hammer (1972) - movie | moviefone

hammer (1972) - movie | moviefone

Hotheaded laborer B.J. Hammer can't go long without ending up in a fight, and, after he comes out on top in a particularly impressive workplace scuffle, word of his brawling skills makes its way to Davis, a top boxing manager. Hammer is hired by Davis and begins a lucrative career in the ring, only to find out that his new employer wants him to throw a fight and take part in other illicit activities. Hammer reacts to this news violently, and the feud is on.

a field guide to the hammer house of horror women - flashbak

a field guide to the hammer house of horror women - flashbak

Weve presented you before with guidebooks to the women of A Man Called U.N.C.L.E. (The Women from U.N.C.L.E.) and Star Trek (Beam Me Up Totty: The Babes of Star Trek). Now its time to tackle perhaps the greatest babe catalog of them all: The Hammer House of Cleavage. er, I mean Horror. Only the Bond movies hold a candle to the bodice popping Hammer lineup.

You remember these flicks: The most memorable being the Christopher Lee/Peter Cushingfilms, always featuring at least one well-endowedgal. Weve presented you with them before; however, its time to dive in methodically, being as comprehensive as time will allow. Are you up for it? A warning: Cleavage saturation levels will be reached. Proceed with caution.

After her Hammer days, Beacham moved on to The Colbys (1985) a spinoff of Dynasty. Unfortunately, during this time her nude photoshoot for Playboy surfaced, and she lost a very lucrative cosmetics deal. Despite this, she says the only thing she regrets about the nude pictorial is the ugly wig she wore.

The following year,Linda bared all in the non-Hammer horror flick Blood on Satans Claw (1971), then continued the trend of disrobing in a series of raunchy British comedies: Confessions of a Window Cleaner (1974) and the subtly titled Lets Get Laid (1978).

Sure, shes probably best remembered for her sevebCarry Onfilms and her role in The Spy Who Loved Me, but Ill always remember her best from one of Hammers greatest, Blood of the Mummys Tomb. of course, who can forget her Hai Karate commercials?

Had a brief role as The Irish Girl in On Her Majestys Secret Service (1969) and popped in and out of British television in the 1970s and 80s. In Scars of Dracula her voice is actually dubbed her voice was considered too low and grown up for the innocent young character she played.

Martine was Miss Jamaica before landing roles in two Bond films: From Russia with Love (1963) and Thunderball (1965). She got the part in Dr. Jekyll and Sister Hyde when Caroline Munro turned it down due to a nude scene. She called Prehistoric Women the silliest film ever made.

She was bornDietlinde Zechnerin Germany and became Playboys Playmate of the Month in 1966. She went on to star in a memorable episode of Star Trek (Mudds Women) then got the Hammer role. Unfortunately, Ms. Denberg had to retreat to Austria to be with her family after hard drugs (including LSD) had taken their toll.

Plays a prostitute who gets killed inDr Jekyll and Sister Hyde (1971) and a fairly memorable scene (albeit short and in the buff) as a stage actress in A Clockwork Orange. She currently runs an antique clothing store in London.

Born Ingoushka Petrov, she spent three years in a Nazi concentration camp before escaping (and marrying the guy that helped her get out). If you had to pick THE Hammer Horror babe, Ingrid Pitt would be a safe choice. She strengthened her scream queen status even further appearing in the Amicus horror anthology film The House That Dripped Blood and the classic Wicker Man (and, no, its not the one with Nicholas Cage).

Who doesnt love Joanna Lumley (Absolutely Fabulous)? Unfortunately, she came on the Hammer scene too late. The mojo was gone. Lumley plays basically the same role as Beacham played in Dracula AD 1972; however, the thrill is over. This film marks the sharp downward turning point for Hammer.

You see this time and again with actresses from this period: they get naked in a few B-movies, start to get a little bit famous (via a Hammer film, for instance), then poof theyre gone. This exact career path happens for the next entry (Yutte Stensgaard); some low budget flicks requiring nudity, a Hammer film, then poof.

In the case of the Collinson twins, they had barely made it off the island of Malta before they were getting naked for the camera. First it was a Playboy shoot then The Love Machine (1971) and Passion Potion (1971). Twins of Evil was their big break even getting an appearance on The Tonight Show.

In 1971 there was a tidal wave of Collinson appearances in nudie magazines, plusthree films. But then, I suppose. regret? I dont know what happened, because both girls went back to Malta. Madeleine married a Royal Air Force officer and raised two kids; her twin also had two kids, and both passed the ensuing decades farfrom the limelight. Madeleine (pictured above) passed away in 2014.

Other than a few other B-movies requiring her shed her wardrobe,Yutte Stensgaards claim to fame is the lead role in Lust for a Vampire (1971). Her incredible beauty (and ready willingness to drop her top) made her a cult horror icon, despite this being her only substantive role. Not long after, it seems poor Yutte had regrets about her film work and couldnt get taken seriously; so, she headed to the US and sold advertising onreligiousradio. A born-again christian, she has been very hesitate to comment on (or even acknowledge) her former life.

One look at Yvonnes filmography and its instantly apparent every role is cleavage based. Serving Wench, French Girl, Servant Girl.. etc. Its one minor, unnamed role after another, each highlighting abundant cleavage. Curse of the Werewolf is no exception; except here she gets a meatier role as Oliver Reeds mom. Trivia: Her husbandwrote the lyrics for the Goldfinger (1964) and You Only Live Twice (1967)theme songs.

Munro was making a straight trajectory for stardom in the mid-seventies with a role in both a Sinbad and Bond movie; but, she chose to stay in Britain close to her family instead oftaking it to the next level in Hollywood. Caroline spent the next few years in B-movies; most notably, Starcrash with David Hasselhoff (1979). Shed eventually film on American soil, but her ship had sailed.

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that's your funeral (1972) - imdb

that's your funeral (1972) - imdb

The animosity between two rival undertakers is amplified when drug traffickers attempt to use coffins and hearses to smuggle their wares.The animosity between two rival undertakers is amplified when drug traffickers attempt to use coffins and hearses to smuggle their wares.The animosity between two rival undertakers is amplified when drug traffickers attempt to use coffins and hearses to smuggle their wares.

vampire circus (1972) - rotten tomatoes

vampire circus (1972) - rotten tomatoes

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Erotic, grotesque, chilling, bloody, suspenseful, and loaded with doom and gloom atmosphere, this is the kind of experiment in terror that reinvigorates your love of the scary movie artform.

Hammer's most elusive Gothic horror movie contains frequent nudity, but its arthouse kinkiness -- its hints of pedophilia, bestiality and incest -- offers a more likely explanation for its limited distribution than its exposed skin.

Never recovers the concentrated erotic-violent high ground of [its] delirious overture, which stands as a wildly entertaining example of over-the-top horror filmmaking.

Erotic, grotesque, chilling, bloody, suspenseful, and loaded with doom and gloom atmosphere, this is the kind of experiment in terror that reinvigorates your love of the scary movie artform.

Hammer's most elusive Gothic horror movie contains frequent nudity, but its arthouse kinkiness -- its hints of pedophilia, bestiality and incest -- offers a more likely explanation for its limited distribution than its exposed skin.

Never recovers the concentrated erotic-violent high ground of [its] delirious overture, which stands as a wildly entertaining example of over-the-top horror filmmaking.

dracula a. d. 1972 movie review (1972) | roger ebert

dracula a. d. 1972 movie review (1972) | roger ebert

The friendly folks at Hammer Films Ltd., the British specialists in horror flicks, have this thing about tiny glass vials. Theyll use a vial or two in almost every movie they make. Sometimes they have crystal vials, but mostly just your ordinary glass vial.

The vials are handy for storing dehydrated blood from Count Dracula, who left so much blood behind him when he died that, alive, he would have been a godsend to the blood bank, had his blood not been overrun with vampire germs. Has it occurred to anyone, by the way, that the new Illinois blood law distinguishes between blood that is purchased and donated, but makes no mention of blood like Draculas, which was ... borrowed?

Public prejudice against vampires still runs at a fairly high level, unfortunately, and that is why you never hear of a vampire donating his services when an emergency call goes out for a rare blood type. With a bit of organization and a list of rare blood donors, a competent team of vampires should be able to come back with the necessary plasma in no time. This is not the unsavory prospect it would have been in the 18th or l9th Centuries; the widespread use among vampires of toothpaste has removed one of the age-old barriers to their acceptance.

In any event, Dracula A.D. 1972 opens with a striking testimonial to the staying power of Draculas blood. We remember from Taste the Blood of Dracula, an earlier Hammer endeavor, that when his dried blood is mixed with a little water and taken orally in medicinal amounts, the user becomes infected with the counts evil spirit. Thats more or less what happens again this time.

A young man who looks curiously like Alex (Stanley Kubricks hero in A Clockwork Orange) wants to be a vampire. He hangs around all day in a strange coffeehouse that looks curiously like the milk bar in A Clockwork Orange, and he looks out from under a lowered brow, just like Alex in A Clockwork Orange or Dan Walker in his campaign posters. He seems to be a symbol of the general decay at Hammer Films, which, having brought the horror film to a peak of perfection and created the first new horror superstar in years (Christopher Lee), now seems willing to follow the artistic leads of violence-come-latelies like Kubrick. Alas.

Anyway, the novice lays hands on some dehydrated Dracula blood, liquefies it during a bizarre ritual in a bombed-out church, and sets into motion a complex chain of forbidden rituals designed to display Stephanie Beachams cleavage to the greatest possible advantage.

This isnt a terrific rationale for another horror flick but, given Miss Beachams ability to heave, and her bosom to heave with, it will have to do. On leaving the theater, I was given an honorary membership card in the Count Dracula society, and a lapel pin which I inadvertently stuck myself with. And not a vial in sight.

hammer (1972) - plot summary - imdb

hammer (1972) - plot summary - imdb

A dock worker becomes a prizefighter, but gets mixed up with a crooked manager. A sympathetic L.A. detective tries to set him straight, but he won't listen. His manager, who is also a drug dealer, tells him that he has to take a dive during an important fight, and to ensure his cooperation, his girlfriend is kidnapped.

fred

fred "the hammer" williamson

The actor: Fred Williamson, a former NFL star who became an action hero in countless low-budget Hollywood indies and Italian B-movies in the '70s and '80s. One of Williamson's Italian films, Inglorious Bastards, has just been released on DVD in a three-disc special edition, and has been in the headlines lately due to an upcoming film by Quentin Tarantino that borrows the title and some of the premise.

Fred Williamson: It was an opportunity for me to do what I do well, which is to be athletic, fight, shoot, and kick people's ass. The most exciting part of the film for me was jumping off a damn bridge onto a moving train. It was exciting. My adrenaline was flowing like the Super Bowl, man. I was ready to do that.

FW: Never a stuntman when I work. I don't use stunt doubles, man. Because first of all, there's no black actors my size in Hollywood, and certainly none in Italy where we did the film. So I'm forced to do all my stunts. But if I couldn't do all my stunts, I'd do something else, because that's part of the pleasure of being in the movie business, to be fit enough to do stunts. I never used a stuntman.

FW: Oh yeah, I did that for nearly ten years. I did a series called Black Cobra, which was like a black Clint Eastwood kind of character. Then I did films like 1990: Bronx Warriors. I think they were trying to mold me into being the next Woody Strode, because Woody Strode was aging at that time, and I was going to be the next black gladiator. It was all fun. I was having a great time. I was living a good life in the movie business and having a great time.

FW: Well, because the film market died. Their ability to sell these films to the American market ceased to exist, and even today films that are made in Europe don't do well over here. They don't get distribution. Probably the last popular foreign film from Italy was Il Postino, and by American standards it didn't really make a lot of money. By European standards or Italian standards it did well. Americans are spoiled. We like everything perfect. We like to see the mouth and the words come out at the same time. The Italians, the French, all the other European countries to them, it doesn't bother them. They don't mind.

FW: I'm not surprised by anything Quentin does, you know? Quentin is Quentin. Quentin jumps on whatever he thinks is popular. He jumped on the '70s movies that we did with the one he did with Pam Grier and Robert Forster [Jackie Brown]. That was throwback stuff. He did stuff in that movie that if we had done the same thing back in the '70s they would've laughed us off the screen. But Quentin knows how to capitalize on the public's mentality. He's good at that.

FW: He has not said anything to me. I don't even know if he knows that I was even in it. And I'm getting all these calls from around the world about Quentin doing Inglorious Bastards, but I have not gotten any acknowledgement from Quentin that he even knows that I was in the movie.

FW: It helps a lot because he understands who I am. And he knows that I will not do anything that is destructive to my image. No matter what role I play, I have a certain image to maintain. I believe I'm a role model and I take my parts accordingly. So him having seen all the films I had done in the past, he knows what kind of characterization I'm going to bring to the part and to the screen. So he would not dare ask me to do something that's destructive.

FW: That was the beginning of my career. I had just retired from pro football, and I was an architect by trade, with a degree from Northwestern University, and I was working for Bechtel Steel. It was six months of Bechtel Steel and six months of football. That was fine with me. I could do that. When I stopped playing football and that six months turned into nine months, and then that nine months turned into ten months, those walls at the Bechtel Architectural Firm started to close in on me. So I started looking for something else to do. And I said, "Damn, I don't want to sell cars or sell insurance," which is what everybody was walking into after finishing football back in those days, because nobody made any money. So I'm watching TV and I see Julia and I said, "She's got a new boyfriend each week, and hell, I'm better-looking than any of those guys. I'm going to Hollywood and be that girl's boyfriend." So I went to Hollywood and I accomplished that feat in about a week. They signed me to a three-year contract to be Diahann Carroll's boyfriend on the Julia show.

FW: Yeah it holds up pretty well because it was a comedy show but it was not slapstick comedy. It didn't go overboard. I think Diahann Carroll's integrity wouldn't allow her to do anything that was slapstick comedy, and my character certainly would not do that kind of eye-rolling and teeth-grinning kind of comedy, which is where the black infusion into television seemed to go. All that shuffling kind of bullshit. I wasn't doing that, she wasn't doing that, so it was a very sophisticated black show.

FW: Not in my role. Maybe in Diahann Carroll's. But I think if Diahann Carroll ever had a problem, she would've spoke up and said something about it. My character was a stand-up kind of guy, which is what I am offscreen also, so I didn't do anything that anybody could say, "Hey man, why did you do that?" Because you don't want to come home and hear the boys on the street say, "Hey man, I saw this thing. You let this man kick your ass. Why'd you do that for?" Nobody ever said to me, "Hey man, I saw you in the Julia show, and why'd you do this and why'd you do that?" Your best audience is the one when you go back home, because the boys are going to lay it on you straight.

FW: I was still playing football when they talked me into doing that. I was the mole man coming out of the wall, and the only reason I agreed to do that was because I got to kick Captain Kirk's ass. So I came out of the wall and jumped on Captain Kirk, kicked his ass, and dragged him away as a captive.

FW: I came out to feel it, to see if they would accept me, and to prove to me how strong they were, they put me in that thing. I don't think I said a word. I don't think I said anything, I just jumped out and kicked his ass and then went back to football. [Laughs] So I still had no real in-roads, you know?

FW: I was at Twentieth Century Fox doing Julia. I'm in the commissary. A guy walks by. He says, "You're The Hammer, right?" I said, "Yeah." He said, "I'm doing a movie, I got a football game in it, and I don't know shit about football. Would you put all the football sequences together?" And I said, "Yeah, no problem." The guy who was talking to me was Robert Altman. I got 10 players from the pros and brought them in. I had a semi-pro football team in Santa Barbara. I brought all those guys down, so that all the hitting would be real, all the grunts would be real, and the only fake players in the movie were the actors.

FW: I'm watching it and I'm going, "How's this movie going to work?" Everybody's talking at the same time, everybody's overlapping each other. My whole training has been that you can't overlap. When someone else is talking, you've got to wait until they finish talking and then you talk. Robert Altman had everybody talking at the same time, so you had to see the movie at least five times to decipher what everybody else was saying. I think he was the first to create this overlapping dialogue by miking everybody. Everybody was miked so you talked when you felt like it. It was a great, innovative experience.

FW: Oh dude, that was my chance to show that I had boxing talent, because I was a Golden Gloves fighter coming out of Chicago and Gary, Indiana. So this was my time to show that I could do that. You've got to understand this is pre-Rocky. This is before Rocky even knew there was a Rocky. And I was doing my thing as a boxer, as a fighter, and I made it look good. I was copying a little Muhammad Ali stuff, and making it look authentic, and making it look real. But hey man, there's been a whole bunch of boxing movies since that and nobody's ever given me any accolades about doing B.J. Hammer.

FW: I don't remember that they even called him I think they called him "Hammerin' Hank." That's specific to baseball. They didn't call me "Hammerin' Hammer." It was The Hammer. Hank was baseball, and I was never a baseball fan. I don't watch sports that have incidental contact. Basketball, baseball You hit somebody and then you got to apologize for it? No, I never was a fan of incidental contact sports.

FW: Black Caesar was my interpretation of Edward G. Robinson's Little Caesar. You had a gangster with style, a gangster with class, a gangster who helps little old ladies across the street, a gangster who had morals. No drugs in my neighborhood. This was my interpretation of Little Caesar.

FW: It was an opportunity for me, but I was the only one who appeared to grasp the totality of it. Because first of all, I never bought in to the term "black exploitation," because I never knew who they were talking about. Who the hell was being exploited? The actors were being paid. The checks came on time. They were cashable. The fans were excited and thrilled because now all of a sudden you got the black guy still standing after the fight. The smoke clears and everybody else is dead except the black guy. But what they failed to grasp was you can't make them "Get Whitey" movies. This is not an opportunity to retaliate. This is not an opportunity to kill white people and come out a hero. In my films, I was an equal-opportunity ass-kicker. I'd kick white people's ass, black people's ass, pink people's ass, blue people's ass. If you were bad, you got your ass kicked. So my films never really fit into that genre. So I was able to survive after it finished. Because it only ran about five years. I was able to survive because I was an action star, not that "Get Whitey" guy. I was able to continue and move on to other action films, based on the notoriety I had achieved during the '70s.

FW: Three The Hard Way was in the middle of that era. Three The Hard Way was about bringing together three popular actors from that era: Fred Williamson, Jim Brown, Jim Kelley. Put the three top-grossing young black guys together in one film and for sure it's going to make money. Not only did it make money, but it's become a classic. I don't think there's less than two percent of the whole black community in America that has not seen Three The Hard Way.

FW: I worked with Jim Brown on several films because I understand more than major Hollywood that black actors are marketable. We may not be marketable in $100 million films, but if you are a low-budget filmmaker, making movies under $5 million, there is a market for Jim Brown, Bernie Casey, Richard Roundtree, Billy Dee Williams. There is an audience out there that still wants to see those actors, but Hollywood don't give a shit. If we made a movie, and it made $20 million gross? Hey, we can live off of that. But that's not even enough to pay Universal's light bill. They're not interested in the $20-$30 million grosses that we can make for them. But I am. As an independent guy, if I can make that, I'm a major success.

FW: It wasn't big. It cost more, that's all. The only difference between a $5 million film and a $10 million film is the cast. So in Original Gangstas, I put together the old school. I brought in Jim Brown, Pam Grier, Richard Roundtree, Ron O'Neal. I put old school into the film to show Hollywood that these stars are still marketable. And that was the whole purpose of putting them in the film was to show that they were marketable and that we could make money with them. But that went over Hollywood's head. They didn't give a shit.

FW: I think I had a big-time agent at that time and he thought it might be advantageous to do a film that had I think Rock Hudson was in it. He thought it would be advantageous to do a film of this nature. I wasn't really excited to do it, but they thought it would be good for my career to be playing opposite some big white names on the screen. It never really did nothing for me. I did the movie, but it didn't do nothing for me.

FW: I was a boxer. I was a heavyweight champ, I believe. A guy wanted to fight the heavyweight champ, and I was that champ. His fantasy was to fight for the heavyweight title. I think I kicked his ass, I'm not sure.

FW: No, again, at the time it was a very hot show, and I knew that if I was on the show I'd be seen by many people. So that's your first thought as an actor. You don't ever want to put yourself in a position where people say, "Whatever happened to The Hammer? I don't know man, I ain't seen him around. What you been doing?" You don't ever want to be in that situation where people have to say, "Whatever happened to The Hammer?" And so you do things occasionally. If you haven't been putting together the projects you want, you jump onto someone else's project just for the identity factor.

FW: Vegas Vampires was a film I did for fun. I didn't really make any money, I did it for fun. I had a good time in Vegas. They put me up at the Palms, and I had a good time. Lot of pretty ladies. Las Vegas was open to me, so I just had a good time doing something stupid and doing something fun, and trying to make it look good with no money. That's part of the challenge for me: making a film with no money, and still making it competitive.

FW: I make my own opportunities. The only reason I got into directing was because when I came into Hollywood I had this image of myself, of what I wanted to be. And I saw that Hollywood wasn't going to accept that. Wasn't going to let me be the hero. So I started directing and producing so I could make my own movies. I know damn well I ain't getting killed in my own damn movies.

FW: Black Kissinger is a film the Jamaicans want to do, but the Jamaicans have been dragging their feet. I'm not sure they want to do the film, and in the meantime I'm putting a project together called Spats. Spats is another interpretation of Edward G. Robinson. The modern-day gangster who doesn't deal in drugs, don't want drugs in the neighborhood, and is like the Godfather of the black community in Chicago. And his name is Spats.

FW: Oh yes, no doubt. It's about 95 percent. Part in Chicago, and part in Dubai My character Spats is now a retired gangster living in Dubai, having a good time enjoying the fruits of his labor when events happen back in Chicago that bring him out of retirement. He has to come back out and retaliate.

dracula a.d. 1972 (1972) - rotten tomatoes

dracula a.d. 1972 (1972) - rotten tomatoes

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The image is an example of a ticket confirmation email that AMC sent you when you purchased your ticket. Your Ticket Confirmation # is located under the header in your email that reads "Your Ticket Reservation Details". Just below that it reads "Ticket Confirmation#:" followed by a 10-digit number. This 10-digit number is your confirmation number.

Dracula A.D. 1972 isn't a great movie. But it is an undeniable hoot to watch especially if, like the Count, "you've got an eye for London's hot pants... " And who doesn't, really?

This isn't a terrific rationale for another horror flick but, given Miss Beacham's ability to heave, and her bosom to heave with, it will have to do.

The disappointment involving Dracula A.D. 1972 is that the title character never ventures outside his hiding ground, missing a rich opportunity for some interesting juxtapositions.

Dracula A.D. 1972 isn't a great movie. But it is an undeniable hoot to watch especially if, like the Count, "you've got an eye for London's hot pants... " And who doesn't, really?

This isn't a terrific rationale for another horror flick but, given Miss Beacham's ability to heave, and her bosom to heave with, it will have to do.

The disappointment involving Dracula A.D. 1972 is that the title character never ventures outside his hiding ground, missing a rich opportunity for some interesting juxtapositions.

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