P. Zhirkov, P. M. Solozhenkin, and G. I. Baltukhaev, Multipurpose use of gold-antimony ores and concentrates, in: Modern Problems in Integrated Processing of Natural and Human and Industry-Generated Materials. International Conference Proceedings (Plaksins Readings) [in Russian], Alteks, Saint-Petersburg (2005).

V. P. Nebera, P. M. Solozhenkin, and N. N. Lyalikova-Medvedeva, Biomodification of mineral surfaces in mineral processing and hydrometallurgy, in: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Mining, Petroleum and Metallurgical Engineering (MPM7-Assiut), Egypt (2001).

P. M. Solozhenkin, V. P. Nebera, and I. G. Abdulmanov, Sulfate- reducing bacteria in mineral processing and hydrometallurgy, in: Innovations in Mineral and Coal Processing. Proceedings of the 7th International Mineral Processing Symposium, Suna Atak, Guven Onal, Mehmet Sabri Celik A.A. (Eds.), Balkema/Rotterdam/ Brookfield (1998).

A. V. Kazdobin, P. M. Solozhenkin, T. V. Bashlykova, and A. B. Zhivaya, Biotechnology in processing of antimony ores and gold-antimony concentrates, in: Modern Assessment of Processing Behavior of Rebellious and Non-Conventional Minerals, Noble Metals, and Diamonds, and the Advanced Processing Techniques. International Conference Proceedings (Plaksins Readings) [in Russian], Alteks, Moscow (2004).

P. M. Solozhenkin and E. V. Bondarenko, Hydrometallurgical treatment of compound antimony concentrates and antimony-based pigments production, in: Chemical Science and Processing of Mineral Complexes, and Material Synthesis. Proceedings of the Russian Science and Technology Conference in Partnership with Foreign Sciences [in Russian], Kola Scientific Center, Apatity (2008).

E. V. Bondarenko and P. M. Solozhenkin, Prospects of agitation and heap leaching of complex antimony ores, in: Proceedings of the 4th Congress of Preparators in the Commonwealth of Independent States Countries [in Russian], Alteks, Moscow (2007).

P. M. Solozhenkin and E. V. Bondarenko, Integrated utilization of antimony ores in Transbaikalia area. Priorities and features of the Baikal Region development, in: Proceedings of the 3rd International Scientific-and-Practical Conference Dedicated to the Year of Planet Earth and to the 85th Anniversary of the Republic of Buryatia [in Russian], BNTs SO RAN, Ulan-Ude (2008).

Solozhenkin, P.M., Alekseev, A.N. Innovative Processing and Hydrometallurgical Treatment Methods for Complex Antimony Ores and Concentrates. Part II: Hydrometallurgy of Complex Antimony Ores. J Min Sci 46, 446452 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10913-010-0056-z

biotechnology of concentrate and antimony ore processing | springerlink

biotechnology of concentrate and antimony ore processing | springerlink

The results are presented for using microorganisms for mercury and antimony separation and extraction of oxidized antimony minerals. The problems on technology of direct processing of gold-antimony concentrates by pentachlorous antimony chlorides are considered. The perspective is shown for leaching antimony by alkaline solution of sulfate-reducing bacteria. The transformation of antimony sulfide into commodity concentrate of antimony trioxide by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans is demonstrated.

E. A. Kozlovskii, Mineral and Raw Material Problems in Russia on the Eve of XXI Century (State and Prediction). Antimony [in Russian], Russk. Biogr. Institute and Izd. Mosk. Gos. Gorn. Universitet, Moscow (1999).

P. M. Solozhenkin, S. V. Usova, T. N. Aknazarova, and R. R. Fazylova, Technology of direct processing of antimony ends for producing of pigments on the basis of antimony, Tzvet. Metally, No. 1 (1994).

P. M. Solozhenkin, V. P. Nebera, and I. G. Abdulmanov, The technology of direct processing of antimony-bearing materials for obtaining of antimony compounds, in: Proceedings of the XX IMPC, 4, Aachen (1997).

P. M. Solozhenkin, V. P. Nebera, and I. G. Abdulmanov, Sulfate-reducing bacteria in mineral processing and hydrometallurgy. Innovations in mineral and coal processing, in: Proceedings of the 7th International Symposium on Mineral Processing, Suna Atak, Guven Onal, and Mehmet Sabri Celik A. A. (eds.), Balkema, Rotterdam, Brookfield (1998).

P. M. Solozhenkin and V. P. Nebera, Microorganisms and flotation environment and innovation in mining and mineral technology, in: Proceeding of the IV International Conference on Clean Technologies for the Mining Industry, M. A. Sanchez, F. Vergaraand, and S. H. Castro (eds.), 1, University of Concepcion, Chile (1998).

N. N. Lyalikova and L. L. Lyubavina, On the Possibility of Using a Culture of Thiobacillus Ferrooxidans to Separate Antimony and Mercury Sulfides during Flotation. Fundamentals and Biohydrometallurgy, R. W. Lawrence, R. M. R. Branion, and H. B. Ebner (eds.), Elsevier, New York (1986).

V. V. Lodeishchikov, State of Investigations and Practical Developments in the Field of Biohydrometallurgical Processing of Rebellious Gold-Bearing Ores and Concentrates: Review [in Russian], Irgiredmet, Irkutsk (1993).

V. V. Lodeishchikov, A. F. Panchenko, O. D. Khmel'nitskaya, and L. P. Semenova, Influence exerted by mineral content of rebellious gold-and silver-bearing ores on the possibilities of their processing by biohydrometallurgical method. Ore beneficiation, Collected Works, Issue 5, Irkutsk (1994).

Solozhenkin, P.M., Lyalikova-Medvedeva, N.N. Biotechnology of Concentrate and Antimony Ore Processing. Journal of Mining Science 37, 534541 (2001). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:10

antimony mineral processing,antimony processing,antimony benificiation-beijing hot mining tech co ltd

antimony mineral processing,antimony processing,antimony benificiation-beijing hot mining tech co ltd

Proportion of antimony ore is far greater than proportion of gangue, so it will be separated by using the method gravity separation. This method has many features, high efficiency, energy saving, and environment protection, which can make the low-grade ore enrichment advance. After gravity separation, the antimony will be purified by floatation. So the processing method of HOT miningis gravity separation-flotation process.

The ore after hand sorting will go through coarse crushing and fine crushing, during which the size of mineral should be under 30mm, and screening classification have three size fractions, 8-30mm, 2-8mm, 0-2mm. then the three kind of minerals will go respectively into Jig, and HOT miningSawtooth Wave Jig to gravity separation. The mixted concentrate from the last stage will be go into the gravity concentrate district. Then after the process of gravity, there will be a process of floatation, the tailings from the preview gravity separation will be grinded, separated,stirred,andfloated. And the floatation will apply the process of roughing, three cleanings, and two scavenging;. Then high grade antimony fine powder will be produced. The tailings from the floatation will be reelected by shaking table to recycle the fine antimony particles, which we can get high grade antimony concentrate and tailings.

In one of HOT mining's project, antimony content is 3.09%, among which the share of antimony sulfide is about 94.78%, and a small amount of antimony is existed in valentinite or antimonite, about 4.82%. Carbon content of the ore is 6.54%, in which the inorganic carbon have up to 5.53%, and is antimony sulfide with high-carbon and very complex for dressing. After multi scheme of test, HOT miningfinally decided to use gravity separation-flotation process to recycle the antimony ore, and in the test the grade of antimony is 59.21%, the recovery rate of mixed antimony concentrate Is 94.13%. HOT miningachieved the maximum intensity of the recovery of the antimony ore, which reduced the environmental pollution caused by tailings and also gained excellent economic benefit.

antimony mineral processing

antimony mineral processing

Proportion of antimony ore is far greater than proportion of gangue, so it will be separated by using the method gravity separation. This method has many features, high efficiency, energy saving, and environment protection, which can make the low-gra

Proportion of antimony ore is far greater than proportion of gangue, so it will be separated by using the methodgravity separation. This method has many features, high efficiency, energy saving, and environment protection, which can make the low-grade ore enrichment advance. Aftergravity separation, the antimony will be purified byfloatation. So the processing method ofHOT miningis gravity separation-flotationprocess.

The ore after hand sorting will go through coarse crushingandfine crushing, during which the size of mineral should be under 30mm, andscreeningclassification have three size fractions, 8-30mm, 2-8mm, 0-2mm. then the three kind of minerals will go respectively into Jig, and HOT miningSawtooth Wave Jig to gravity separation. The mixted concentrate from the last stage will be go into the gravity concentrate district. Then after the process of gravity, there will be a process offloatation, the tailings from the preview gravity separation will be grinded, separated,stirred,andfloated. And the floatation will apply the process of roughing, three cleanings, and two scavenging;. Then high grade antimony fine powder will be produced. The tailings from the floatation will be reelected by shaking table to recycle the fine antimony particles, which we can get high grade antimony concentrate and tailings.

In one ofHOT mining's project, antimony content is 3.09%, among which the share of antimony sulfide is about 94.78%, and a small amount of antimonyisexisted in valentinite or antimonite, about 4.82%. Carbon content of the ore is 6.54%, in which the inorganic carbon have up to 5.53%, and is antimony sulfide with high-carbon and very complex for dressing. After multi scheme of test, HOT miningfinally decided to use gravity separation-flotation process to recycle the antimony ore, and in the test the grade of antimony is 59.21%, the recovery rate of mixed antimony concentrate Is 94.13%.HOT miningachieved the maximum intensity of the recovery of the antimony ore, which reduced the environmental pollution caused by tailings and also gained excellent economic benefit.

opposition to u.s. mineral mining could derail the green new deal

opposition to u.s. mineral mining could derail the green new deal

WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 20: Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY), Sen. Ed Markey (D-MA), and Rep. ... [+] Cori Bush (D-MO) record a video following a news conference to reintroduce the Green New Deal and introduce the Civilian Climate Corps Act at the Capitol Reflecting Pool near the West Front of the U.S. Capitol Building on Tuesday, April 20, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

The United States could be about to witness a replay of the politics of the Shale Revolution, only this time those politics will be playing out around the mining of the countrys own supplies of rare earth minerals. America has ample supplies of these minerals, which are crucial to the continued advancement of solar and wind power, as well as the batteries for electric vehicles. But the processes required in mining for those minerals are negatively impactful to the environment, as all extractive industries invariably are, and thus likely to become points of public controversy.

Enter the anti-development green lobby. Enter the Democratic Party politics that push the Green New Deal that envisions a rapid energy transition to renewables and electric vehicles and the abolition of fossil fuels and the internal combustion engine. The sparks will inevitably fly when the traditional priorities of these interest groups and policy goals collide with the realities on the ground.

During the early days of the shale revolution, there was initially a general consensus within both major political parties that Americas new abundance of natural gas from shale formations across the country presented an opportunity to dramatically reduce the countrys emissions of both carbon and pollutants through a rapid shift away from coal in power generation. But the consensus within the Democratic ranks quickly began to disintegrate as the green community that funds such a large portion of the partys campaigns mounted its campaign to demonize hydraulic fracturing (fracking) starting in 2008.

Today, the leaders of the Democratic party talk about natural gas in power generation more as a nuisance to be quickly eliminated than as a bridge fuel that has done so much to create cleaner air in this country. The question for those promoting this energy transition will inevitably become whether the same kinds of destructive and costly political dynamics can be avoided when it comes to efforts to mine for large U.S. resources of minerals such as lithium, cobalt and others?

With China becoming increasingly aggressive on the world stage, and working to tie up crucial global supplies of such minerals for its own future domestic needs, the ability for mining companies to access Americas own ample resources of those minerals in order to facilitate the Biden/Harris administrations Green New Deal-related goals is obvious. Today, the U.S. is overwhelmingly reliant on other countries - including China - for supplies of such minerals as antimony (2020 production: 53% from China, 20% from Russia, and 19% from Tajikistan, 0% from the US) cobalt (Congo accounts for 70% of global production) and lithium (U.S. production accounts for just 1% of its own needs).

For this energy transition to succeed in the U.S., it is obvious that the country must be able to produce its own supplies of these minerals. Yet, the processes for extraction of such minerals are quite impactful on the surrounding environment and are already being opposed by green groups in America. I detailed the processes involved with and opposition to the growing U.S. lithium industry in a piece several weeks ago.

The process for obtaining antimony, a rare earth mineral used in the production of solar panels, wind and hydro turbines, semi-conductors and batteries, is equally, if not more impactful. Antimony today is mostly obtained from the mining of stibnite, an alloy made up of antimony and Sulphur, and the vast majority of stibnite mining currently takes place in China. Already, the problems become obvious.

But they get worse. The most common method of mining for stibnite is via open pit mining, a process that U.S. green groups have traditionally opposed when use for mining of coal, copper and other important minerals. Whether these groups would remain intellectually consistent when it comes to mining for rare earth minerals needed to facilitate the Green New Deal remains to be seen.

Antimony also bonds to copper, gold and other precious metals, and can be obtained from mining operations for those minerals. Right now, we see the Biden/Harris Department of Interior working to delay a proposed Rio Tinto copper mine in Arizona due to green lobby opposition. In response to pressure from ESG investors, Rio Tinto plans for this to be an underground mine, not open pit, a major and costly concession that appears to have had no mitigating impact where the opposition is concerned. For the Green New Deal to succeed, something will have to ultimately give in cases such as this.

Cobalt is typically obtained as a by-product from the refining process related to nickel mining. Traditionally, nickel has been most commonly obtained as the result of extremely impactful surface strip-mining operations. America has abundant domestic resources of nickel, but again, the problems where the green community is concerned quickly become obvious.

The bottom line here is this: There will be no successful energy transition or Green New Deal implementation in the United States unless companies are allowed to access this countrys own plentiful supplies of these and other rare earth minerals. Anyone who is serious about the energy transition and countering Chinese dominance in critical mineral and rare earth development should support domestic policies that ensure responsible but swift mining development for these minerals.

David Blackmon is an independent energy analyst/consultant based in Mansfield, TX. He is the Editor of Shale Magazine and co-host of In The Oil Patch Radio, a nationally-syndicated weekly show. David has enjoyed a 40-year career in the oil and gas industry, the last 23 years of which were spent in the public policy arena, managing regulatory and legislative issues for various companies, including Burlington Resources, Shell, El Paso Corporation, FTI Consulting and LINN Energy. During this time, David has led numerous industry-wide efforts to address a variety of issues at the local, state and federal level, and from April 2010 through June 2012, he served as the Texas State Lead for Americas Natural Gas Alliance. In addition to client-related work, David also maintains a growing media communications practice.

David Blackmon is an independent energy analyst/consultant based in Mansfield, TX. He is the Editor of Shale Magazine and co-host of In The Oil Patch Radio, a nationally-syndicated weekly show. David has enjoyed a 40-year career in the oil and gas industry, the last 23 years of which were spent in the public policy arena, managing regulatory and legislative issues for various companies, including Burlington Resources, Shell, El Paso Corporation, FTI Consulting and LINN Energy. During this time, David has led numerous industry-wide efforts to address a variety of issues at the local, state and federal level, and from April 2010 through June 2012, he served as the Texas State Lead for Americas Natural Gas Alliance. In addition to client-related work, David also maintains a growing media communications practice.

advanced text-mining for trend analysis of russias extractive industries - sciencedirect

advanced text-mining for trend analysis of russias extractive industries - sciencedirect

Russias extractive industry seeks local technologies to replace expensive technology-intense imports.Russia sees opportunities to become a prominent provider of specialized equipment and services for the production of oil, gas.To identify technological developments, Russia is increasingly building competencies around foresight activities.Presented foresight study combines the subjective opinions gathered through expert workshops with text-mining techniques.The presented methodology helped to link the technologies to dominant professional discussions and to flag key trends.

The world economy relies on access to industrial metals, oil and gas for maintaining its critical industrial infrastructure. Although demand is likely to remain high, the most accessible deposits have been depleted. Future capacity growth will be facilitated through further technological developments. Russia as a leading producer is paying great attention to strengthening its competitive edge in global markets. This paper reports on a large-scale technology foresight study of the Russian extractive sector (including oil and gas), which combined expert-based foresight activities with statistical analyses and text-mining techniques based on artificial intelligence and machine learning technologies. The presented methodology helped to link the technologies to dominant discussions (e.g. climate change vs rural development) and to flag key trends. Furthermore, quantitative estimates can be identified quickly. The studys methodology should function as an example for similar studies to support policy planning and investment decisions based on text-mining techniques.

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