building a stone walkway | how-tos | diy

building a stone walkway | how-tos | diy

There are many types of building stone available, so it's important to choose one suitable for the walkway you want to create. You also want to choose stone that complements your yard and home. In this project, were using a rough-cut flagstone for a random, rustic look appropriate to its lawn and garden setting. When buying stone for a walkway or any other building project, consider these criteria: Climate: If winters are cold where you live, use dense stone like granite, bluestone or quartzite that can withstand freezing temperatures. Softer, more porous stones like limestone and sandstone are better suited to warmer areas because when temperatures fall below freezing, any water they absorb could cause them to spall and crack. Style: Use stone that suits your homes architectural style. The clean, sharp lines of modular or geometric-shaped stone make it a good choice for contemporary homes; brick and cut stone blocks, called ashlar, are more suitable for traditional or period homes; and the rustic look of rough, irregular stone adds to the character of country homes. Function: A widely spaced, random stone path, such as the walkway we're creating, is better suited for gardens or secondary paths across lawns or in backyards. For a high-traffic walkway leading to a home's entry, choose smooth, uniformly cut stone set with tight joints to prevent trips and make walking easier. This project features a walkway that branches off from the front gate and meanders around the side of the home to the backyard. To give it a rustic look, we're using flagstone for the path and cobblestones for a border. The path will be in a low-traffic area and we want it to blend in with the lawn and garden plantings, so we've designed it with wide grass joints between the stones.

There are many types of building stone available, so it's important to choose one suitable for the walkway you want to create. You also want to choose stone that complements your yard and home. In this project, were using a rough-cut flagstone for a random, rustic look appropriate to its lawn and garden setting.

Climate: If winters are cold where you live, use dense stone like granite, bluestone or quartzite that can withstand freezing temperatures. Softer, more porous stones like limestone and sandstone are better suited to warmer areas because when temperatures fall below freezing, any water they absorb could cause them to spall and crack.

Style: Use stone that suits your homes architectural style. The clean, sharp lines of modular or geometric-shaped stone make it a good choice for contemporary homes; brick and cut stone blocks, called ashlar, are more suitable for traditional or period homes; and the rustic look of rough, irregular stone adds to the character of country homes.

Function: A widely spaced, random stone path, such as the walkway we're creating, is better suited for gardens or secondary paths across lawns or in backyards. For a high-traffic walkway leading to a home's entry, choose smooth, uniformly cut stone set with tight joints to prevent trips and make walking easier.

This project features a walkway that branches off from the front gate and meanders around the side of the home to the backyard. To give it a rustic look, we're using flagstone for the path and cobblestones for a border. The path will be in a low-traffic area and we want it to blend in with the lawn and garden plantings, so we've designed it with wide grass joints between the stones.

Flagstone comes in a variety of thicknesses, ranging from one to four inches. If there are no stone yards or quarries in your area, you can order it through your local builder's supply. It's usually bundled on wooden pallets and sold by weight. One pallet typically contains one and a half tons of stone. Depending on thickness, one ton of flagstone will cover 80 to 100 square feet of walkway.

Calculate the square footage of the walkway area to estimate the quantities of material you'll need. First, determine the approximate width of your path, then multiply that number by the walkway's length, which will give you the square foot total. Your stone supplier should be able to provide the right amount of materials based on your figures. Flagstone (Image 1) comes in a variety of thicknesses, ranging from one to four inches. If there are no stone yards or quarries in your area, you can order it through your local builder's supply. It's usually bundled on wooden pallets and sold by weight. One pallet typically contains one and a half tons of stone. Depending on thickness, one ton of flagstone will cover 80 to 100 square feet of walkway. Flagstone may be set directly on well-drained earth, but placing it on a base of gravel or sand ensures drainage and makes it easier to bed and level rough, heavy stone. In areas where freezing and frost heave can be a problem, the gravel also provides room for ice to expand and prevents the individual stones from lifting. Many of our flagstones will sit on a layer of crusher run (Image 2, bottom), a type of gravel made of crushed limestone, which can be purchased along with the stone. Crusher run is sold by the cubic yard. Its a good idea to buy about 10 percent more than your estimate to avoid additional delivery costs if you run short. For this project, we also used about 25 four-inch cobblestones (Image 2, top) to edge the portion of the walkway that runs through a flowerbed.

Calculate the square footage of the walkway area to estimate the quantities of material you'll need. First, determine the approximate width of your path, then multiply that number by the walkway's length, which will give you the square foot total. Your stone supplier should be able to provide the right amount of materials based on your figures.

Flagstone (Image 1) comes in a variety of thicknesses, ranging from one to four inches. If there are no stone yards or quarries in your area, you can order it through your local builder's supply. It's usually bundled on wooden pallets and sold by weight. One pallet typically contains one and a half tons of stone. Depending on thickness, one ton of flagstone will cover 80 to 100 square feet of walkway. Flagstone may be set directly on well-drained earth, but placing it on a base of gravel or sand ensures drainage and makes it easier to bed and level rough, heavy stone. In areas where freezing and frost heave can be a problem, the gravel also provides room for ice to expand and prevents the individual stones from lifting. Many of our flagstones will sit on a layer of crusher run (Image 2, bottom), a type of gravel made of crushed limestone, which can be purchased along with the stone. Crusher run is sold by the cubic yard. Its a good idea to buy about 10 percent more than your estimate to avoid additional delivery costs if you run short.

Start by laying the flagstones on top of the grass to check spacing (Image 1). Arrange pieces to make the path look natural, and rearrange the stones as necessary to obtain a random balance of color and shape (Image 2). As a general rule, lay two smaller pieces of flagstone adjacent to every large one. Walk on the stones to see whether they're stable and spaced to accommodate a comfortable gait. Adjust them if they're too far apart or too close together. Be sure the joints the space between the flagstone pieces are consistent. Joints should be no more than four inches wide (Image 3).

Use a garden trowel or spade to cut through the turf around each stone (Image 1). You need to penetrate only the grass and roots sod layer about an inch or two deep at this point. Move the stones away; remove the underlying sod (Image 2), and set it aside for later. As outlined below, dig out about four inches of soil for your gravel base (Image 3), depending on the thickness of each piece of flagstone. If using thicker stones, you can set them directly on the soil without crusher run (Image 4). Their bulk makes them far less likely to move. Thinner flagstones will require a layer of crusher run one to three inches deep to ensure stability and create a firm base (Image 5). Use a hand tamper (a length of 4x4 works well) to flatten and level the loose material.

Use a garden trowel or spade to cut through the turf around each stone (Image 1). You need to penetrate only the grass and roots sod layer about an inch or two deep at this point. Move the stones away; remove the underlying sod (Image 2), and set it aside for later. As outlined below, dig out about four inches of soil for your gravel base (Image 3), depending on the thickness of each piece of flagstone.

If using thicker stones, you can set them directly on the soil without crusher run (Image 4). Their bulk makes them far less likely to move. Thinner flagstones will require a layer of crusher run one to three inches deep to ensure stability and create a firm base (Image 5). Use a hand tamper (a length of 4x4 works well) to flatten and level the loose material.

Use a rubber mallet to pound the stone into the gravel until its surface is flush with the surrounding sod surface. Use a level to make sure the individual stones are equal in height and level with the ground around them, and that none are set too high.

First, use the mason's chipping hammers single flat tine to chip or score a cutline across the back of the stone, then turn the stone right-side up and repeat this scoring along a corresponding line across the stone face. Then use the tools hammer end to rap sharply along the line to break the stone. Chip away any sharp stone spurs.

Add a one-inch-deep layer of loose gravel on top of the crusher run base. Because each stone has a different thickness, adjust the amount of gravel for the correct depth and level (Image 1). Use a rubber mallet to pound the stone into the gravel until its surface is flush with the surrounding sod surface (Image 2). Use a level to make sure the individual stones are equal in height and level with the ground around them, and that none are set too high. This will prevent people from tripping while also allowing for mowing over the walkway. Check the stones for stability by rocking back and forth on each with your full weight (Image 3). If a flagstone wobbles, adjust the gravel base underneath as needed (Image 4). Because this walkway is supposed to look rustic and natural, you don't need to "dress" each stone to remove or reshape irregularities. If you have to cut a stone for any reason, however, it can be accomplished with a mason's chipping hammer. Wear protective glasses to shield your eyes against flying stone chips when you do this. First, use the hammers single flat tine to chip or score a cutline across the back of the stone, then turn the stone right-side up and repeat this scoring along a corresponding line across the stone face (Image 5). Then use the tools hammer end to rap sharply along the line to break the stone. Chip away any sharp stone spurs. Continue placing and setting the flagstones until the path is complete.

Add a one-inch-deep layer of loose gravel on top of the crusher run base. Because each stone has a different thickness, adjust the amount of gravel for the correct depth and level (Image 1). Use a rubber mallet to pound the stone into the gravel until its surface is flush with the surrounding sod surface (Image 2). Use a level to make sure the individual stones are equal in height and level with the ground around them, and that none are set too high. This will prevent people from tripping while also allowing for mowing over the walkway.

Because this walkway is supposed to look rustic and natural, you don't need to "dress" each stone to remove or reshape irregularities. If you have to cut a stone for any reason, however, it can be accomplished with a mason's chipping hammer. Wear protective glasses to shield your eyes against flying stone chips when you do this.

First, use the hammers single flat tine to chip or score a cutline across the back of the stone, then turn the stone right-side up and repeat this scoring along a corresponding line across the stone face (Image 5). Then use the tools hammer end to rap sharply along the line to break the stone. Chip away any sharp stone spurs. Continue placing and setting the flagstones until the path is complete.

Dig a shallow trench, approximately six inches wide and six inches deep, on each side of the walkway. Next, mix preblended cement-sand mortar mix according to the manufacturer's instructions. For convenience, prepare just enough at a time to remain workable for a half hour or so.

Position the cobblestones so they sit an inch or two above the level of the walkway. Use a rubber mallet to tap the cobblestones firmly into the mortar. Once a few are set, use a level to keep the cobblestone tops consistent with each other.

If the walkway goes through a flower bed or garden, a decorative border can help to define the path and hold back mulch (Image 1). In this project we used four-inch square cobblestones for the border. First, dig a shallow trench, approximately six inches wide and six inches deep, on each side of the walkway. Next, mix preblended cement-sand mortar mix according to the manufacturer's instructions. For convenience, prepare just enough at a time to remain workable for a half hour or so. Place a three-inch deep layer of mortar in the trench bottom (Image 2), then position the cobblestones so they sit an inch or two above the level of the walkway (Image 3). Use a rubber mallet to tap the cobblestones firmly into the mortar. Once a few are set, use a level to keep the cobblestone tops consistent with each other. To add strength to the border, place some mortar along the outer edges of the cobblestones (Image 4), below the path surface, and trowel it smooth at a slight angle away from the stone sides.

First, dig a shallow trench, approximately six inches wide and six inches deep, on each side of the walkway. Next, mix preblended cement-sand mortar mix according to the manufacturer's instructions. For convenience, prepare just enough at a time to remain workable for a half hour or so.

Place a three-inch deep layer of mortar in the trench bottom (Image 2), then position the cobblestones so they sit an inch or two above the level of the walkway (Image 3). Use a rubber mallet to tap the cobblestones firmly into the mortar. Once a few are set, use a level to keep the cobblestone tops consistent with each other. To add strength to the border, place some mortar along the outer edges of the cobblestones (Image 4), below the path surface, and trowel it smooth at a slight angle away from the stone sides.

Use pieces of the grass sod previously set aside to fill any gaps between the flagstones and the surrounding turf (Image 1). Rake the entire work area, being careful not to disturb the replanted grass (Image 2). Wash off the stones with a garden hose to remove debris and help resettle the grass (Images 3 and 4). You can begin using the walkway right away (Image 5), and in a few days the grass will reestablish itself and your stone path will look like it's been there for years.

crushers for sale at grinder crushers screen

crushers for sale at grinder crushers screen

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gravel driveway cost | cost to build gravel driveway

gravel driveway cost | cost to build gravel driveway

Driveways are integral to every property and are built and finished in a variety of ways. Using gravel is an inexpensive method to create a driveway. A gravel driveway is made up of layers of stone, designed to drain and withstand cars driving on it. There are several options for creating a gravel driveway from the method to the materials used.

This means that there is a wide range of stone costs. The national average to build a gravel driveway is $1,000 - $3,000, with most people spending around $1,750 on a 2-car gravel driveway topped with decomposed granite.

Updated the introduction with a new project scope, project costs, and an average range.Added a section on the cost per square foot.Added a section on the cost per yard.Added a section on the cost of a driveway per size.Added a section on the costs of various materials with a table and subsections.Added a section on the amount of gravel needed.Added a section on the depth of a gravel driveway.Added a section on costs for a stabilized gravel driveway.Added a section on the cost to build the driveway.Added a section on the cost factors involved in building a gravel driveway.Added a section on the benefits of a gravel driveway.Added a section on the cost of a gravel road.Added a section on the cost of a gravel parking lot.Added a section on gravel vs asphalt costs.Added a section on the maintenance for a gravel driveway.Updated the enhancements section with information on drainage, driveway gardens, paving, and repair.Updated the additional considerations section with information on permits, delivery, DIY purchase, and the least expensive gravel.Added an FAQ section with 5 questions and answers.Updated the final costs with a new average range.

Gravel driveways are among the least expensive driveways to build. They go down in layers, and the only real labor is dumping and spreading the stone, so they have a fairly low overall cost. The average cost per square foot ranges from $1 - $3, depending on the stone used.

If your driveway needs significant grading or uses premium materials, the cost is considerably higher. In addition, if you choose to create a stabilized gravel driveway, your costs also include the structure beneath the gravel, which adds $3 - $7 to your total costs. This makes the average price of a stabilized gravel driveway between $4 and $10 a square foot.

The cost of driveway gravel per cubic yard varies depending on the type of gravel used. Costs for materials start at $15 a cubic yard for base materials and go as high as $100 a cubic yard for some premium materials.

While every driveway is different in terms of scale, gravel depth, and the cost of the gravel used, there are some average sizes for 1, 2, and 3-car driveways, which give you an estimate of the total cost:

Your driveway needs to be made of at least three layers of stone, which start about the size of baseballs and gradually shrink to small gravel. From there, you have a choice of what kind of material to use, particularly when it comes to the top layer - the layer most visible.

Item #4 is one of the options used as a base for a gravel driveway. Driveways are built up in three layers, with the first measuring roughly 3 - 4 inches deep. Item #4 is made of a mixture of crushed gravel with sand and dirt mixed in. It may also contain recycled material like asphalt or made of limestone or bluestone. Any of these are suitable as a base layer. Item #4 costs between $12 and $22 a ton.

Base gravel #3 is the most common base for a gravel driveway. It is made up of stone measuring 1 - 2 inches in diameter and is sometimes called clean stone. It is a mixture of crushed stone with irregular edges and costs $15 - $25 a ton.

Crushed granite or decomposed granite is a material most commonly used on the top of a gravel driveway. It is a fine mixture of crushed granite material combined with some rock dust. This finer texture means that it packs tightly on top of your driveway, forming a longer-lasting layer. Crushed granite comes in a few colors, depending on its origin. Expect costs of around $25 - $50 a ton.

Quarry process or crusher run is another material used on the top of a driveway. It is a fine mixture of crushed stone and stone dust. The dust packs and settles between the larger fragments to form a smoother driveway surface. Using the quarry process increases your total costs because you need to crown your driveway or make the center higher than the sides so that it drains properly without damaging the surface. It costs between $40 - $50 a ton.

River rocks are smooth stones measuring inch to 2 inches in size. They make a beautiful surface but not a good surface. If you want to add them to your driveway, they should be used as a border because they do not hold up well to car tires. Used as a border, they contain gravel, so you do not need to work as hard to maintain your driveway. River rock gravel costs approximately $45 - $100 a ton.

Crushed stone #57 is the second layer of your driveway. It goes on top of item #4 or gravel #3. This is an irregular stone roughly the size of a golf ball. It is also a machine-crushed stone but rougher than the others. You want at least 3 - 4 inches of this material to facilitate drainage beneath your final gravel. It is frequently made from limestone but can be made of other materials. Expect costs of between $66 - $75 a ton.

Jersey shore gravel is a pretty, yellow stone with a smooth texture and rounded surface. It makes a beautiful driveway but is not usually recommended for this use because the smooth stones move frequently, falling off your driveway and onto the sides. If you use this material, it requires very high maintenance and replenishing the stones every 1 - 2 years. Alternatively, Jersey shore gravel makes an excellent border stone and costs $85 - $100 a ton.

Pea gravel gets its name from its shape, size, and surface texture. This stone comes in a range of colors and consists of small, smooth pebbles rather than a rough crushed stone. Pea gravel makes a beautiful driveway but has the same problems as Jersey shore gravel. It migrates easily and makes your driveway very high maintenance. You spend more time raking it back and adding extra material every 1 - 2 years. Expect costs of around $100 - $180 a ton.

Marble chips are another material that makes a stunning top to a gravel driveway, but it is not always recommended. This is normally a white marble with a fairly smooth texture, so it does not interlock well and may migrate.

If you live in Virginia, however, you may be able to get mixed marble chips made from mosaics. These are often smaller chips that are perfect for driveways and come in a rainbow of colors. This depends on the area and is not always available. Marble chips cost $100 - $400 a ton.

Get a very basic estimate by measuring the length and width of your driveway and multiplying these numbers together to get the square feet. Next, multiply this by the depth of your finished driveway, which varies by material. Most driveways are 8 - 12-inches deep. This gives you cubic feet. Divide this by 27 to get the total number of cubic yards. One ton of gravel is roughly equal to 1.13 cubic yards, but this number changes depending on the gravel size. Multiply the number of cubic yards by 1.13 to get a very rough estimate of how many tons of gravel you need.

Remember that you need three separate types of gravel to complete your driveway, and each has a different recommended depth. For this reason, it is advised that you speak to your landscaper or contractor to find out how much gravel you need.

Gravel driveways should ideally measure 12-inches deep, made up of 3 layers of material, which are 4-inches deep each. For some materials, however, 3 inches may be adequate. This includes your base layer of #3 gravel or item #4, followed by a layer of #57 gravel, and topped with the finish material of your choice.

Most gravel driveways need to have new gravel added every 2 - 4 years. This is because the gravel migrates off the top, due to car tires, snowplows, shovels, and simple wear and tear. With a stabilized gravel driveway, more gravel stays where it belongs, so it requires less maintenance and does not need to be replenished as often.

Stabilized driveways consist of a set of honeycombs set into the ground filled with gravel. The honeycombs hold the gravel in one spot so that it does not migrate. They are made of a few different materials and have varying depths and sizes, depending on your needs. They add $3 - $7 a square foot to your total costs, making the total cost $4 - $10 a square foot.

Labor varies a lot, mostly due to the condition of the area before you begin. It is common to excavate the area down about 12 inches because it will be built up with gravel. The driveway also needs to be graded then compacted before the first layer goes down.

From there, the labor is fairly easy: dumping and spreading the three gravel types. Contractors charge between $60 and $100 an hour for this work. This makes up the bulk of the cost of the project. Assuming 6 tons of gravel - two tons per layer - the average material cost works out to $400 - $500, plus $100 for delivery for a two-car driveway. The remaining $1,150 - $1,250 is for labor costs.

Many factors affect the total cost of a gravel driveway. These include its shape and size, gravel type, and depth, as well as the slope, location, and condition the area was in before you began. The more excavating that needs to be done, the higher the costs. Likewise, adding edging or stabilizing the driveway to help prevent migration also increases your total costs. Using a premium material or doing a chip seal driveway where the gravel is added to a bitumen layer also increases the total project costs.

The biggest advantage of installing a gravel driveway is the cost. Gravel is less expensive than concrete or asphalt, so it is a good choice if you have a very long driveway. Gravel is very attractive if it has a good depth and a nice color to the stone.

They are difficult to maintain because they require a lot of raking and stone replacement. They may not be plowed down to the stone either because it removes stone from the driveway. You also need to add new gravel every 2 - 4 years on average to help it look its best.

While the cost range to build a gravel driveway is $1 - $3 a square foot, the cost range to build a gravel road is completely different and varies from road to road. Costs start closer to $4 a square foot and go as high as $10 a square foot, depending on the gravel type, grading, slope, and size and shape of the road.

Gravel parking lots have similar costs to gravel driveways but often need additional drainage if the parking lot becomes big enough. Some gravel types drain through to the ground, but most allow the water to run off like asphalt or concrete. For a driveway, crowning is usually sufficient, but for a parking lot, you have the same costs to add and spread the gravel at $1 - $3 a square foot, but you may have added costs for drainage.

Gravel is one of the least expensive methods of creating a permanent driveway. For a two-car driveway, they cost around $1,750 for a medium-grade gravel. In contrast, the same size asphalt driveway costs nearly double at $3,600 for a mid-grade bitumen, making gravel much more affordable.

Gravel driveways take a lot of maintenance to keep them at their best. This includes raking the gravel back from the edges to redistribute it a few times a year. You need to add more gravel to it every 2 - 4 years on average, and occasionally, you may also need to have it crowned or built up in the middle to help water run off more easily.

They still form potholes, particularly in rainy climates, and you need to fill these regularly. In addition, gravel sometimes has weeds or grass growing through it, which needs to be dealt with to keep your driveway at its best.

Gravel driveways are painted using either acrylic or oil-based paint. Any movement of the stones brings unpainted stone up to the top, so painting may need to be done several times. Painting costs $1 - $2 a square foot.

The cost to pave a gravel driveway varies depending on what you are paving it with. Asphalt starts at around $4,000, while concrete begins at around $5,000. This includes grading and removal of the gravel.

Updated the introduction with a new project scope, project costs, and an average range.Added a section on the cost per square foot.Added a section on the cost per yard.Added a section on the cost of a driveway per size.Added a section on the costs of various materials with a table and subsections.Added a section on the amount of gravel needed.Added a section on the depth of a gravel driveway.Added a section on costs for a stabilized gravel driveway.Added a section on the cost to build the driveway.Added a section on the cost factors involved in building a gravel driveway.Added a section on the benefits of a gravel driveway.Added a section on the cost of a gravel road.Added a section on the cost of a gravel parking lot.Added a section on gravel vs asphalt costs.Added a section on the maintenance for a gravel driveway.Updated the enhancements section with information on drainage, driveway gardens, paving, and repair.Updated the additional considerations section with information on permits, delivery, DIY purchase, and the least expensive gravel.Added an FAQ section with 5 questions and answers.Updated the final costs with a new average range.

how to build a rock crusher | home guides | sf gate

how to build a rock crusher | home guides | sf gate

Rock crushers come in many shapes and sizes, from the strictly hand-held to the complex industrial sizes, which can crush tons of rock and ore in one day. Making your own rock crusher invariably requires you or someone you know to possess some basic welding skills. Iron is the ore of choice when it comes to breaking rocks into hand-sized pieces and a skilled or even semi-skilled welder are the only people who can shape iron. This particular kind of rock crusher is perfect for homeowners or amateur prospectors.

Quickly insert the 3-foot iron rod into the cement. Move it until it stands at the center of the pipe. You may have to prop it in place by fixing a C-clamp to it and laying the clamp on the top of the pipe. Let the cement dry -- even quick dry cement may take 4 to 6 hours to set.

Victor Fonseca started writing professionally in 1998. His specialties are history, popular culture, and information technology. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in political science from Southern Methodist University and spent a year studying at the American University of Rome.

diy homemade rock crusher

diy homemade rock crusher

The 911JAC12KMINI RockCrusher is our most small rock crusher for the smallest budget. It contains all the high quality precision pre-cut and ready to weld machined parts of a small jaw crusher. It is a Do-it-yourself version of onMini Crusher.You need to supply the 1 HPmotor of your choice.This 1 x 2homemade rock crusher is mini in size but large in crushing performance. This small jaw crusher kit comes with full how-to-build instructions.HANDYMAN ALERT: The final assembly of this small crusher kitrequires some simplewelding.

the complete guide to crushed stone and gravel

the complete guide to crushed stone and gravel

In this article, we are going to take a deep dive into the types of crushed stone and gravel, how they are made, and their basic applications. You may not be a quarry expert at the end, but you will understand the basics for your next concrete or hardscaping project!

Most crushed stone is produced in quarries and is crushed when machinery breaks up and crushes larger rocks. Instead of being shaped or formed naturally, such as in a riverbed or canyon, crushed stone is produced with man-made machinery and processes.

It begins with using a rock crusher in a quarry or site with plenty of large rocks. There are many types of crushers, but their main job is the same: Crush larger rocks into smaller pieces to be used for construction material.

Crushed stone is then passed through different screeners to be organized and stored in different piles according to their size. The screening process starts by removing larger stones, then medium stones, and eventually goes all the way down to the stone dust.

This screening is important because contractors need very specific types of crushed stone to complete different types of projects. For example, you dont want large stones in ready mix concrete, and you dont want stone dust in drainage systems.

After being sorted into different piles depending on the size of the stone, the stone is ready to be shipped from the quarry. Quarries deliver directly to job sites, to concrete plants, or to wholesale distributors who sell the stone through retail to customers.

Because large stones and quarries are hard on tires and require heavy metal, crushed stone was hard to make and transport until heavy machinery with tracks was developed. WW2 expedited the development of this machinery, and crushed stone began to be widely used in construction projects in the 1940s and 1950s.

Large-scale building projects, particularly in infrastructure like the Eisenhower Interstate System, helped usher in an era where crushed stone was used in almost every part of construction. Foundations, concrete, drainage systems, and roads were all needing large quantities of crushed stone.

An example of this often occurs when a road is being replaced or resurfaced. Many road construction companies are beginning to grind and crush the existing road as they remove it. This crushed road, which is essentially crushed stone, then becomes the base for the new road.

The exact amount of crushed stone recycling is unknown due to a lack of reporting. Much of the crushed stone is also recycled right on the construction site, especially with road construction, and this makes it difficult to measure.

The most common use for recycled crushed stone is as a base for roadways, especially when the old road can be torn up, crushed, and reused. Concrete blocks and bricks can also be crushed and recycled as a base.

Crushed stone often has an angular and jagged edge that occurs during the crushing process. Gravel, on the other hand, typically has a very smooth texture and surface because of the natural weathering and wear of being exposed to the effects of running water.

Metamorphic: Metamorphic rocks become changed through intense heat or pressure. Similar to clay hardening in an oven, metamorphic rocks become very hard and crystallized by intense or heat or pressure.

If you go to a creek or river, you see all types of rocks, both large and small. These larger rocks can be used for foundations or other building projects, but typically gravel is screened and only the smaller pieces are used.

Pea gravel: Pea gravel is some of the smallest gravel - typically or smaller in size. Pea gravel is often used in places like fish tanks, walkways, swimming pools, or other places where foot traffic occurs or small gravel is needed.

When thinking of construction, it is important to know what kinds of rock are ideal for specific applications. After all, if a rock type crumbles easily under pressure, you dont want to use it as a component in ready mix concrete or pavement.

Granite: An igneous rock that is durable and is easily polished. Because of the color, grain, and polishing ability; they are often used inside homes for countertops or on the outside of monumental or civic buildings. However, they can also be used on bridge piers and river walls.

Limestone: A sedimentary rock that is the most commonly used to make crushed stone in the United States. One of the most versatile rocks for construction, limestone is able to be crushed easily making it a primary rock used in ready mix concrete, road construction, and railroads. It is widely available in quarries across the country.

Slate: A metamorphic rock typically found in layers. Because it is easily mined and cut in these natural layers, it works well in applications requiring thin rock layers. Common examples are roofing tiles, certain types of chalkboards, gravestones, and some pavement applications.

Laterite: A metamorphic rock with a highly porous and sponge structure. It is easily quarried in block form and used as a building stone. However, it is important to plaster the surface to eliminate the pores.

Stone dust: This is the very fine dust, similar to sand, that is created as the stone is crushed. Stone dust is useful when tamping or packing stone, but it causes problems for applications where water needs to drain, such as behind a retaining wall.

Clean stone: If crushed stone is clean, it has been screened so the majority of the stone dust has been removed, but some dust is still mixed in. This is useful for the top layer of a stone driveway or other places where some minor compaction is not harmful.

Washed clean stone: This is stone that has been screened like clean stone, but then also washed to ensure there is no stone dust on the finished product. This is often used for drainage purposes, for ready mix concrete, or places that need aesthetic appeal, such as curbing or decorative stone.

Crushed stone: If you hear the generic crushed stone term, it usually refers to stone that has a mixture of stone dust in it. This type of stone is best used for a base when heavy compaction is needed. As a result, it is typically used for the base of concrete and paving projects, foundations of structures, and driveway bases.

Or, if we were putting the base down for a patio, we want stone that compacts well and makes a strong base. Therefore, we want our stone to have stone dust, so we would call the quarry and order 2 crushed stone.

When putting down gravel in a flowerbed, make sure you start by laying down a quality landscape fabric, securely stake the fabric in place, and then layer the gravel on top of the fabric, usually 2-3 thick.

Stone dust compacts and hardens, especially when it becomes wet. Since drains need to always be open, it is important to keep stone dust out of drains. Therefore, construction projects needing drainage systems make sure they use only stone that has been cleaned and washed.

Crushed stone and gravel will continue to be a staple in construction, decoration, and industry for years to come. As recycling picks up, mining and quarries may slow down, but we will always need crushed stone in general construction and industry.

If you want to learn more about ready mix concrete and preparing for it, read our blog post on the Beginner's guide to concrete and the complete guide to pouring concrete in different types of weather.

how to build a stone crusher

how to build a stone crusher

For each project scheme design, we will use professional knowledge to help you, carefully listen to your demands, respect your opinions, and use our professional teams and exert our greatest efforts to create a more suitable project scheme for you and realize the project investment value and profit more quickly.

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4 types of stone crushers' maintenance and efficient improvement | fote machinery

4 types of stone crushers' maintenance and efficient improvement | fote machinery

There are different types of stone crushers in mining industry such as jaw crusher, cone crusher, impact crusher, and sand making machine. This article will tell you how to maintain the 4 types of rock crushers and how to efficicently improve their performance.

Many stone crusher operators have a common coception that is "don't-fix-it-if-it-isn't-broke". They may want to save cost at the begining while the consequence is that they have to spend more money on repair and face interuption on production. That's why I always say that preventive and predictive is very important for all types of stone crusher.

Preventive means that by making regular checklist and inspections to keep crushers in good condition. Maintenance checklist is usually set up on a daily (8 hours), weekly (40 hours), monthly (200 hours), yearly (2,000 hours). Only doing that, can you prolong the machine's life span and maximize its value in crushing process.

Predictive refers to mornitoring the condition of crusher when it is running. By some maintenance tools such as lubricating oil temperature sensors, lubricating oil filter condition indicator, you can timely draw the machine data so that making a comparison between the real situation and normal state. Predictive can help you find problem early then timely removing thers issues before demage occuring.

Ractive means that even if your crushers have got problems, as long as you adopt correct solutions to respond, you still can get your machine back to normal. Next, I'll introduce important skills to maintain your equipment.

The cone crusher in the secondary or tertiary crushing proccess often fractures medium-hard or hard rocks like pebble, quartz, granite, etc. It is easy to get premature crusher failure, if operators cannot make a correct and timely inspection and maintenance.

Mantle in moveable cone and concave is fixed cone. Due to directly contacting with rock materials, the two wear parts need frequent maintenance and protection. So operators have to know the preparations and maintaining skills.

The working principle of impact crusher is that the spinning rotor under the driving of the motor can genetate strong impact force which make blow bars crush stone material into small pieces. Then the crushed material would be thrown by hammers towards, which makes another crushing process "stone to stone".

The sand making machine is also known as the vertical shaft impact crusher. Its working mode is that the material falls vertically from the upper part of the machine into the high-speed rotating impeller. The impeller is one of the important parts of the sand making machine, and it is also the most vulnerable part.

After the materials collide with each other, they will be pulverized and smashed between the impeller for multiple times and discharged from the lower part. The materials crushed by the device have an excellent particle size and are suitable for aggregate shaping, artificial sand making and highway construction.

In the face of such a dazzling market, how to choose the production equipment suitable for users' actual needs among the numerous equipment brands of many machinery manufacturers is a big problem for many large and small enterprises. Here we list top 4 world's construction equipment manufacturers for you to choose:

As a leading mining machinery manufacturer and exporter in China, we are always here to provide you with high quality products and better services. Welcome to contact us through one of the following ways or visit our company and factories.

Based on the high quality and complete after-sales service, our products have been exported to more than 120 countries and regions. Fote Machinery has been the choice of more than 200,000 customers.

how much crushed stone do you need? a sure-fire formula

how much crushed stone do you need? a sure-fire formula

So you are planning this great DIY project for the summer that will spruce up your yard considerably. You are quite excited, but there is just one problem: It requires crushed stone, and you have no clue how to calculate how much you will need.Crushed stone is a material that is typically used as a base or underlayment, upon which the stuff that actually shows -- for example, the concrete of a patio -- will rest. Guessing is rarely a good solution to such dilemmas when undertaking a big project, so let's look ata (relatively) simple way to figure out the correct amount.

The word, "relatively" is used because a formula is involved. And many of us, as soon as we hear the word, "formula," start quivering with fear. "What, math? Hey, I didn't sign up for this. I just want to do a DIY project. What sadist decided to make math part of it?" This is understandable, so some reassurance is called for. When the formula is actually provided for you (as opposed to your having to think up the formula, yourself), it is really pretty easy to use. All you have to do is plug in some numbers. So take a deep breath and let's get started:

In the construction world, most materials are measured in cubic yards. Multiply the length (L), in feet, by the width (W), in feet, by theheight (H), in feet,and divide by 27. This will tell you how many cubic yards of crushed stone you need.

As an example, let's say your DIY project is a patio, and it calls for the use of crushed stone as a base. If your patio is 20 feet long and 10 feet wide, and you need6 inches of crushed stone for the base, you would plug those numbers into formula, like this:

If your number comes out as a fraction -- and it probably will -- round up. In the example above, you would round the 3.7 cubic yards of crushed stone to 4 cubic yards of crushed stone. It is better to have a little extra than to run short.

Crushed stone is produced by passing stones through a crushing machine at a quarry. Various types of stone are used in this operation, such asgranite and limestone. At the bottom of the crushing machine lies a screen that traps the the crushed stone product (the finer material that passes through the screen is also kept and sold -- as stone dust).

Above, mention was made of using crush stone as a base for various DIY projects, such as those that would involve pouring a concrete slab. But this material has a wide range of applications in the landscape. While it often serves as a base for something else (in which cases no one actually sees it once the project is complete), this is not always the case.

how to build a gravel shed foundation [essential guide]

how to build a gravel shed foundation [essential guide]

Its not a matter of just dumping gravel on the ground if you want a lasting stable solid base to protect your shed. A well-made gravel foundation can support your shed directly or other foundation styles for your shed.

To build a solid stable gravel shed foundation remove the grass and topsoil and level the ground. Compact the loose soil and cover with a weed barrier. Cover the barrier with gravel and spread it out evenly with a shovel and metal garden rake. Use a gasoline-powered compactor to tamp down the gravel. Do the final grading with a rake, and your foundation is ready for your shed.

In this article, Ill show you how to level and square up your site and what type of gravel or crushed stone makes a stable base. Ill discuss how to build a boxed and unboxed gravel pad, and how to anchor your shed on a gravel foundation.

Hopefully, Ill save you a few steps, a bucket of sweat, some money, and youll learn how to build a gravel shed foundation. Quick NavigationWhat is Gravel Shed Foundation?What Exactly Is Crushed Stone?Planning for Your Shed FoundationGravel Pad MaterialsGathering Materials and ToolsMaterialsFind the Tools That You Will NeedRent Tools That You Will NeedHow to Lay Gravel Shed FoundationWhat are Options for Building Gravel BaseGravel Pad in Box1. Prepare Construction Site2. Digging Out3. Build the Frame for Gravel Pad4. Drainage Tile5. Lay Landscaping Fabric6. Pour and Compact the Gravel7. Check for LevelGravel Pad without Box1. Prepare Construction Site2. Shed Pad Preparation3. Build the Gravel Base4. Grade the areaWhat does it Cost to Install Gravel Pad?Anchoring the ShedNotes and TipsConclusion

A gravel shed foundation, or pad is a non-permanent stable structure on which to place or build a shed. It supports your shed on a solid ground level or near ground level pad similar to a concrete pad.

The size of the shed determines the size of the gravel pad, which also determines to cost of materials. The gravel pad should extend a foot or two beyond the sides of your shed too. Gravel pads are best for flat or near flat locations, but retaining walls can help level almost any location.

Check with your local building department to make sure your project meets local requirements. Also, give your local utilities a call too before you put a shovel in the ground and through your phone or cable line. Better safe than sorry.

The type of soil in your area determines its weight bearing properties. A dense gravel or dense sand and gravel soil can support more than 600 kPa or 12531 psf (pound per square foot). A compacted gravel base will provide similar support and stability if properly constructed and drained.

A gravel pad unboxed, boxed, or with retaining walls is an excellent DIY project. However, if you need to excavate a lot of material and construct large retaining walls, you may want to speak to a professional.

Saving a buck or two on something you feel you can do and have the time to do is great. Heavy equipment rental and retaining wall construction may make the professional a better deal though and often includes a warranty.

Most people refer to crushed stone and gravel as if they were the same; they are not. Gravel is a naturally eroded material and crushed stone is just that, mechanically crushed stone or rock. They even have different uses.

Gravel is rounded smooth stones of different sizes and colors found in riverbeds or ancient glacial deposits. It is often comprised of different types of rock material and comes in sizes ranging from to 2 and up to 20 or more inches.

It is used for decorative garden beds, walkways, landscaping, and drainage projects. The smooth rounded stones permit moisture to pass through the gaps between the stones; which also make it difficult to compact.

When choosing a suitable site for your gravel shed foundation consider the slope, drainage requirements, solar gain, and how firm the ground is. You also need to have enough space for the foundation and to be able to build or place your shed.

The best material to use for a gravel pad is crushed stone mixed with finer crushed material and dust. It compacts well and makes a permeable solid stable base with the finer material filling in any airspace. It is often known as crush and run or crusher-run gravel.

Different gravel companies use different numbers or grades to identify gravel size and composition. One company may call it 21-A while another refers to the same product as #411. Check the companys website or call and ask.

Dont use crushed stone that has been cleaned or washed and sorted or graded so it has no fine materials, it wont pack well. It will shift and move around as you try to compact it. The larger the stone material, the more likely it will sink too.

Weed barrier comes in rolls or folded sheets. It is water permeable to allow water through but stops the weeds from coming up through. Youll need enough to cover the full area covered by the gravel pad.

A gravel shed foundation can be built within a pressure treated wood frame or box or without a box on flat ground. The boxed pad, or retaining wall pad, can be used on the flat ground or to create a level base on uneven terrain.

A gravel pad in a pressure treated 4x4 or 6x6 frame or box is also known as a retaining wall pad or a timber frame pad. The retaining wall can hold the ground away from the pad, or keep the gravel foundation in place if the ground is sloped underneath it.

The cost of the pressure treated 44 or 66 timbers for the frame will depend on the perimeter of the gravel foundation, and the elevation due to the slope. A 12 foot 44 is about $20, a 12 foot 66 around $50, and a 16 foot 66 is between $60 and $70. Check with your local lumber store for the best prices.

rebar is sold by the foot in some stores and by the length in others. The longer the length the less the cost per foot, a 10-foot length is about $6. Buy longer pieces and cut with hack-saw or cut-off grinder.

The potential cost for an 11ft x 15ft gravel pad for an 8ft x 12ft shed could be 15ft x 11ft = 165 sq ft divided by 100 = 1.65 cubic yards of stone for every 2.5 = 3.96 cubic yards for a 6 inch thick gravel pad x $40 = approximately $160.00

Youve put time, sweat and money into building a stable foundation for your shed; a little bit more to protect your shed wont hurt. The size of your shed will determine how many anchors you need, and what type of anchor system is best.

A gravel shed foundation may be an easy foundation to build, but its a lot of grunt work too. Whether a free form or timber-framed pad, it must be compacted and as close to level as possible. If its not level, it will fail and damage your shed.

how to build a small jaw crusher?

how to build a small jaw crusher?

The primary jaw crusher is typically of the square opening design, and the secondary jaw crusher is of the rectangular opening design. Jaw crusher reduces the size of the rocks or ore by placing the rock into compression. The jaw crusher machine adopts a single sleeve type with an asymmetrical deep crushing chamber, which is easy to adjust and easier to implement in the crushing process. The jaw crusher is designed by using the jaw crusher plates, which is used to break the different types stones into small pieces because these plates have done most of the work in the system. Jaw crusher plates are playing an important role in the jaw crusher. This curved jaw design has a high production capacity. To improve the flexibility, our products offer high strength and lightweight modes for mobile applications. In conclusion, the machine has a wide range of types, which offer the customers the high productivity and low cost.

If you want to customize the design structure, you can easily customize it by meet customers requirements. A fixed jaw board, mounted in a V alignment is the stationary breaking surface, while the movable jaw exerts a force on the rock by forcing it against the stationary plate. The crushing process that the large stone becomes a small stone is called the primary crusher. Jaw crusher has many kinds of structures while their working principles are similar. The angle between the fixed jaw and moving jaw becomes smaller when the moving jaw runs down, then the materials are crushed into pieces. Jaw crushers are used as both primary jaw crusher and secondary jaw crusher. The jaw crusher has many kinds of structures while their working principles are similar. You can get more info about the work of jaw crusher from these principles before using the jaw crusher.

The working line of moving jaw crushing plant is short, different crushing equipment is installed on independent removable chassis, the wheelbase is short, the turning radius is small, and it can travel flexibly in ordinary highway and operation area. To reduce the material transportation cost, the material can be processed in the field, and the material does not have to be removed from the site for reprocessing, which greatly reduces the transportation cost of the material. These crusher plants are flexible combination, strong adaptability.

According to different crushing process requirements, it can be composed of first crushing and then screening, or first screening and then crushing process, which can be combined into coarse crushing, fine crushing and screening system according to the actual demand, and can also be combined into coarse, medium and fine crushing screening system, and can also run independently, which has great flexibility. The process can be divided into three stages according to the requirements of different crushing technology, and it can also be divided into first crushing and then crushing process, which can also be combined into two stages of crushing and screening system according to the actual demand.

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