bond work index - an overview | sciencedirect topics

bond work index - an overview | sciencedirect topics

The Bond work index is not solely a material constant but is influenced by the grinding conditions. For example, the finer the grind size desired, the higher is the kWh/t required to grind to that size. Magdalinovic [38] measured the Bond work index of three ore types using different test screen sizes. He produced a correlation between the mass of test screen undersize per revolution, G, and the square root of the test screen size, D:

The constant K2 is also dependent on ore type and ranged from 1.4 to 1.5. A regression of Magdalinovics data including the feed 80% passing size gives an average value of 1.485 for K2. If we extend this relationship to any sample of screened material then this gives an approximate estimate of the 80% passing size as 67.3% of the top size. This compares with a value of 66.7% of the 99% passing size obtained from data in Table3.3.

Using Magdalinovics method, from the results of a Bond work index test at a single test screen size, the constants K1 and K2 can be calculated and from these values, the work index at any test screen size can be estimated.

An alternative approach to determine the effect of closing screen size on the Bond ball mill work index (BWi), in the absence of extensive test work, is to use computer simulation. The batch grinding process has been modelled using the sizemass balance approach (Austin [37], Chapter11) and if we can do this, then we can effectively simulate the Bond ball mill work index test. Yan and Eaton [39] measured the selection function and breakage distribution parameters for the Austin grinding model and demonstrated the BWi simulation with soft and medium/hard ore samples. The measured BWi was 14.0 and 6.6kWh/t for the medium/hard and soft ore, respectively, at a closing screen size of 106 m compared with the simulated values of 13.2 and 5.6kWh/t.

The ability to simulate the Bond work index test also allows examination of truncated ball mill feed size distributions on the work index. For grinding circuits where the feed to a ballmill is sent directly to the classifier and the cyclone underflow feeds the ball mill (see Figure3.10), a question arises as to whether this practice will alter the ball mill work index (BWi) of the material being ground and hence have an impact on the energy used in the mill for grinding. Some might conclude that a higher percentage of coarse material in the mill feed will increase the amount of material that needs to be ground to produce the end product and hence it will affect the BWi. Others, in the absence of contrary evidence, assume that there is no change in the work index. Figure3.11 shows the typical circuit represented by the standard Bond work index correlation and Figure3.10 represents the scalped or truncated feed case.

The procedure for the work index test bases the BWi value on the calculation of new fines generated in the test. This means that the fraction of fines in the feed should not influence the test result significantly, if at all. For example, for a sample with 20% of 300 m material in the feed, if this is not scalped out of the fresh feed, then the mill charge, at 250% circulating load will contain 0.2/3.5 or 5.7% of 300 m in the mill charge compared with 0% for a scalped fresh feed, at a closing screen of 300 m. This should not have a great influence on the production of new fines unless the test was carried out in a wet environment and the fines contained a high percentage of clays to affect the viscosity of the grind environment. Thus for a Bond test (dry test), the difference between the scalped and unscalped BWi result is expected to be minor. In a plant operation where the environment is wet and clays are present, a different result may be observed.

Tests carried out to confirm this have clouded the water a little. Three rock types were tested with scalped and unscalped feeds with two samples showing higher BWi values for the scalped ore and the other sample showing a lower value [40].

In the work index test simulation, it is easy to change the closing screen size to examine the effect on the BWi. The results of such a simulation are shown in Figure3.12 where the simulated test was performed at different closing screen sizes and different scalping sizes. This shows that for scalping sizes at or below the closing screen size of the test, the BWi values are not affected. The scalping size of zero refers to the un-scalped mill feed. For scalped screen sizes above the closing screen size, the BWi values start to increase. The increase in BWi is more pronounced at the larger closing screen sizes. At a closing screen size of 300 m and a scalped size of 600 m, the increase in BWi is 4%.

Another outcome of the simulation is the effect of the closing screen size on the work index. As the closing size decreases, the ore must be ground finer, using more energy and producing a higher work index. Further simulations at even larger closing screen sizes show the BWi to increase. This dip in BWi with closing screen size has been observed experimentally, as shown in Figure3.13, with the minimum in BWi occurring at different closing screen sizes for different rock types [41,42].

Bond impact crushability work index (CWi) (Bond, 1963) results reported for iron ores vary from hard iron ore (17.7kWh/t) to medium hardness iron ore (11.3kWh/t) and friable iron ore (6.3kWh/t) (Table 2.11; Clout et al., 2007). The CWi for hard iron ores typically overlaps with those reported for BIF (taconite) iron ores while the range in values in Table 2.11 covers that for different types of iron ores and materials reported earlier by Bond (1963), with some relevant data in Table 2.12.

The most widely used parameter to measure ore hardness is the Bond work index Wi. Calculations involving Bonds work index are generally divided into steps with a different Wi determination for each size class. The low energy crushing work index laboratory test is conducted on ore specimens larger than 50mm, determining the crushing work index (WiC, CWi or IWi (impact work index)). The rod mill work index laboratory test is conducted by grinding an ore sample prepared to 80% passing 12.7mm ( inch, the original test being developed in imperial units) to a product size of approximately 1mm (in the original and still the standard, 14 mesh; see Chapter 4 for definition of mesh), thus determining the rod mill work index (WiR or RWi). The ball mill work index laboratory test is conducted by grinding an ore sample prepared to 100% passing 3.36mm (6 mesh) to product size in the range of 45-150m (325-100 mesh), thus determining the ball mill work index (WiB or BWi). The work index calculations across a narrow size range are conducted using the appropriate laboratory work index determination for the material size of interest, or by chaining individual work index calculations using multiple laboratory work index determinations across a wide range of particle size.

To give a sense of the magnitude, Table 5.1 lists Bond work indices for a selection of materials. For preliminary design purposes such reference data are of some guide but measured values are required at the more advanced design stage.

A major use of the Bond model is to select the size of tumbling mill for a given duty. (An example calculation is given in Chapter 7.) A variety of correction factors (EF) have been developed to adapt the Bond formula to situations not included in the original calibration set and to account for relative efficiency differences in certain comminution machines (Rowland, 1988). Most relevant are the EF4 factor for coarse feed and the EF5 factor for fine grinding that attempt to compensate for sizes ranges beyond the bulk of the original calibration data set (Bond, 1985).

The standard Bond tumbling mill tests are time-consuming, requiring locked-cycle testing. Smith and Lee (1968) used batch-type tests to arrive at the work index; however, the grindability of highly heterogeneous ores cannot be well reproduced by batch testing.

Berry and Bruce (1966) developed a comparative method of determining the hardness of an ore. The method requires the use of a reference ore of known work index. The reference ore is ground for a certain time (T) in a laboratory tumbling mill and an identical weight of the test ore is then ground for the same time. Since the power input to the mill is constant (P), the energy input (E=PT) is the same for both reference and test ore. If r is the reference ore and t the ore under test, then we can write from Bonds Eq. (5.4):

Work indices have been obtained from grindability tests on different sizes of several types of equipment, using identical feed materials (Lowrison, 1974). The values of work indices obtained are indications of the efficiencies of the machines. Thus, the equipment having the highest indices, and hence the largest energy consumers, are found to be jaw and gyratory crushers and tumbling mills; intermediate consumers are impact crushers and vibration mills, and roll crushers are the smallest consumers. The smallest consumers of energy are those machines that apply a steady, continuous, compressive stress on the material.

A class of comminution equipment that does not conform to the assumption that the particle size distributions of a feed and product stream are self-similar includes autogenous mills (AG), semi-autogenous (SAG) mills and high pressure grinding rolls (HPGR). Modeling these machines with energy-based methods requires either recalibrating equations (in the case of the Bond series) or developing entirely new tests that are not confused by the non-standard particle size distributions.

Variability samples must be tested for the relevant metallurgical parameters. Ball mill design requires a Bond work index, BWi, for ball mills at the correct passing size; SAG mill design requires an appropriate SAG test, for example, SPI (Chapter 5). Flotation design needs a valid measure of kinetics for each sample, including the maximum attainable recovery and rate constants for each mineral (Chapter 12). Take care to avoid unnecessary testing for inappropriate parameters, saving the available funds for more variability samples rather than more tests on few samples. Remember that it must be possible to use the measured values for the samples to estimate the metallurgical parameters for the mine blocks in order to describe the ore body, and these estimates will be used in process models to forecast results for the plant. Always include some basic mineralogical examination of each sample.

The expression for computing the power consumption (P) derived theoretically by Rose and English [9] involved the knowledge of Bonds work index (Wi). To evaluate the work index they considered the maximum size in the feed and also the maximum size of particles in the discharge from the crusher. To determine the size through which 80% of the feed passed, they considered a large database relating the maximum particle size and the undersize. From the relation it was concluded that F80 was approximately equal to 0.7 times the largest size of particle. Taking the largest size of the particle that should be charged to a jaw crusher as 0.9 times the gape, F80 was written as

Also, to establish the P80 from the largest product size, Rose and English considered that the largest particle size discharged from the bottom of the crusher would occur at the maximum open set position and hence

For operating a jaw crusher it is necessary to know the maximum power required consistently with the reduction ratio and the gape and closed side settings. The maximum power drawn in a system will occur at the critical speed. Thus for maximum power, Q in Equation (4.51) is replaced with QM from Equation (4.19) to give

The largest size of ore pieces mined measured 560mm (average) and the smallest sizes averaged 160mm. The density of the ore was 2.8t/m3. The ore had to be crushed in a C-63 type jaw crusher 630 440. At a reduction ratio of 4, 18% of the ore was below the maximum size required. Determine:1.the maximum operating capacity of the crusher,2.the optimum speed at which it should be operated.

Finally, a look should be taken at coal elasticity, hardness and strength. However, a particular matter of importance which arises from those consideration is the ease of coal grinding, an important step in whatever coal preparation efforts for further processing. The more fundamental material properties are covered reasonably by Berkowitz (1994), so the discussion here will be limited to coal grindability. For that purpose, use is made of two different indices, both determined experimentally with the material to be ground. One is the Hardgrove grindability index and the other the Bond work index.

The Hardgrove index is determined using the ASTM method D 40971. It involves grinding 50g of the material, e.g. coal, of specified size (1630 mesh cut) in a specified ball-and-race mill for 60 revolutions. The amount of 200 mesh material is measured (w grams) and the index is defined as I = 13+ 6.93w. Thus, the higher the index, the easier is the grinding task. This method loosely assumes that the specific energy consumed is proportional to the new surface generated, following the concept of Rittingers law of comminution.

Berkowitz (1994 p.96) gives a generalized variation of the Hardgrove index with coal rank. According to the variation, anthracites are hard to grind, bituminous coals the easiest, and the subbituminous more difficult, with lignites down to the same low index level as anthracites. It is suggested that the decrease in the index below daf coal of 85% is caused by plastic deformation and aggregation of the softer coal particles, hence reducing the 200 mesh fraction generated by the grinding test.

The Bond work index (Bond, 1960) is based on Bonds law, which states that the energy consumed is proportional to the 1.5 power of particle size rather than the square of Rittingers law. Accordingly, the energy consumed in reducing the particle size from xF to xp (both measured as 80% undersize) is given by

We should note that the higher the value of the work index, the more difficult it is to grind the material. A compilation of data is available, for example, in Perrys Chemical Engineers Handbook (Perry et al., 1984). For coal, one average value is given, with Ei = 11.37 for = 1.63. Bonds law is useful because of the extensive comparative database.

Interestingly, Hukki (1961) offers a Solomonic settlement between the different grinding theories (rather than laws). A great deal of additional material related to grinding, or size reduction, comminution, is available in handbooks, e.g. by Prasher (1987) and research publications in journals such as Powder Technology. A very brief overview of grinding equipment is given in Section 1.5.3.

Rock fragmentation is a consequence of unstable extension of multiple cracks. Theoretically, rock fragmentation is also a facture mechanics problem. Two major differences between rock fracture and rock fragmentation are that (1) rock fragmentation deals with many cracks, but rock fracture deals with only one or a few, and (2) rock fragmentation concerns the size distribution of the fragments produced, but rock fracture does not. There are two important factors in rock fragmentation: (1) total energy consumed and (2) size distribution of fragments. In a study on crushing and grinding, fracture toughness has been taken as a key index similar to the Bond Work Index. Due to many cracks dealt with, rock fragmentation is a very complicated and difficult fracture problem. To achieve a good fragmentation, we need to know how the energy is distributed, which factors influence energy distribution, what is the size distribution, and so on. In practice such as mining and quarrying, it is of importance to predict and examine size distribution so as to make fragmentation optimized by modifying the blast plan or changing the fragmentation system. About size distribution, there are a number of distribution functions such as Weibulls distribution function [11], Cunninghams Kuz-Ram model [12], and the Swebrec function [13]. In engineering practice, how to develop a feasible and simple method to judge rock fragmentation in the field is still a challenging but significant job and will be in the future.

Although the fracture toughness of a rock is very important in rock fracture, the strengths of the rock are also useful in rock engineering. In the following we will see that the strengths and fracture toughness of a rock have a certain relation with each other, partly because of a similar mechanism in the micro-scale failure.

Bong's Work Index is used in Bong's law of comminution energy. It states that the total work useful in breakage is inversely proportional to the length of the formed crack tips and directly proportional to the square root of the formed surface:

where W is the specific energy expenditure in kilowatt-hours per ton and dp and df are the particle size in microns at which 80% of the corresponding product and feed passes through the sieve; CB is a constant depending on the characteristics of materials; and Sp and Sf are the specific surface areas of product and initial feed, respectively. Wi is called Bond's Work Index in kilowatt-hours per ton. It is given by the empirical equation:

where P1 is the sieve opening in microns for the grindability test, Gb.p. (g/rev) is the ball mill grindability, dp is the product particle size in microns (80% of product finer than size P1 passes) and df is the initial feed size in microns (80% of feed passes). A standard ball mill is 305mm in internal diameter and 305mm in internal length charged with 285 balls, as tabulated in Table 2.1. The lowest limit of the total mass of balls is 19.5Kg. The mill is rotated at 70 rev/min. The process is continued until the net mass of undersize produced by revolution becomes a constant Gb.p in the above equation.

To investigate the influence of the coal type on the stampability factor K, stamping tests with eight different coals (C1C8 in Table11.1) were carried out, using the Hardgrove grindability index (HGI) as a measure for the material dependency. The grindability is broadly defined as the response of a material to grinding effort. It can be interpreted as the resistance of the material against particularization. It is not an absolutely measurable physical property of the material. Generally, grindability can be determined either based on product constant fineness method (Bond work index Wi) or on constant useful grinding work method (HGI). The correlation between HGI and Wi can be described by the formula (11.5):

HGI is influenced by the petrographic composition of coal. HGI was developed to find a relationship between petrographic properties and strength of coal particles thus aiming to interpret the coking behavior of coals (Hardgrove 1932). HGI correlates to VM content, and the relationship is empirically specified for most of the hard coals and given with VM from 10% to 38% (db) by Eqs. (11.6) and (11.7):

For the execution of each test, further coal property parameters, particle size distribution and moisture content, as well as the height of fall of the stamp and the number of stamping steps were kept constant, so that the only parameter varied was the coal rank characterized by HGI.

The obtained data of each test was analyzed as described above to calculate the stampability factor K. A higher value for the HGI is equivalent to a lower resistance to stamping, i.e., a better stampability. The determined values of the stampability factor K are plotted against HGI in Fig.11.12.

bauxite grinding mill & bauxite powder making

bauxite grinding mill & bauxite powder making

Bauxite is also known as alumina bauxite, the main component is alumina oxide which is hydrated alumina containing impurities, is an earthy mineral; white or gray, shows in brownish yellow or pink color because of iron contained. Density is 3.9~4g/cm3, hardness 1-3, opaque and brittle; insoluble in water, soluble in sulfuric acid and sodium hydroxide solution.

Bauxite is also known as alumina bauxite, the main component is alumina oxide which is hydrated alumina containing impurities, is an earthy mineral; white or gray, shows in brownish yellow or pink color because of iron contained. Density is 3.9~4g/cm3, hardness 1-3, opaque and brittle; insoluble in water, soluble in sulfuric acid and sodium hydroxide solution.

Bauxite is rich in resources, needed for many industries; therefore, it is a very popular non-metallic material, and the reason why it has been generally welcomed, mainly because it is very promising in the industrial field.

4. Aluminosilicate refractory fibers. With several advantages such as light weight, high temperature resistance, good thermal stability, low thermal conductivity, small heat capacity and resistance to mechanical vibration and so on. Can be used in iron and steel, nonferrous metallurgy, electronics, petroleum, chemical, aerospace, nuclear, national defense and other industries.

Bauxite ingredient analysis sheet Al2O3SiO2Fe2O3TiO2H2Oas the main componentSCaOMgOK2ONa2OCO2MnO2GaGeNbTaTRCoZrVPCrNi etc >95% Minor component Trace elements Bauxite powder making model selection program SpecificationFine powder processing80-400meshUltrafine powder deep processing600-2000mesh Equipment selection program Vertical grinding mill and raymond grinding mill

Qualified powder will flow with the air and be collected in the collector, then the finished powder will be transported to the product storage bin through discharge port. Lastly, the powder will be loaded by tank car or packed by packing machine.

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impact crusher - an overview | sciencedirect topics

impact crusher - an overview | sciencedirect topics

The impact crusher (typically PE series) is widely used and of high production efficiency and good safety performance. The finished product is of cube shape and the tension force and crack is avoided. Compared with hammer crusher, the impact crusher is able to fully utilize the high-speed impact energy of entire rotor. However, due to the crushing board that is easy to wear, it is also limited in the hard material crushing. The impact crusher is commonly used for the crushing of limestone, coal, calcium carbide, quartz, dolomite, iron pyrites, gypsum, and chemical raw materials of medium hardness. Effect of process conditions on the production capacity of crushed materials is listed in Table8.10.

Depending on the size of the debris, it may either be ready to enter the recycling process or need to be broken down to obtain a product with workable particle sizes, in which case hydraulic breakers mounted on tracked or wheeled excavators are used. In either case, manual sorting of large pieces of steel, wood, plastics and paper may be required, to minimise the degree of contamination of the final product.

The three types of crushers most commonly used for crushing CDW materials are the jaw crusher, the impact crusher and the gyratory crusher (Figure 4.4). A jaw crusher consists of two plates, with one oscillating back and forth against the other at a fixed angle (Figure 4.4(a)) and it is the most widely used in primary crushing stages (Behera etal., 2014). The jaw crusher can withstand large and hard-to-break pieces of reinforced concrete, which would probably cause the other crushing machines to break down. Therefore, the material is initially reduced in jaw crushers before going through any other crushing operation. The particle size reduction depends on the maximum and minimum size of the gap at the plates (Hansen, 2004).

An impact crusher breaks the CDW materials by striking them with a high-speed rotating impact, which imparts a shearing force on the debris (Figure 4.4(b)). Upon reaching the rotor, the debris is caught by steel teeth or hard blades attached to the rotor. These hurl the materials against the breaker plate, smashing them into smaller particle sizes. Impact crushers provide better grain-size distribution of RA for road construction purposes, and they are less sensitive to material that cannot be crushed, such as steel reinforcement.

Generally, jaw and impact crushers exhibit a large reduction factor, defined as the ratio of the particle size of the input to that of the output material. A jaw crusher crushes only a small proportion of the original aggregate particles but an impact crusher crushes mortar and aggregate particles alike and thus generates a higher amount of fine material (OMahony, 1990).

Gyratory crushers work on the same principle as cone crushers (Figure 4.4(c)). These have a gyratory motion driven by an eccentric wheel. These machines will not accept materials with a large particle size and therefore only jaw or impact crushers should be considered as primary crushers. Gyratory and cone crushers are likely to become jammed by fragments that are too large or too heavy. It is recommended that wood and steel be removed as much as possible before dumping CDW into these crushers. Gyratory and cone crushers have advantages such as relatively low energy consumption, a reasonable amount of control over the particle size of the material and production of low amounts of fine particles (Hansen, 2004).

For better control of the aggregate particle size distribution, it is recommended that the CDW should be processed in at least two crushing stages. First, the demolition methodologies used on-site should be able to reduce individual pieces of debris to a size that the primary crusher in the recycling plant can take. This size depends on the opening feed of the primary crusher, which is normally bigger for large stationary plants than for mobile plants. Therefore, the recycling of CDW materials requires careful planning and communication between all parties involved.

A large proportion of the product from the primary crusher can result in small granules with a particle size distribution that may not satisfy the requirements laid down by the customer after having gone through the other crushing stages. Therefore, it should be possible to adjust the opening feed size of the primary crusher, implying that the secondary crusher should have a relatively large capacity. This will allow maximisation of coarse RA production (e.g., the feed size of the primary crusher should be set to reduce material to the largest size that will fit the secondary crusher).

The choice of using multiple crushing stages mainly depends on the desired quality of the final product and the ratio of the amounts of coarse and fine fractions (Yanagi etal., 1998; Nagataki and Iida, 2001; Nagataki etal., 2004; Dosho etal., 1998; Gokce etal., 2011). When recycling concrete, a greater number of crushing processes produces a more spherical material with lower adhered mortar content (Pedro etal., 2015), thus providing a superior quality of material to work with (Lotfi etal., 2017). However, the use of several crushing stages has some negative consequences as well; in addition to costing more, the final product may contain a greater proportion of finer fractions, which may not always be a suitable material.

Reduction of the broken rock material, or oversized gravel material, to an aggregate-sized product is achieved by various types of mechanical crusher. These operations may involve primary, secondary and even sometimes tertiary phases of crushing. There are many different types of crusher, such as jaw, gyratory, cone (or disc) and impact crushers (Fig. 15.9), each of which has various advantages and disadvantages according to the properties of the material being crushed and the required shape of the aggregate particles produced.

Fig. 15.9. Diagrams to illustrate the basic actions of some types of crusher: solid shading highlights the hardened wear-resistant elements. (A) Single-toggle jaw crusher, (B) disc or gyrosphere crusher, (C) gyratory crusher and (D) impact crusher.

It is common, but not invariable, for jaw or gyratory crushers to be utilised for primary crushing of large raw feed, and for cone crushers or impact breakers to be used for secondary reduction to the final aggregate sizes. The impact crushing machines can be particularly useful for producing acceptable particle shapes (Section 15.5.3) from difficult materials, which might otherwise produce unduly flaky or elongated particles, but they may be vulnerable to abrasive wear and have traditionally been used mostly for crushing limestone.

Reduction of the broken rock material, or oversized gravel material, to an aggregate-sized product is achieved by various types of mechanical crusher. These operations may involve primary, secondary and even sometimes tertiary phases of crushing. There are many different types of crusher, such as jaw, gyratory, cone (or disc) and impact crushers (Figure 16.8), each of which has various advantages and disadvantages according to the properties of the material being crushed and the required shape of the aggregate particles produced.

Fig. 16.8. Diagrams to illustrate the basic actions of some types of crusher: solid shading highlights the hardened wear-resistant elements (redrawn, adapted and modified from Ref. 39). (a) Single-toggle jaw crusher, (b) disc or gyrosphere crusher, (c) gyratory crusher, and (d) impact crusher.

It is common, but not invariable, for jaw or gyratory crushers to be utilised for primary crushing of large raw feed, and for cone crushers or impact breakers to be used for secondary reduction to the final aggregate sizes. The impact crushing machines can be particularly useful for producing acceptable particle shapes (section 16.5.3) from difficult materials, which might otherwise produce unduly flaky or elongated particles, but they may be vulnerable to abrasive wear and have traditionally been used mostly for crushing limestone.

The main sources of RA are either from construction and ready mixed concrete sites, demolition sites or from roads. The demolition sites produce a heterogeneous material, whereas ready mixed concrete or prefabricated concrete plants produce a more homogeneous material. RAs are mainly produced in fixed crushing plant around big cities where CDWs are available. However, for roads and to reduce transportation cost, mobile crushing installations are used.

The materiel for RA manufacturing does not differ from that of producing NA in quarries. However, it should be more robust to resist wear, and it handles large blocks of up to 1m. The main difference is that RAs need the elimination of contaminants such as wood, joint sealants, plastics, and steel which should be removed with blast of air for light materials and electro-magnets for steel. The materials are first separated from other undesired materials then treated by washing and air to take out contamination. The quality and grading of aggregates depend on the choice of the crusher type.

Jaw crusher: The material is crushed between a fixed jaw and a mobile jaw. The feed is subjected to repeated pressure as it passes downwards and is progressively reduced in size until it is small enough to pass out of the crushing chamber. This crusher produces less fines but the aggregates have a more elongated form.

Hammer (impact) crusher: The feed is fragmented by kinetic energy introduced by a rotating mass (the rotor) which projects the material against a fixed surface causing it to shatter causing further particle size reduction. This crusher produces more rounded shape.

The type of crusher and number of processing stages have considerable influence on the shape and size of RA. In general, for the same size, RAs tend to be coarser, more porous and rougher than NAs, due to the adhered mortar content (Dhir etal., 1999). After the primary crushing, which is normally performed using jaw crushers (Fong etal., 2004), it is preferable to adopt a secondary crushing stage (with cone crushers or impact crushers) (CCANZ, 2011) to further reduce the size of the CDW, producing more regularly shaped particles (Barbudo etal., 2012; Ferreira etal., 2011; Fonseca etal., 2011; Pedro etal., 2014, 2015; Gonzlez-Fonteboa and Martnez-Abella, 2008; Maultzsch and Mellmann, 1998; Dhir and Paine, 2007; Chidiroglou etal., 2008).

CDW that is subjected to a jaw crushing stage tends to result only in flatter RA (Ferreira etal., 2011; Fonseca etal., 2011; Hendriks, 1998; Tsoumani etal., 2015). It is possible to produce good-quality coarse RA within the specified size range by adjusting the crusher aperture (Hansen, 1992). In addition, the number of processing stages needs to be well thought out to ensure that the yield of coarse RA is not affected and that the quantity of fine RA is kept to the minimum (Angulo etal., 2004). This is because the finer fraction typically exhibits lower quality, as it accumulates a higher amount of pulverised old mortar (Etxeberria etal., 2007b; Meller and Winkler, 1998). Fine RA resulting from impact crushers tends to exhibit greater angularity and higher fineness modulus compared with standard natural sands (Lamond etal., 2002; Hansen, 1992; Buyle-Bodin and Hadjieva-Zaharieva, 2002).

One of the commonly known issues related to the use of RCA is its ability to generate a considerable amount of fines when the material is used (Thomas etal., 2016). As the RCA particles are moved around, they impact against one another, leading to the breakage of the friable adhered mortar, which may give rise to some technical problems such as an increase in the water demand of concrete mixes when used as an NA replacement (Thomas etal., 2013a,b; Poon etal., 2007).

The coarse fraction of RMA tends to show a higher shape index owing to the shape of the original construction material (e.g., perforated ceramic bricks) (De Brito etal., 2005). This can pose a problem in future applications as RMA may not compact as efficiently as RCA or NA (Khalaf and DeVenny, 2005). Its shape index may be reduced if the material is successively broken down to a lower particle size (De Brito etal., 2005).

Impact crushers (e.g., hammer mills and impact mills) employ sharp blows applied at high speed to free-falling rocks where comminution is by impact rather than compression. The moving parts are beaters, which transfer some of their kinetic energy to the ore particles upon contact. Internal stresses created in the particles are often large enough to cause them to shatter. These forces are increased by causing the particles to impact upon an anvil or breaker plate.

There is an important difference between the states of materials crushed by pressure and by impact. There are internal stresses in material broken by pressure that can later cause cracking. Impact causes immediate fracture with no residual stresses. This stress-free condition is particularly valuable in stone used for brick-making, building, and roadmaking, in which binding agents (e.g., tar) are subsequently added. Impact crushers, therefore, have a wider use in the quarrying industry than in the metal-mining industry. They may give trouble-free crushing on ores that tend to be plastic and pack when the crushing forces are applied slowly, as is the case in jaw and gyratory crushers. These types of ore tend to be brittle when the crushing force is applied instantaneously by impact crushers (Lewis et al., 1976).

Impact crushers are also favored in the quarry industry because of the improved product shape. Cone crushers tend to produce more elongated particles because of their ability to pass through the chamber unbroken. In an impact crusher, all particles are subjected to impact and the elongated particles, having a lower strength due to their thinner cross section, would be broken (Ramos et al., 1994; Kojovic and Bearman, 1997).

Figure 6.23(a) shows the cross section of a typical hammer mill. The hammers (Figure 6.23(b)) are made from manganese steel or nodular cast iron containing chromium carbide, which is extremely abrasion resistant. The breaker plates are made of the same material.

The hammers are pivoted so as to move out of the path of oversize material (or tramp metal) entering the crushing chamber. Pivoted (swing) hammers exert less force than they would if rigidly attached, so they tend to be used on smaller impact crushers or for crushing soft material. The exit from the mill is perforated, so that material that is not broken to the required size is retained and swept up again by the rotor for further impacting. There may also be an exit chute for oversize material which is swept past the screen bars. Certain design configurations include a central discharge chute (an opening in the screen) and others exclude the screen, depending on the application.

The hammer mill is designed to give the particles velocities of the order of that of the hammers. Fracture is either due to impact with the hammers or to the subsequent impact with the casing or grid. Since the particles are given high velocities, much of the size reduction is by attrition (i.e., particle on particle breakage), and this leads to little control on product size and a much higher proportion of fines than with compressive crushers.

The hammers can weigh over 100kg and can work on feed up to 20cm. The speed of the rotor varies between 500 and 3,000rpm. Due to the high rate of wear on these machines (wear can be taken up by moving the hammers on the pins) they are limited in use to relatively non-abrasive materials. They have extensive use in limestone quarrying and in the crushing of coal. A great advantage in quarrying is the fact that they produce a relatively cubic product.

A model of the swing hammer mill has been developed for coal applications (Shi et al., 2003). The model is able to predict the product size distribution and power draw for given hammer mill configurations (breaker gap, under-screen orientation, screen aperture) and operating conditions (feed rate, feed size distribution, and breakage characteristics).

For coarser crushing, the fixed hammer impact mill is often used (Figure 6.24). In these machines the material falls tangentially onto a rotor, running at 250500rpm, receiving a glancing impulse, which sends it spinning toward the impact plates. The velocity imparted is deliberately restricted to a fraction of the velocity of the rotor to avoid high stress and probable failure of the rotor bearings.

The fractured pieces that can pass between the clearances of the rotor and breaker plate enter a second chamber created by another breaker plate, where the clearance is smaller, and then into a third smaller chamber. The grinding path is designed to reduce flakiness and to produce cubic particles. The impact plates are reversible to even out wear, and can easily be removed and replaced.

The impact mill gives better control of product size than does the hammer mill, since there is less attrition. The product shape is more easily controlled and energy is saved by the removal of particles once they have reached the size required.

Large impact crushers will reduce 1.5m top size ROM ore to 20cm, at capacities of around 1500th1, although units with capacities of 3000th1 have been manufactured. Since they depend on high velocities for crushing, wear is greater than for jaw or gyratory crushers. Hence impact crushers are not recommended for use on ores containing over 15% silica (Lewis et al., 1976). However, they are a good choice for primary crushing when high reduction ratios are required (the ratio can be as high as 40:1) and the ore is relatively non-abrasive.

Developed in New Zealand in the late 1960s, over the years it has been marketed by several companies (Tidco, Svedala, Allis Engineering, and now Metso) under various names (e.g., duopactor). The crusher is finding application in the concrete industry (Rodriguez, 1990). The mill combines impact crushing, high-intensity grinding, and multi-particle pulverizing, and as such, is best suited in the tertiary crushing or primary grinding stage, producing products in the 0.0612mm size range. It can handle feeds of up to 650th1 at a top size of over 50mm. Figure 6.22 shows a Barmac in a circuit; Figure 6.25 is a cross-section and illustration of the crushing action.

The basic comminution principle employed involves acceleration of particles within a special ore-lined rotor revolving at high speed. A portion of the feed enters the rotor, while the remainder cascades to the crushing chamber. Breakage commences when rock enters the rotor, and is thrown centrifugally, achieving exit velocities up to 90ms1. The rotor continuously discharges into a highly turbulent particle cloud contained within the crushing chamber, where reduction occurs primarily by rock-on-rock impact, attrition, and abrasion.

This crusher developed by Jaques (now Terex Mineral Processing Solutions) has several internal chamber configurations available depending on the abrasiveness of the ore. Examples include the Rock on Rock, Rock on Anvil and Shoe and Anvil configurations (Figure 6.26). These units typically operate with 5 to 6 steel impellers or hammers, with a ring of thin anvils. Rock is hit or accelerated to impact on the anvils, after which the broken fragments freefall into the discharge chute and onto a product conveyor belt. This impact size reduction process was modeled by Kojovic (1996) and Djordjevic et al. (2003) using rotor dimensions and speed, and rock breakage characteristics measured in the laboratory. The model was also extended to the Barmac crushers (Napier-Munn et al., 1996).

Figure 9.1 shows common aluminum oxide-based grains. Also called corundum, alumina ore was mined as early as 2000 BC in the Greek island of Naxos. Its structure is based on -Al2O3 and various admixtures. Traces of chromium give alumina a red hue, iron makes it black, and titanium makes it blue. Its triagonal system reduces susceptibility to cleavage. Precious grades of Al2O3 are used as gemstones, and include sapphire, ruby, topaz, amethyst, and emerald.

Charles Jacobs (1900), a principal developer, fused bauxite at 2200C (4000F) before the turn of the 20th century. The resulting dense mass was crushed into abrasive particles. Presently, alumina is obtained by smelting aluminum alloys containing Al2O3 in electric furnaces at around 1260C (2300F), a temperature at which impurities separate from the solution and aluminum oxide crystallizes out. Depending upon the particular process and chemical composition there are a variety of forms of aluminum oxide. The poor thermal conductivity of alumina (33.5W/mK) is a significant factor that affects grinding performance. Alumina is available in a large range of grades because it allows substitution of other oxides in solid solution, and defect content can be readily controlled.

For grinding, lapping, and polishing bearing balls, roller races, and optical glasses, the main abrasive employed is alumina. Its abrasive characteristics are established during the furnacing and crushing operations, so very little of what is accomplished later significantly affects the features of the grains.

Aluminum oxide is tougher than SiC. There are four types of gradations for toughness. The toughest grain is not always the longest wearing. A grain that is simply too tough for an application will become dull and will rub the workpiece, increasing the friction, creating heat and vibrations. On the other hand, a grain that is too friable will wear away rapidly, shortening the life of the abrasive tool. Friability is a term used to describe the tendency for grain fractures to occur under load. There is a range of grain toughness suitable for each application. The white friable aluminum oxide is almost always bonded by vitrification. It is the main abrasive used in tool rooms because of its versatility for a wide range of materials. In general, the larger the crystals, the more friable the grain. The slower the cooling process, the larger are the crystals. To obtain very fine crystals, the charge is cooled as quickly as possible, and the abrasive grain is fused in small pigs of up to 2ton. Coarse crystalline abrasive grains are obtained from 5 to 6ton pigs allowed to cool in the furnace shell.

The raw material, bauxite, containing 8590% alumina, 25% TiO2, up to 10% iron oxide (Fe2O3), silica, and basic oxides, is fused in an electric-arc furnace at 2600C (4700F). The bed of crushed and calcined bauxite, mixed with coke and iron to remove impurities, is poured into the bottom of the furnace where a carbon starter rod is laid down. A couple of large vertical carbon rods are then brought down to touch and a heavy current applied. The starter rod is rapidly consumed, by which time the heat melts the bauxite, which then becomes an electrolyte. Bauxite is added over several hours to build up the volume of melt. Current is controlled by adjusting the height of the electrodes, which are eventually consumed in the process.

After cooling, the alumina is broken up and passed through a series of hammer, beater, crush, roller, and/or ball mills to reduce it to the required grain size and shape, producing either blocky or thin splintered grains. After milling, the product is sieved to the appropriate sizes down to about 40 m (#400). The result is brown alumina containing typically 3% TiO2. Increased TiO2 content increases toughness while reducing hardness. Brown alumina has a Knoop hardness of 2090 and a medium friability.

Electrofused alumina is also made using low-soda Bayer process alumina that is more than 99% pure. The resulting alumina grain is one of the hardest, but also the most friable, of the alumina family providing a cool cutting action. This abrasive in a vitrified bond is, therefore, suitable for precision grinding.

White aluminum oxide is one of the most popular grades for micron-size abrasive. To produce micron sizes, alumina is ball-milled or vibro-milled after crushing and then traditionally separated into different sizes using an elutriation process. This consists of passing abrasive slurry and water through a series of vertical columns. The width of the columns is adjusted to produce a progressively slower vertical flow velocity from column to column. Heavier abrasive settles out in the faster flowing columns while lighter particles are carried over to the next. The process is effective down to about 5 m and is also used for micron sizing of SiC. Air classification has also been employed.

White 99% pure aluminum oxide, called mono-corundum, is obtained by sulfidation of bauxite, which outputs different sizes of isometric corundum grains without the need for crushing. The crystals are hard, sharp, and have better cleavage than other forms of aluminum oxides, which qualifies it for grinding hardened steels and other tough and ductile materials. Fine-grained aluminum oxide with a good self-sharpening effect is used for finishing hardened and high-speed steels, and for internal grinding.

Not surprisingly, since electrofusion technology has been available for the last one hundred years, many variations in the process exist both in terms of starting compositions and processing routes. For example:

Red-brown or gray regular alumina. Contains 9193% Al2O3 and has poor cleavage. This abrasive is used in resinoid and vitrified bonds and coated abrasives for rough grinding when the risk of rapid wheel wear is low.

Chrome addition. Semi-fine aloxite, pink with 0.5% chromium oxide (Cr2O3), and red with 15% Cr2O3, lies between common aloxite, having less than 95% Al2O3 and more than 2% TiO2, and fine aloxite, which has more than 95% Al2O3 and less than 2% TiO2. The pink grain is slightly harder than white alumina, while the addition of a small amount of TiO2 increases its toughness. The resultant product is a medium-sized grain available in elongated, or blocky but sharp, shapes. Ruby alumina has a higher chrome oxide content of 3% and is more friable than pink alumina. The grains are blocky, sharp edged, and cool cutting, making them popular for tool room and dry grinding of steels, e.g., ice skate sharpening. Vanadium oxide has also been used as an additive giving a distinctive green hue.

Zirconia addition. Aluminazirconia is obtained during the production process by adding 1040% ZrO2 to the alumina. There are at least three different aluminazirconia compositions used in grinding wheels: 75% Al2O3 and 25% ZrO2, 60% Al2O3 and 40% ZrO2, and finally, 65% Al2O3, 30% ZrO2, and 5% TiO2. The manufacture usually includes rapid solidification to produce a fine grain and tough structure. The resulting abrasives are fine grain, tough, highly ductile, and give excellent life in medium to heavy stock removal applications and grinding with high pressures, such as billet grinding in foundries.

Titania addition. Titaniaaloxite, containing 95% Al2O3 and approximately 3% Ti2O3, has better cutting ability and improved ductility than high-grade bauxite common alumina. It is recommended when large and variable mechanical loads are involved.

Single crystal white alumina. The grain growth is carefully controlled in a sulfide matrix and is separated by acid leaching without crushing. The grain shape is nodular which aids bond retention, avoiding the need for crushing and reducing mechanical defects from processing.

Post-fusion processing methods. This type of particle reduction method can greatly affect grain shape. Impact crushers such as hammer mills create a blocky shape while roll crushers cause splintering. It is possible, using electrostatic forces to separate sharp shapes from blocky grains, to provide grades of the same composition but with very different cutting actions.

The performance of the abrasive can also be altered by heat treatment, particularly for brown alumina. The grit is heated to 11001300 C (20152375 F), depending on the grit size, in order to anneal cracks and flaws created by the crushing process. This can enhance toughness by 2540%.

Finally, several coating processes exist to improve bonding of the grains in the grinding wheel. Red Fe2O3 is applied at high temperatures to increase the surface area for better bonding in resin cut-off wheels. Silane is applied for some resin bond wheel applications to repel coolant infiltration between the bond and abrasive grit, and thus protect the resin bond.

A limitation of electrofusion is that the resulting abrasive crystal structure is very large; an abrasive grain may consist of only one to three crystals. Consequently, when grain fracture occurs, the resulting particle loss may be a large proportion of the whole grain. This results in inefficient grit use. One way to avoid this is to dramatically reduce the crystal size.

The earliest grades of microcrystalline grits were produced as early as 1963 (Ueltz, 1963) by compacting a fine-grain bauxite slurry, granulating to the desired grit size, and sintering at 1500C (2735F). The grain shape and aspect ratio could be controlled by extruding the slurry.

One of the most significant developments since the invention of the Higgins furnace was the release in 1986, by the Norton Company, of seeded gel (SG) abrasive (Leitheiser and Sowman, 1982; Cottringer et al., 1986). This abrasive was a natural outcome of the wave of technology sweeping the ceramics industry at that time to develop high strength engineering ceramics using chemical precipitation methods. This class of abrasives is often termed ceramic. SG is produced by a chemical process. In a precursor of boehmite, MgO is first precipitated to create 50-m-sized aluminamagnesia spinel seed crystals. The resulting gel is dried, granulated to size, and sintered at 1200C (2200F). The resulting grains are composed of a single-phase -alumina structure with a crystalline size of about 0.2m. Defects from crushing are avoided; the resulting abrasive is unusually tough but self-sharpening because fracture now occurs at the micron level.

With all the latest technologies, it took significant time and application knowledge to understand how to apply SG. The abrasive was so tough that it had to be blended with regular fused abrasives at levels as low as 5% to avoid excessive grinding forces. Typical blends are now five SGs (50%), three SGs (30%), and one SG (10%). These blended abrasive grades can increase wheel life by up to a factor of 10 over regular fused abrasives, although manufacturing costs are higher.

In 1981, prior to the introduction of SG, the 3M Co. introduced a solgel abrasive material called Cubitron for use in coated abrasive fiber discs (Bange and Orf, 1998). This was a submicron chemically precipitated and sintered material but, unlike SG, had a multiphase composite structure that did not use seed grains to control crystalline size. The value of the material for grinding wheel applications was not recognized until after the introduction of SG. In the manufacture of Cubitron, alumina is co-precipitated with various modifiers such as magnesia, yttria, lanthana, and neodymia to control microstructural strength and surface morphology upon subsequent sintering. For example, one of the most popular materials, Cubitron 321, has a microstructure containing submicron platelet inclusions which act as reinforcements somewhat similar to a whisker-reinforced ceramic (Bange and Orf, 1998).

Direct comparison of the performance of SG and Cubitron is difficult because the grain is merely one component of the grinding wheel. SG is harder (21GPa) than Cubitron (19GPa). Experimental evidence suggests that wheels made from SG have longer life, but Cubitron is freer cutting. Cubitron is the preferred grain in some applications from a cost/performance viewpoint. Advanced grain types are prone to challenge from a well-engineered, i.e., shape selected, fused grain that is the product of a lower cost, mature technology. However, it is important to realize that the wheel cost is often insignificant compared to other grinding process costs in the total cost per part.

The SG grain shape can be controlled by extrusion. Norton has taken this concept to an extreme and in 1999 introduced TG2 (extruded SG) grain in a product called ALTOS. The TG2 grains have the appearance of rods with very long aspect ratios. The resulting packing characteristics of these shapes in a grinding wheel create a high strength, lightweight structure with porosity levels as high as 70% or even greater. The grains touch each other at only a few points, where a bond also concentrates in the same way as a spot weld. The product offers potential for higher stock removal rates and higher wheelspeeds due to the strength and density of the resulting wheel body (Klocke and Muckli, 2000).

Recycling of concrete involves several steps to generate usable RCA. Screening and sorting of demolished concrete from C&D debris is the first step of recycling process. Demolished concrete goes through different crushing processes to acquire desirable grading of recycled aggregate. Impact crusher, jaw crusher, cone crusher or sometimes manual crushing by hammer are preferred during primary and secondary crushing stage of parent concrete to produce RA. Based on the available literature step by step flowchart for recycling of aggregate is represented in Fig. 1. Some researchers have also developed methods like autogenous cleaning process [46], pre-soaking treatment in water [47], chemical treatment, thermal treatment [48], microwave heating method [49] and mechanical grinding method for removing adhered mortar to obtain high quality of RA. Depending upon the amount of attached mortar, recycled aggregate has been classified into different categories as shown in Fig. 2.

Upon arrival at the recycling plant, CDW may either enter directly into the processing operation or need to be broken down to obtain materials with workable particle sizes, in which case hydraulic breakers mounted on tracked or wheeled excavators are used. In either case, manual sorting of large pieces of steel, wood, plastics and paper may be required, to minimize the degree of contamination.

The three types of crushers most used for crushing CDW are jaw, impact, and gyratory crushers (Fig.8). A jaw crusher consists of two plates fixed at an angle (Fig.8a); one plate remains stationary while the other oscillates back and forth relative to it, crushing the material passing between them. This crusher can withstand large pieces of reinforced concrete, which would probably cause other types of crushers to break down. Therefore, the material is initially reduced in jaw crushers before going through other types. The particle size reduction depends on the maximum and minimum size of the gap at the plates. Jaw crushers were found to produce RA with the most suitable grain-size distribution for concrete production (Molin etal., 2004).

An impact crusher breaks CDW by striking them with a high speed rotating impact, which imparts a shearing force on the debris (Fig.8b). Materials fall onto the rotor and are caught by teeth or hard steel blades fastened to the rotor, which hurl them against the breaker plate, smashing them to smaller-sized particles. Impact crushers provide better grain-size distribution of RA for road construction purposes and are less sensitive to material that cannot be crushed (i.e. steel reinforcement).

Gyratory crushers, which work on the same principle as cone crushers (Fig.8c), exhibit a gyratory motion driven by an eccentric wheel and will not accept materials with large particle sizes as they are likely to become jammed. However, gyratory and cone crushers have advantages such as relatively low energy consumption, reasonable amount of control over particle size and production of low amount of fine particles.

Generally, jaw and impact crushers have a large reduction factor, defined as the relationship between the input's particle size and that of the output. A jaw crusher crushes only a small proportion of the original aggregate particles but an impact crusher crushes mortar and aggregate particles alike, and thus may generate twice the amount of fines for the same maximum size of particle (O'Mahony, 1990).

In order to produce RA with predictable grading curve, it is better to process debris in two crushing stages, at least. It may be possible to consider a tertiary crushing stage and further, which would undoubtedly produce better quality coarse RA (i.e. less adhered mortar and with a rounder shape). However, concrete produced with RA subjected to a tertiary crushing stage may show only slightly better performance than that made with RA from a secondary crushing stage (Gokce etal., 2011; Nagataki etal., 2004). Furthermore, more crushing stages would yield products with decreasing particle sizes, which contradicts the mainstream use of RA (i.e. coarser RA fractions are preferred, regardless of the application). These factors should be taken into account when producing RA as, from an economical and environmental point of view, it means that relatively good quality materials can be produced with lower energy consumption and with a higher proportion of coarse aggregates, if the number of crushing stages is prudently reduced.

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