'this initiative comes straight from the heart': san antonio dentist pays it forward to help families during pandemic with free dental care

'this initiative comes straight from the heart': san antonio dentist pays it forward to help families during pandemic with free dental care

SAN ANTONIO Over the past year, San Antonians citywide grappled with extreme financial challenges. But one dentist office decided to make life easier for a few of their patients by giving them a mouth makeover.

Advanced Smile Care of North San Antonio traditionally hosts an annual dentistry event called "Dentistry From The Heart." They've been hosting the event for 15 years, giving away roughly $100,000 in free dental care every year of the event.

COVID-19 halted the initiative in 2020, but the dental practice still wanted to pay it forward to patients during the crisis needing a financial hand up. So it gave them what it calls "The Gift of Dentistry.

"My teeth might look like they're together, but I actually have a lot of missing teeth," said Crystal Ennis, a patient at Advanced Smile Care. "I don't have any back teeth. All of my chewing is done in the front part of my mouth, and I just used drugs for a really long time. Smoking meth really took a toll on them.

"It's nice to be able to give something away and give some of your time," added Dr. Laura Benjamin. "Kind of like doing a mission trip. You just go, give your time, bring materials, and we have the ability to do that for patients, too."

"This is the least we could do to help families during the pandemic," added Dr. Tony Thomas, lead dentist at Advanced Smile Care. "This initiative comes straight from the heart and it is representative of our DNA at Advanced Smile Care. We're all about making patients happy and ensuring they have healthy smiles.

They (The dental assistants) go sit in that chair, and everybody comes walking in. And it gives me this unbelievable gift, which...I was pretty much a person with a lot of words, but I was just speechless," he said. "This is already paid in full by the generous people here at Advanced Smile Care, and it's one less bill that they don't have to worry about."

"When you change someone's smile, it makes a huge impact in their life," Dental Assistant Brittney Dobbs said. "So that small little difference that you're doing for someone makes a huge impact and a huge impact in the world."

covid-19 and human traffickingthe amplified impact on vulnerable populations | pediatrics | jama pediatrics | jama network

covid-19 and human traffickingthe amplified impact on vulnerable populations | pediatrics | jama pediatrics | jama network

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has not only revealed inequities, it has also exacerbated them. Already-vulnerable populations are bearing the brunt of the health impacts of COVID-19 and also experiencing educational and economic consequences. This amplified impact of COVID-19 on vulnerable populations has important implications for individuals at risk of or exploited in human trafficking.

Human trafficking inflicts a breadth of harms on those exploited, including physical, emotional, and sexual violence.1 The COVID-19 pandemic has created circumstances that may increase the risk of trafficking, inhibit identification of those who are trafficked and those who survive trafficking, and make it harder to deliver comprehensive services to support survivors recovery.

To begin, COVID-19s impact implicates many of the risk factors for human trafficking. Homelessness and a history of child maltreatment are 2 significant risk factors for trafficking of young people.2 The economic impact of COVID-19, including widespread job loss, has left many people unable to pay rent. Despite moratoriums on evictions for some, others have been left unprotected.3 In addition, when moratoriums end, individuals may still be unemployed and unable to pay rent. These factors heighten the vulnerability of already-struggling families and can result in adults and children ending up homeless. This can leave youth in particular at heightened risk of various forms of exploitation, from survival sex to exploitation in various labor sectors.

Similarly, there is widespread agreement among child advocates that COVID-19 has spurred an increase in child maltreatment. Although reporting is down (primarily because mandatory reporters, including teachers and pediatricians, are not seeing some children), hospital reports of child abuse injuries have increased.4 The trauma of child maltreatment, increased time on the street, or the combination of both leaves young people at greater risk of human trafficking.

The pandemic appears to be spurring other risks. With school closures, children and adolescents are spending more time online, increasing risks that could lead to trafficking situations. The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children noted an increase from 2 million to 4.2 million reports of online exploitation from March to April 2020.5

For those already in trafficking situations, COVID-19 has worsened circumstances. Protecting against exposure to the virus in trafficking situations can be more challenging. In forced labor and commercial sex settings, those who are trafficked may have little access to or choice of whether to wear masks or to insist that others nearby do. And social distancing may be difficult, if not impossible, in these settings. Given the inequitable distribution of COVID-19s impact, trafficked individuals may also live in neighborhoods with higher rates of infection.

Moreover, COVID-19 makes identification of trafficked individuals and survivors more challenging. School closings have foreclosed opportunities for teachers and other education personnel to identify at-risk or exploited youth. In addition, as COVID-19 has burdened hospitals, and particularly emergency departments, individuals with less significant symptoms have been urged to stay home. This guidance, which can help hospitals avoid being overwhelmed, can have unintended consequences for many trafficked youth who are uninsured and often rely on emergency departments as their primary source of health care. Delays in seeking care risk both adverse consequences for trafficking survivors health and missed opportunities for identifying individuals trapped in trafficking situations.

Even when trafficked individuals present at hospitals, some of the protocols made necessary by COVID-19 present new barriers for health care professionals who aim to build a care relationship with patients. For example, many trafficked youth have experienced significant trauma and have a history of negative experiences with authority figures, leaving them reluctant to trust yet another new adult. Wearing masks and other personal protective equipment may make it harder for health care professionals to connect with trafficked youth and build the trust that enables them to open up and share what they are experiencing.

When survivors are identified, COVID-19 can affect services. Because of the breadth of harms inflicted on trafficking survivors, they typically need a range of servicesphysical and mental health care, education and job training, legal services, and more.1 Shutdowns associated with the pandemic have constrained the ability to deliver the comprehensive, integrated care that survivors need. Moreover, stay-at-home and shelter-in-place orders can increase social isolation, which can adversely affect mental health recovery.

Given the various ways that COVID-19 has affected individuals at risk of and exploited in human trafficking, there is a need for a focused strategy on how to respond to human trafficking during this pandemic. General guidance, such as if you show symptoms, call your physician, may be unhelpful to a population in which many are uninsured and do not have a regular health care practitioner.

Although measures must be taken to minimize the risks of COVID-19, we also must recognize that COVID-19 may exacerbate the conditions in which human trafficking can flourish. This is not merely about addressing online exploitation but also about mitigating housing and food insecurity, which push vulnerable individuals into riskier situations. Children experiencing maltreatment must be identified, and that necessitates new strategies for ensuring we reach children who are now isolated.

In care settings, health care professionals must think creatively about how to overcome COVID-19related barriers to building trust. This step is essential both to providing quality care and to maximizing opportunities to identify trafficking survivors.

We also must adapt services so that we can deliver the comprehensive, integrated services that survivors need and deserve. Prior to the pandemic, many trafficking survivors entry point into the health care system was to present with an acute medical problem. Often it was during that visit that mental health needs were identified. If survivors were interested, they were connected to mental health services. Given this pattern of health care use, an integrated health care model, in which mental health staff and medical staff work side by side with open schedules, was more likely to meet the needs of survivors. Not only could survivors receive mental health services during a medical visit, but they could also be connected with other important services, including legal services. However, this integrated model has become more difficult to deliver as a result of COVID-19related business closures or work-from-home policies.

Adaptive strategies, like the increased use of telehealth services, may not work as successfully with trafficking survivors as they have with other populations. Some trafficked youth have lifestyles that make it difficult to attend scheduled telehealth appointments. Also, their living arrangements may not permit the privacy and confidentiality appropriate for patient care, or they may lack necessary computer equipment for telehealth visits. Language and cultural barriers may add further challenges. Health care entities must think creatively about how to provide the integrated services that trafficked individuals need while working within the constraints of the pandemic. That means not only addressing immediate health needs but also collaborating with other service providers to ensure trafficking survivors have access to safe housing, are not isolated in abusive situations, and have the support they need.6

The impact of COVID-19 on trafficking survivors is significant. The virus has disrupted their lives and support networks while increasing financial stress, food insecurity, interpersonal violence, and grief over the loss of loved ones. In response, it is essential that we develop tailored strategies to meet the needs of individuals at risk of or exploited in human trafficking.

Conflicts of interest comprise financial interests, activities, and relationships within the past 3 years including but not limited to employment, affiliation, grants or funding, consultancies, honoraria or payment, speaker's bureaus, stock ownership or options, expert testimony, royalties, donation of medical equipment, or patents planned, pending, or issued.

impact clearvu plastic soap dispenser, 46 oz, 5.5

impact clearvu plastic soap dispenser, 46 oz, 5.5" x 4.25" x 8.5, white (9346)

Unique water-resistant top and a design that prevents bacteria growth make this dispenser ideal for showers. Ample 46-oz. curved see-through tank accommodates a variety of liquid and lotion soaps (except pumice) and allows clear view of soap level. Large push bar makes dispensing easy. With removable backplate and hidden security key lock to prevent vandalism. Dispenser Type: For Liquids; Capacity (Volume): 46 oz; Mounting: Wall; Color(s): White.

Officecrave.com is a leader in office supplies and business supplies including technology products, maintenance supplies, furniture and more. Our goal is to provide businesses with the lowest price on the highest-quality items and the Impact ClearVu Plastic Soap Dispenser, 46 oz, 5.5\" x 4.25\" x 8.5, White (9346) is no exception.

All products on OfficeCrave.com including the Impact ClearVu Plastic Soap Dispenser, 46 oz, 5.5\" x 4.25\" x 8.5, White (9346) are manufactured under ISO 9001 Quality Standards. We also stock a full line of TAA compliant products. Being green is an important part of our business and we are meeting all Green Compliance Standards.

Please note: Once you receive word that this item is available, it's up to you to act! An email notification guarantees neither inventory nor price. But don't worry: should you miss out on the first shipment, you can always request another notification.

bulk lotion soap dispensers | item #9346 | impact products

bulk lotion soap dispensers | item #9346 | impact products

Dispenses approximately one cc per stroke. Tested and proven to work with antimicrobial, antibacterial and antiseptic soaps. Accommodates liquid and lotion soaps, except pumice. Unique water-resistant top, curved design, and see-thru tank. Large push bar is conveniently placed and easy-to-operate. Removable backplate. Improved design eliminates soap waste.

Impact Products is the dominant manufacturer of supplies and accessories to the cleaning industry. We operate office, manufacturing and distribution centers in: Toledo, Ohio, Purvis, Mississippi, and Riverside, California.

bulk foam soap dispenser | impact products

bulk foam soap dispenser | impact products

Impact Products is the dominant manufacturer of supplies and accessories to the cleaning industry. We operate office, manufacturing and distribution centers in: Toledo, Ohio, Purvis, Mississippi, and Riverside, California.

bulk foam soap dispenser | item #9345 | impact products

bulk foam soap dispenser | item #9345 | impact products

Dispenses approximately one cc per stroke. Tested and proven to work with antimicrobial, antibacterial and antiseptic soaps. Accommodates liquid and lotion soaps, except pumice. Unique water-resistant top, curved design, and see-thru tank. Large push bar is conveniently placed and easy-to-operate. Removable backplate. Improved design eliminates soap waste.

Impact Products is the dominant manufacturer of supplies and accessories to the cleaning industry. We operate office, manufacturing and distribution centers in: Toledo, Ohio, Purvis, Mississippi, and Riverside, California.

impact products

impact products

Mopping is a breeze with our new sidepress wringer and bucket combo. Non-marking casters glide quietly across the floor and built-in holders keep mop handles secure during transport. Plus, a set of included color clips allows for easy color coding.

Make touchless hand sanitizing easy! This durable, all metal stand is ideal for lobbies, schools, medical offices and many other public and private facilities. It also is a convenient way to dispense face masks and ProGuard disposable gloves!

As businesses have reopened, many will not have the tools or expertise to comply with new, strict cleaning mandates. These resources help businesses in a variety of vertical markets choose the right tools and follow the correct procedures.

Impact Products is the dominant manufacturer of supplies and accessories to the cleaning industry. We operate office, manufacturing and distribution centers in: Toledo, Ohio, Purvis, Mississippi, and Riverside, California.

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