west bengal - gold ore crusher

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flour mill - atta chakki, flour mill machine manufacturers & suppliers in india

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Odhav Industrial Estate, Ahmedabad No. 16, Royal Estate, Nikol Kathwada Ring Road, Behind Sahajand Business Park GIDC Main Road, Odhav Industrial Estate, Ahmedabad - 382430, Dist. Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Near Swad Kolhapur Restaurant, Chikhli, Pune Plot No. 1, Gat No. 1573, Dehu Alandi Road, Shelar Wasti Ambika Bhavan,1st Floor, Opposite Abhinav Vidyalay, Sagarli, MIDC, Phase 2, Dombivli East, Near Swad Kolhapur Restaurant, Chikhli, Pune - 412114, Dist. Pune, Maharashtra

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kcet 2020 chemistry paper questions and solutions

kcet 2020 chemistry paper questions and solutions

Students can download the KCET 2020 Question Paper with solutions for the Chemistry section from this page. The questions have been solved by our expert teachers and the solutions have been prepared in a detailed manner. This has been done to address the need of students to find the right answer to each of the questions asked in KCET 2020 Paper. The questions and solutions can be either viewed on our page directly or the document which is available in a PDF format can be downloaded for offline use. Practising KCET 2020 Chemistry Question Paper will help the candidates to study productively and at the same time analyze their performance in a more practical manner. Ultimately, aspirants will be able to face the exam with higher confidence and score more marks in the upcoming KCET exam.

Question 1. Aqueous solution of a salt (A) forms a dense white precipitate with BaCl2 solution. The precipitate dissolves in dilute HCl to produce a gas (B) which decolourises acidified KMnO4 solution. A and B respectively are:

Question 1. Aqueous solution of a salt (A) forms a dense white precipitate with BaCl2 solution. The precipitate dissolves in dilute HCl to produce a gas (B) which decolourises acidified KMnO4 solution. A and B respectively are:

The hydrides of group 15, 16 below the 3rd period, follows Dragos rule. The rule states that due to a large energy difference between the atomic orbitals, these compounds do not exhibit hybridization. Thus, PH3 will not exhibit hybridization and here the bond formation takes place due to the overlap of pure p-orbitals and s-orbitals. PH3 has a lone pair on the central P atom, which is absent in PH4+. Thus in PH3, there will be bond pair lone pair repulsion and this is the reason why the bond angle in PH3 is less than that of PH4+.

The coordination complex must be neutral. In all the options, the oxidation states of Pt are given such that we get an overall neutral complex. Again, while naming a complex, the cationic part should be named first followed by the anionic part. While naming the anionic part, the name of the metal should end with the suffix ate. From this, we can conclude that the IUPAC name of [Pt(NH3 )4 ][PtCl4] can be either (A) or (D). But the most common oxidation state of Pt is +2 and +4 and in both the parts of the complex, Pt has the same coordination number, and so, the correct option will be (D).

The rate of an SN 1 reaction is determined by the stability of the intermediate formed. In this case, the most stable intermediate formed would be for C6 H5 CH2 Cl and the intermediate formed would be C6 H5 CH2+. This intermediate is stabilised via resonance.

Primary alkyl halides/ benzyl halides react with alkoxide/phenoxide to give ethers via SN2 mechanism. This reaction is known as Williamsons ether synthesis. Aryl halides are the least reactive as the C-X bond has a partial double bond characteristic and hence, does not cleave easily. 3o halides do not give ethers as they undergo elimination in the presence of a strong base like alkoxides.

At least one -hydrogen should be present for an aldehyde or a ketone to undergo aldol reaction. The only compound that does not have even one -hydrogen is trichloroacetaldehyde, and hence, it does not undergo aldol reaction.

Photoelectric effect is the emission of electrons from a certain metal surface when it is irradiated with photons or light. The minimum frequency required to eject an electron from a metal surface is called threshold frequency. (o)

The number of electrons ejected increases with the increase in the intensity of incident light, an increase in the intensity of incident light means that the number of photons incident per unit surface area of the metal increases. (Provided the incident photons has its frequency more than the threshold frequency)

Functional isomers are compounds having the same molecular formula but different functional groups. Both the compounds given in option c are ethers. C2 H5 OC2 H5 and C3 H7 OCH3 are metamers, while the rest of the options are examples of functional isomers.

Greenhouse gases are those compounds which increase the temperature of the atmosphere by absorbing the IR rays of the sun. They include compounds like water vapour, CO2, NO2, O3, CFCs etc. O2 is not a greenhouse gas.

Silicon has 4 valence electrons whereas gallium has only 3 valence electrons. Thus, the dopant has less number of valence electrons in this case. Hence, silicon doped with gallium forms a p-type semiconductor.

The value of the constant A in the Debye Huckel Onsager equation, m = mo- AC depends on temperature, charges of the ions, the dielectric constant of the solvent and also the viscosity of the solvent. Here, since we are not given the solvent, we will assume that the solvent is the same for each case. Here, the deciding factor is the charge on the ions. Again, in NH4 Cl and NaBr, the charges on the ions are the same. Hence the pair of electrolytes that will possess the same value for the constant (A) will be NH4 Cl, NaBr.

Isotonic solutions are those which have the same osmotic pressure ( = iCRT). But here we have different concentration of the solutions and also they have different Vant Hoff factors (i). So the solutions for which the product of i and c will be the same and isotonic.

Question 50. Given, E0(Fe+3/Fe+2) = +0.76 V and Eo(I2/I- ) = +0.55 V. The equilibrium constant for the reaction taking place in the galvanic cell consisting of the above two electrodes is: [2.303RT/F=0.06]

Question 50. Given, E0(Fe+3/Fe+2) = +0.76 V and Eo(I2/I- ) = +0.55 V. The equilibrium constant for the reaction taking place in the galvanic cell consisting of the above two electrodes is: [2.303RT/F=0.06]

Platinum and gold lie at the bottom of the reactivity series. Thus it does not react with HNO3 and HCl. Again, Zn is more reactive than copper. Thus, copper will be displaced by Zn, if ZnSO4 is placed in a copper vessel. But Ag+ is less reactive than copper. Thus, copper will displace silver. The corresponding reaction is: 2AgNO3 + CuCu(NO3)2 + 2Ag

The expression of rate constant given in the question ( k=PZ e(-Ea/RT)) is according to Arrhenius theory. To speed up the reaction, we will have to decrease the value of Ea i.e. activation energy and will have to increase the value of temperature (T) and the number of collisions (Z).

When a gas is adsorbed on a solid surface, its movement is restricted leading to a decrease in the entropy of the gas i.e. S is negative. Now, we know that, for a process to be spontaneous, G should be negative.

The formula of copper pyrites is CuFeS2. In auto reduction, the sulphide ores of the metals which are less electropositive like Hg, Pb and Cu are heated in the air so as to convert a part of it to its oxides. These oxides then react with the remaining sulphide ore in the absence of air, to give the metal and sulphur dioxide. The corresponding reaction is:

understanding the gap between formal and informal e-waste recycling facilities in india - sciencedirect

understanding the gap between formal and informal e-waste recycling facilities in india - sciencedirect

Installed capacity of formal sector is below the estimated e-waste generation rate.Seven authorized e-waste recycling facilities are described in detail.Two unauthorized e-waste recycling facilities are described.Metals, plastic and glass can be recovered sustainably by the formal sector.Collection centers are inadequate for the formal sector.

Nowadays, old electrical and electronic gadgets are being replaced constantly by newer versions resulting in huge amounts of waste electronic and electrical products that are collectively termed e-waste. It is estimated that 95% of e-waste recycling in India is done by the informal sector at the cost of their health and the environment. Very little data and no descriptions of recycling processes in the formal sector in India were available in the literature. The objective of this study was to evaluate the status of formal and informal e-waste recycling facilities in India. Seven authorized e-waste handling facilities in West Bengal, Maharashtra, Karnataka and Delhi were visited and most were involved in dismantling work only. In all cases, metals, plastic and glass are recovered from e-waste in compliance with environmental legislation. Challenges faced by the formal sector include lack of awareness among people and very few collection centers throughout the country. Quantification of e-waste generated in India was difficult as imported second-hand electrical and electronic gadgets cannot be separated for electronic waste. There is no mechanism for collecting data regarding e-waste generation in the states or at the Central government level. It is likely that published estimates are based on the indigenous production and import of electrical and electronic goods. The current installed e-waste handling capacity of 11105 tons/year of e-waste in the country is woefully inadequate and needs to be enhanced as the minimum requirement is estimated to be 22105 tons/year of e-waste.

arsenic contamination of groundwater: a global synopsis with focus on the indian peninsula - sciencedirect

arsenic contamination of groundwater: a global synopsis with focus on the indian peninsula - sciencedirect

Nearly 108 countries of the globe affected by arsenic contamination in groundwater.More than 230 million people, including 180 million from Asia are at risk.More than 90% of arsenic pollution is inferred to be geogenic.Prolonged consumption of arsenic-contaminated groundwater results in severe health issues.

More than 2.5 billion people on the globe rely on groundwater for drinking and providing high-quality drinking water has become one of the major challenges of human society. Although groundwater is considered as safe, high concentrations of heavy metals like arsenic (As) can pose potential human health concerns and hazards. In this paper, we present an overview of the current scenario of arsenic contamination of groundwater in various countries across the globe with an emphasis on the Indian Peninsula. With several newly affected regions reported during the last decade, a significant increase has been observed in the global scenario of arsenic contamination. It is estimated that nearly 108 countries are affected by arsenic contamination in groundwater (with concentration beyond maximum permissible limit of 10 ppb recommended by the World Health Organization. The highest among these are from Asia (32) and Europe (31), followed by regions like Africa (20), North America (11), South America (9) and Australia (4). More than 230 million people worldwide, which include 180 million from Asia, are at risk of arsenic poisoning. Southeast Asian countries, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, China, Nepal, Vietnam, Burma, Thailand and Cambodia, are the most affected. In India, 20 states and 4 Union Territories have so far been affected by arsenic contamination in groundwater. An attempt to evaluate the correlation between arsenic poisoning and aquifer type shows that the groundwater extracted from unconsolidated sedimentary aquifers, particularly those which are located within the younger orogenic belts of the world, are the worst affected. More than 90% of arsenic pollution is inferred to be geogenic. We infer that alluvial sediments are the major source for arsenic contamination in groundwater and we postulate a strong relation with plate tectonic processes, mountain building, erosion and sedimentation. Prolonged consumption of arsenic-contaminated groundwater results in severe health issues like skin, lung, kidney and bladder cancer; coronary heart disease; bronchiectasis; hyperkeratosis and arsenicosis. Since the major source of arsenic in groundwater is of geogenic origin, the extend of pollution is complexly linked with aquifer geometry and aquifer properties of a region. Therefore, remedial measures are to be designed based on the source mineral, climatological and hydrogeological scenario of the affected region. The corrective measures available include removing arsenic from groundwater using filters, exploring deeper or alternative aquifers, treatment of the aquifer itself, dilution method by artificial recharge to groundwater, conjunctive use, and installation of nano-filter, among other procedures. The vast majority of people affected by arsenic contamination in the Asian countries are the poor who live in rural areas and are not aware of the arsenic poisoning and treatment protocols. Therefore, creating awareness and providing proper medical care to these people remain as a great challenge. Very few policy actions have been taken at international level over the past decade to reduce arsenic contamination in drinking water, with the goal of preventing toxic impacts on human health. We recommend that that United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and WHO should take stock of the global arsenic poisoning situation and launch a global drive to create awareness among people/medical professionals/health workers/administrators on this global concern.

Dr. E. Shaji is an Associate Professor & Research guide in the Dept. of Geology, University of Kerala, India. Prior to the University service he worked as a professional hydrogeologist (Scientist D) in Central Ground Water Board, Ministry of Water Resources, Govt of India. He has 23 years of professional/ industry/teaching experience in Geosciences with focus on groundwater and petrology. Three scholars took PhD with him, and guided several M.Phil. and M.Sc. students. He bagged Young Scientist Award from Kerala State Council for Science Technology and Environment, Govt. of Kerala. He is an Associate Editor of Geoscience Frontiers.

Professor M. Santosh is Foreign Expert at the China University of Geosciences, Beijing, China, Professor at the University of Adelaide, Australia and Emeritus Professor at the Kochi University, Japan. Founding Editor of Gondwana Research as well as the founding Secretary General of the International Association for Gondwana Research Editorial Advisor of Geoscience Frontiers. Receipt of National Mineral Award, Outstanding Geologist Award, Thomson Reuters Research Front Award and Global Talent award. He was recognized as Highly Cited Researcher continuously during last four years.

K.V. Sarath is a Research Fellow in the Department of Geology, University of Kerala, India. He completed his Masters degree in Geology from Central University of Kerala and Bachelors degree in Geology from the Kannur University. His research interests include Hydrogeology, Petrology, Geochemistry and GIS/ Remote sensing.

Pranav Prakash is a Research Scholar in the Department of Geology, University of Kerala. He completed his Masters degree in Applied Geology from Pondicherry University and Bachelors degree in Geology from the University of Kerala. His research interests include Hydrogeology, Sedimentology, Natural resources Management and GIS/ Remote sensing.

V. Deepchand is a Research Scholar in the Department of Geology, University of Kerala, India. He completed his M.Phil and Masters degree in Geology from University of Kerala and Bachelors degree in Geology from Kannur University. His research interests include Petrology, Geochemistry, Hydrogeology and GIS.

B.V. Divya is a Research fellow in the Department of Geology, University of Kerala. She received her M.Phil and Masters degree in Geology from the University of Kerala and Central University of Kerala respectively and Bachelors degree in Geology from Kannur University. Her research interests are in the field of Hydrogeology, Natural Resources Management and GIS/ Remote sensing.

mamata 3.0 and india inc: will west bengal cm mamata banerjee warm up to big investors in her third term? - the economic times

mamata 3.0 and india inc: will west bengal cm mamata banerjee warm up to big investors in her third term? - the economic times

It appears India Inc is in a dilemma. It cant perpetually ignore an important market in the east which is located close to raw materials, be it coal or iron ore, and which houses a huge talent pool of human resources. So what does corporate India expect from the newly installed government in the state?

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