home | coal mining in leicestershire

home | coal mining in leicestershire

We are raising money for the National Mining Memorial to have a Plaque placed on the memorial dedicated to Leicestershire, Derbyshire, Warwickshire, Kent and Lancashire Miners, women and children who worked down the pits over the last hundreds of years.

Coal Mining in Leicestershire wants to spread our message of keeping Leicestershire Coal Miningheritage alive through pictures, words and exhibitions to learn from our past by talking about this in the present, so we can move forward and be inspired for our future.

teck resources limited

teck resources limited

Copper is an essential part of peoples lives. Today, copper is the material of choice for powering our modern world as a vital component in everything from power generation and hybrid vehicles to computers and smartphones.

Energy is essential to our lives. We all rely on energyto keep the lights on, to get to work, or to heat or cool our homes. As populations around the globe particularly in developing nations grow and become increasingly urbanized, the demand for energy is increasing.

Zinc protects steel by improving its durability. The primary uses of zinc are for galvanizing steel to protect against weather and corrosion, producing brass and bronze, and in die-casting to produce a wide range of metal products. When added to fertilizers, zinc can increase crop yields and crop quality. And, as an essential nutrient in human development and disease prevention, zinc saves lives.

Steelmaking coal is an essential ingredient in the production of steel. Also called metallurgical or coking coal, it is a necessary ingredient in producing steel for building infrastructure such as rail, bridges and schools improving the quality of life for people around the world. Steel and steelmaking coal are required for everything from clean energy projects like wind or solar power to transportation like rapid transit, buses and vehicles.

Copper is an essential part of peoples lives. Today, copper is the material of choice for powering our modern world as a vital component in everything from power generation and hybrid vehicles to computers and smartphones.

Energy is essential to our lives. We all rely on energyto keep the lights on, to get to work, or to heat or cool our homes. As populations around the globe particularly in developing nations grow and become increasingly urbanized, the demand for energy is increasing.

Zinc protects steel by improving its durability. The primary uses of zinc are for galvanizing steel to protect against weather and corrosion, producing brass and bronze, and in die-casting to produce a wide range of metal products. When added to fertilizers, zinc can increase crop yields and crop quality. And, as an essential nutrient in human development and disease prevention, zinc saves lives.

Steelmaking coal is an essential ingredient in the production of steel. Also called metallurgical or coking coal, it is a necessary ingredient in producing steel for building infrastructure such as rail, bridges and schools improving the quality of life for people around the world. Steel and steelmaking coal are required for everything from clean energy projects like wind or solar power to transportation like rapid transit, buses and vehicles.

Teck is committed to responsible resource development. We are focused on operating sustainably, ensuring the health and safety of our people, and building strong relationships with communities. Our comprehensive sustainability strategy has goals that stretch through to 2050 in eight strategic themes:

As one of Canadas leading mining companies, Teck is committed to responsible mining and mineral development with major business units focused on copper, zinc, and steelmaking coal, as well as investments in energy assets.

the latest coal news & leading coal magazine | world coal

the latest coal news & leading coal magazine | world coal

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AECI Australia Pty Ltd has been awarded a further 5-year contract extension by Thiess Pty Ltd for the supply of bulk emulsion explosives, initiating systems and related services to mines in Queensland and New South Wales, Australia.

MACH Energy has notified Thiess of its intention to enter into exclusive negotiations to finalise the terms with the view to execute a mining services contract for the Mount Pleasant Operation in New South Wales, Australia.

jms mining pvt ltd | welcome to jms

jms mining pvt ltd | welcome to jms

The information contained in this website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by www.jmsmining.com, a property of JMS Mining Private Limited (JMS). While we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. JMS gives no warranty or representation regarding any content provided through this website and disclaims its liabilities in respect thereof. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk and responsibility.

JMS shall not be liable for users of website contents, who, by using the same, expressly agree to indemnify JMS against any and all claims, expenses, damages and liabilities arising out of use of website contents by such user, including any and all direct, indirect, incidental, special or consequential damages. JMS does not give any warranty that the contents of the website are free from infection by viruses or anything else which has contaminating or destructive properties.

You are not authorized to modify, publish, transmit, transfer, sell, reproduce, create derivative work from, distribute, repost, perform, display or in any way commercially exploit any of the content of this site or any downloads to others without the express written consent of JMS. Also, you are not authorized to copy and distribute this information on any other server, or modify or reuse text or graphics on this or any another system.

All material provided in this site including this disclaimer are subject to Indian laws as prevailing from time to time. The courts in Kolkata have jurisdiction in relation to any claim or action arising out of, or in connection with this disclaimer.

JMS Mining Private Limited, hereafter referred as JMS, is the pioneer & market leader in implementation of Mass Production Technology in underground coal mining in India. We have implemented worlds latest technology continuous miner & bolter miner in this country. It has presence in major Underground coal mining clusters in the country. Coal India Ltd. and Singareni Collieries Company Ltd., Indias 1st and 2nd coal producing companies, are its esteemed clients.

We have introduced Bolter Miner first time in India. We have introduced system for Real Time Prediction of roof caving in developing operation. We maintain global safety standards in everyday activities at all places and levels. Our Life Cycle Management for underground mines is the best in its class. We manufacture support materials to maintain quality and in time availability of the same.

JMS offers multifarious and of superior quality mining services - Geo-technical investigations, mine planning and cost estimation, preparation of detailed project reports, mine operation, development of mines related infrastructures, life cycle management of equipment are major of them. Its strata control & monitoring system are of world class level. EHS Management is conducted as per global norms.

At JMS, the driving philosophy behind their service is quality begets quality. Thats why, the enterprise is driven exclusively by technically qualified people, minimum qualification being ITI. Talent, imbued with motivation and values, makes for efficiency, empowerment and leadership. Apart from a talented team, what sets JMS apart from the rest is its host of associations with global manufacturers and consultants. Our invaluable human resource, coupled with extensive safety measures and environmental policies, is integral to JMS steady rise in the nations energy sector.

Major Market Share holdings in Continuous Mining System, Bolter Minier and Mass Production Technology projects in India Pioneered the introduction of modern Life Cycle Management with component exchange... Winner of EHS award from CII on 2014 with Zero Harm systems and procedures and Lost Time Injury Frequency rate (LTIFR) of 0.34... We are the largest producer of coal from underground mines in India and now also in Open Cast Mining... Highest production in a day is 12803 te (31st March 2016) Highest production in a month is 302456 te (March 2016) Highest Production in a year is 2380789 te (FY 2015-16)... In house integrated training program from operators to project managers and roof bolting engineers... First CM in India (2002), still in operation over 11 years to original production targets following 2 major rebuilds....

coal mining | definition, history, types, & facts | britannica

coal mining | definition, history, types, & facts | britannica

Coal is the most abundant fossil fuel on Earth. Its predominant use has always been for producing heat energy. It was the basic energy source that fueled the Industrial Revolution of the 18th and 19th centuries, and the industrial growth of that era in turn supported the large-scale exploitation of coal deposits. Since the mid-20th century, coal has yielded its place to petroleum and natural gas as the principal energy supplier of the world. The mining of coal from surface and underground deposits today is a highly productive, mechanized operation.

There is archaeological evidence that coal was burned in funeral pyres during the Bronze Age, 3,000 to 4,000 years ago, in Wales. Aristotle mentions coal (combustible bodies) in his Meteorologica, and his pupil Theophrastus also records its use. The Romans in Britain burned coal before 400ce; cinders have been found among the ruins of Roman villas and towns and along the Roman wall, especially in Northumberland, near the outcrop of coal seams. The Hopi Indians of what is now the southwestern United States mined coal by picking and scraping and used it for heating, cooking, and in ceremonial chambers as early as the 12th century ce; in the 14th century they used it industrially in pottery making. Marco Polo reports its use as widespread in 13th-century China. The Domesday Book (1086), which recorded everything of economic value in England, does not mention coal. Londons first coal arrived by sea in 1228, from the areas of Fife and Northumberland, where lumps broken from submarine outcroppings and washed ashore by wave action were gathered by women and children. Thereafter, the name sea coal was applied to all bituminous coal in England. Later in the century, monks began to mine outcroppings in the north of England.

Except for the Chinese, who may have mined coal underground, all the early coal seams were worked from the surface, in fully exposed outcroppings. In the later Middle Ages, however, exhaustion of outcrop coal in many places forced a change from surface to underground, or shaft, mining. Early shaft mines were little more than wells widened as much as miners dared in the face of danger of collapse. Shafts were sunk on high ground, with aditsnear-horizontal tunnelsfor drainage driven into the side of the hill. In England some shallow mine shafts were exhausted as early as the 14th century, making it necessary to go deeper and expand mining at the shaft bottoms. These remained small operations; a record of 1684 shows 70 mines near Bristol, employing 123 workers. Greater depth created many problems. First, water could no longer simply be drained away. Crude methods were devised to lift it to the surface. A bucket-and-chain device was first powered by men and later by horses; a continuous belt of circular plates was drawn up through a pipe. Windmills were used for pumps. But shafts had to be restricted to depths of 90 to 105 metres (300 to 350 feet) and a mining radius of 180 metres. It was not until 1710 that the water problem was eased by Thomas Newcomens steam atmospheric engine, which supplied a cheap and reliable power source for a vertical reciprocating lift pump.

Raising the coal itself was another problem. Manpower, operating a windlass, was replaced by horsepower; and, as the shafts went deeper, more horses were added. At Whitehaven in 1801, coal was hoisted 180 metres by four horses at the rate of 4244 metric tons (4648 tons) in nine hours. The introduction of the steam engine to hoist coal was a major turning point for the industry. Small steam-powered windlasses were successfully tried out about 1770. About 1840 the first cage was used to hoist the loaded car; and from 1840 onward advances in coal-mining techniques were rapid.

The presence of noxious and flammable gases caused miners to recognize the critical importance of ventilation in coal mines from the earliest days. Natural ventilation was afforded by level drainage tunnels driven from the sloping surface to connect with the shaft. Surface stacks above the shaft increased the efficiency of ventilation; their use continued in small mines until the early 20th century. The most reliable method, before the introduction of fans, was the use of a furnace at the shaft bottom or on the surface. Despite the hazard of fire and explosion, there were still a large number of furnaces operating, at least in nongassy mines, in the early 20th century.

Open-flame illumination, however, was a much more common cause of explosions until the introduction of the Davy safety lamp (about 1815), in which the flame is enclosed in a double layer of wire gauze that prevents ignition of flammable gases in the air of the mine. Presence of strong air currents, however, made even the Davy lamp unsafe.

Rotary ventilating fans were introduced in mines in the 18th century. Originally of wood and powered by steam, they were improved throughout the 19th and 20th centuries by the introduction of steel blades, electric power, and aerodynamically efficient shapes for the blades.

Early European miners wedged coal out of the seam or broke it loose with a pick. After explosives were introduced, it was still necessary to undercut the coal seam with hand tools. The advent of steam, compressed air, and electricity brought relief from this hard, dangerous work. In 1868, after almost 100 years of trial and error, a commercially successful revolving-wheel cutter for undercutting the coal seam was introduced in England. This first powered cutting tool was soon improved by introduction of compressed air as a power source in place of steam. Later, electricity was used. The longwall cutter was introduced in 1891. Originally driven by compressed air and later electrified, it could begin at one end of a long face (the vertical, exposed cross section of a seam of coal) and cut continuously to the other.

The conventional mining techniques described above, made up of the cyclic operations of cutting, drilling, blasting, and loading, developed in association with room-and-pillar mining. The oldest of the basic underground methods, room-and-pillar mining grew naturally out of the need to recover more coal as mining operations became deeper and more expensive. During the late 1940s, conventional techniques began to be replaced by single machines, known as continuous miners, that broke off the coal from the seam and transferred it back to the haulage system. The Joy Ripper (1948) was the first continuous miner applicable to the room-and-pillar method.

The other principal method of modern mining, longwall mining, had been introduced as early as the 17th century and had found general use by the 19th century, but it had long been less productive than room-and-pillar mining. This began to change in the 1940s, when a continuous system involving the plow was developed by Wilhelm Loebbe of Germany. Pulled across the face of the coal and guided by a pipe on the face side of a segmented conveyor, the plow carved a gash off the bottom of the seam. The conveyor snaked against the face behind the advancing plow to catch the coal that chipped off from above the gash. Substantially reducing the labour required at the coal face (except that needed to install roof support), the Loebbe system quickly became popular in Germany, France, and the Low Countries.

The plow itself had limited application in British mines, but the power-advanced segmented conveyor became a fundamental part of equipment there, and in 1952 a simple continuous machine called the shearer was introduced. Pulled along the face astride the conveyor, the shearer bore a series of disks fitted with picks on their perimeters and mounted on a shaft perpendicular to the face. The revolving disks cut a slice from the coal face as the machine was pulled along, and a plow behind the machine cleaned up any coal that dropped between the face and the conveyor.

The technique of supporting the roof by rock bolting became common in the late 1940s and did much to provide an unobstructed working area for room-and-pillar mining, but it was a laborious and slow operation that prevented longwall mining from realizing its potential. In the late 1950s, however, powered, self-advancing roof supports were introduced by the British. Individually or in groups, these supports, attached to the conveyor, could be hydraulically lowered, advanced, and reset against the roof, thus providing a prop-free area for equipment (between the coal face and the first row of jacks) and a canopied pathway for miners (between the first and second rows of jacks).

In the first shaft mines, coal was loaded into baskets that were carried on the backs of men or women or loaded on wooden sledges or trams that were then pushed or hauled through the main haulage roadway to the shaft bottom to be hung on hoisting ropes or chains. In drift and slope mines, the coal was brought directly to the surface by these and similar methods. Sledges were pulled first by men and later by animals, including mules, horses, oxen, and even dogs and goats.

Steam locomotives designed by Richard Trevithick were used in the fields of South Wales and Tyne and later in Pennsylvania and West Virginia, but they created too much smoke. Compressed-air locomotives, which appeared in the 1880s, proved expensive to operate. Electric locomotives, introduced in 1887, rapidly became popular, but mules and horses were still working in some mines as late as the 1940s.

The loading by hand of broken coal into railcars was made obsolete early in the 20th century by mobile loaders. The Stanley Header, the first coal-loading machine used in the United States, was developed in England and tested in Colorado in 1888. Others were developed, but few progressed beyond the prototype stage until the Joy machine was introduced in 1914. Employing the gathering-arm principle, the Joy machine provided the pattern for future successful mobile loaders. After the introduction in 1938 of electric-powered, rubber-tired shuttle cars designed to carry coal from the loading machine to the elevator, mobile loading and haulage rapidly supplanted track haulage at the face of room-and-pillar mines.

In 1924 a conveyor belt was successfully used in an anthracite mine in central Pennsylvania to carry coal from a group of room conveyors to a string of cars at the mine entry. By the 1960s belts had almost completely replaced railcars for intermediate haulage.

The history of coal preparation begins in the 19th century, with the adaptation of mineral-processing methods used for enriching metallic ores from their associated impurities. In the early years, larger pieces of coal were simply handpicked from pieces composed predominantly of mineral matter. Washing with mechanical devices to separate the coal from associated rocks on the basis of their density differences began during the 1840s.

At first, coal preparation was necessitated by the demand for higher heating values; another demand was for such special purposes as metallurgical coke for steelmaking. In recent years, as concern has grown over the emission of sulfur dioxide in the flue gases of power plants, coal preparation has taken on greater importance as a measure to remove atmospheric pollutants.

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