flotation reagents

flotation reagents

This data on chemicals, and mixtures of chemicals, commonly known as reagents, is presented for the purpose of acquainting those interested in frothflotation with some of the more common reagents and their various uses.

Flotation as a concentration process has been extensively used for a number of years. However, little is known of it as an exact science, although, various investigators have been and are doing much to place it on a more scientific basis. This, of course, is a very difficult undertaking when one appreciates how ore deposits were formed and the vast number of mineral combinations existing in nature. Experience obtained from examining and testing ores from all over the world indicates that no two ores are exactly alike. Consequently, aside from a few fundamental principles regarding flotation and the use of reagents, it is generally agreed each ore must be considered a problem for the metallurgist to solve before any attempt is made to go ahead with the selection and design of a flotation plant.

Flotation reagents may be roughly classified, according to their function, into the following groups: Frothers, Promoters, Depressants, Activators, Sulphidizers, Regulators. The order of these groups is no indication of their relative importance; and it is common for some reagents to fall into more than one group.

The function of frothers in flotation is that of building the froth which serves as the buoyant medium in the separation of the floatable from the non-floatable minerals. Frothers accomplish this by lowering the surface tension of the liquid which in turn permits air rising through the pulp to accumulate at the surface in bubble form.

The character of the froth can be controlled by the type of frother. Brittle froths, those which break down readily, are obtained by the alcohol frothers. Frothers such as the coal tar creosotes produce a tough bubble which may be desirable for certain separations.

Flotation machine aeration also determines to a certain extent the character of the froth. Finely divided air bubbles thoroughly diffused through the pulp are much more effective than when the same volume of air is in larger bubbles.

In practice the most widely used frothers are pine oil and cresylic acid, although, some of the higher alcohols are gradually gaining favor because of their uniformity and low price. The frothers used depends somewhat upon the location. For instance, in Australia eucalyptus oil is commonly usedbecause an abundant supply is available from the tree native to that country.

Frothers are usually added to the pulp just before its entrance into the flotation machine. The quantity of frother varies with the nature of the ore and the purity of the water. In general from .05 to .20 lbs. per ton of ore are required. Some frothers are more effective if added in small amounts at various points in the flotation machine circuit.

Overdoses of frother should be avoided. Up to a certain point increasing the amount of frother will gradually increase the froth produced. Beyond this, however, further increases will actually decrease the amount of froth until none at all is produced. Finally, as the excess works out of the system the froth runs wild and this is a nuisance until corrected.

Not enough frother causes too fragile a froth which has a tendency to break and drop the mineral load. No bare spots should appear at the cell surface, and pulp level should not be too close to the overflow lip, at least in the cells from which the final cleaned concentrate is removed.

A good flotation frother must be cheap and easily obtainable. It must not ionize to any appreciable extent. It must be an organic substance. Chemically a frother consists of molecules containing two groups having opposite properties. One part of the molecule must be polar in order to attract water while the other part must be non-polar to repel water. The polar group in the molecule preferably should contain oxygen in the form of hydroxyl (OH), carboxyl (COOH), carbonyl (CO); or nitrogen in the amine (NH2) or the nitrile form. All of these characteristics are possessed by certain wood oils such as pine oil and eucalyptus oil, by certain of the higher alcohols, and by cresylic acid.

The function of promoters in flotation is to increase the floatability of minerals in order to effect their separation from the undesirable mineral fraction, commonly known as gangue. Actuallywhat happens is that the inherent difference in wettability among minerals is increased and as a result the floatability of the more non-wettable minerals is increased to the point where they have an attraction for the air bubbles rising to the surface of the pulp. In practical operation the function of promoters may be considered two-fold: namely, to collect and select. Certain of the xanthates, for instance, possess both collective and selective powers to a high degree, and it is reagents such as these that have made possible some of the more difficult separations. In bulk flotation all of the sulphide minerals are collected and floated off together while the gangue remains unaffected and is rejected as tailing. Non- selective promoters serve very well for this purpose. Selective or differential flotation, on the other hand, calls for promoters which are highly selective or whose collecting power may be modified by change in pulp pH (alkalinity or acidity), or some other physical or chemical condition.

The common promoters for metallic flotation are xanthates, aerofloats, minerec, and thiocarbanilide. Soaps, fatty acids, and amines are commonly used for non-metallic minerals such as fluorspar, phosphate, quartz, felpsar, etc.

Promoters are generally added to the conditioner ahead of flotation to provide the time interval required for reaction with the pulp. Some promoters are slower in their action and in such case are added directly to the grinding circuit. Promoters which are fast acting or have some frothing ability are at times added directly to the flotation machine, as required, usually at several points. This practice is commonly known as stage addition of reagents.

The quantity of promoter depends on the character and amount of mineral to be floated, and in general for sulphide or metallic minerals .01 to .20 lbs. per ton of ore are required. Flotation of metallic oxides and non-metallic minerals usually require larger quantities of promoter, and in the case of fatty acids the range is from 0.5 to 2.5 lbs. per ton.

The function of depressants is to prevent, temporarily, or sometimes permanently, the flotation of certain minerals without preventing the desired mineral from being readily floated. Depressants are sometimes referred to as inhibitors.

Lime, sodium sulphite, cyanide, and dichromate are among the best known common depressants. Among organic depressants, starch and glue find widest application. If added in sufficient quantity starch will often depress all the minerals present in an ore pulp. Among the inorganic depressants, lime is the cheapest and best for iron sulphides, while zinc sulphate, sodium cyanide, and sodium sulphite depress zinc sulphide. Sodium silicate, quebracho, and also cyanide are commondepressants in non-metallic flotation.

Depressants are generally added to the grinding circuit or conditioner usually before addition of promoting and frothing reagents. They may also be added direct to the flotation cleaner circuit particularly on complex ores when it is difficult to make a clean cut separation or where considerable gangue may be carried over mechanically into the cleaning circuit as in flotation of fluorspar. Quantity of depressants required depends on the nature of the ore treated and should be determined by actual test. For instance, lime required to depress pyrite may vary from 1 to 10 lbs. a ton.

The function of activators is to render floatable those minerals which normally do not respond to the action of promoters. Activators also serve to render floatable again minerals which have been temporarily depressed in selective flotation. Sphalerite depressed with cyanide and zinc sulphate can be activated with copper sulphate and it will then respond to treatment like a normal sulphide. Stibnite, the antimony sulphide mineral, responds much better to flotation after being activated with lead nitrate.

The theory generally accepted on activation is that the activating substance, generally a metallic salt, reacts with the mineral surface to form on it a new surface more favorable to the action of a promoter. This also applies to non-metallic minerals.

Activators are usually added to the conditioner ahead of flotation and in general the time of contact should be carefully determined. Amounts required will vary with the condition of the ore treated. In the case of zinc ore previously depressed with zinc sulphate and cyanide, from 0.5 to 2.0 of copper sulphate may be required for complete activation. Quantities required should always be determined by test.

The most widely used sulphidizer is sodium sulphide, which is commonly used in the flotation of lead carbonate ores and also slightly tarnished sulphides such as pyrite and galena. In the sulphidization of ores containing precious metals careful control must be exercised as in some instances sodium sulphide has been known to havea depressing effect on flotation of metallics. In such cases it is advisable to remove the precious metals ahead of the sulphidization step.

Sulphidizers are usually fed into the conditioner just ahead of the flotation circuit. The quantity required varies with the characteristics of the ore and may range from .5 to 5 lbs. per ton. Conditioning time should be carefully determined and an excess of sulphidizing reagent avoided.

The function of regulators is to modify the alkalinity or acidity in flotation circuits, which is commonly measured in terms of hydrogen ion concentration, or pH. Modifying the pH of a pulp has a pronounced effect on the action of flotation reagents and is one of the important means of making otherwise difficult separations possible.

Soluble salts may have their source in the ore or water, or both, and in precipitating them out of solution they generally become inert to the action of flotation reagents. Soluble salts have a tendency to combine with promoters thus withdrawing a certain proportion of the reagents from action on the mineral to be floated. Removal of the deleterious salts therefore makes possible a reduction in the amount of reagent, required. Complexing soluble salts by keeping them in solution yet inert to the reagents is in some cases desirable.

Mineral surfaces may vary according to pulp pH conditions as many of the regulators appear either directly or indirectly to have a cleansing effect on the mineral particle. This brings about more effective action on the part of promoters and other reagents, and in turn increases selectivity.

pH control by action of regulators is in some cases very effective in depressing certain minerals. Lime, for instance, will depress pyrite, and sodiumsilicate is excellent for dispersing and preventing quartz from floating. It is necessary, however, to have a definite concentration of the reagents for best results.

The common regulators are lime, soda ash, and sodium silicate for alkaline circuits, and sulphuric acid for acid circuits. Many other reagents are used for this important function. The separation required and character of ore will determine which regulators are best suited. In general, from an operating standpoint, it is preferable to use a neutral or alkaline circuit, but in some instances it is only possible to obtain results in an acid circuit which then will require the use of special equipment to withstand corrosion. Flotation of non-metallic minerals is at times more effective in an acid circuit as in the case of feldspar and quartz. The pulp has to be regulated to a low pH by means of hydrofluoric acid before any degree of selectivity is possible between the two minerals.

Regulators are fed generally to the grinding circuit or to the conditioner ahead of flotation and before addition of promoters and activators. The amounts required will vary with the character of the ore and separation desired. In the event an excessive quantity of regulator is required to obtain the desired pH it may be advisable to consider removing the soluble salts by water washing in order to bring reagent cost within reason.

The tables on the following pages have been prepared to present in brief form pertinent information on a few of the more common reagents now beingused in the flotation of metallic and non-metallic minerals. A brief explanation of the headings in the table is as follows:

Usual Method of Feeding: Whether in dry or liquid form. A large number of reagents are available in liquid form and naturally are best handled in wet reagent feeders, either full strength or diluted for greater accuracy in feeding. Many dry reagents are best handled in solution form and in such cases common solution strengths are specified in percent under this heading. A 10% water solution of a reagent means 10 lbs. of dry reagent dissolved in 90 lbs. of water to make 100 lbs. of solution. Some dry reagents, because of insolubility or other conditions, must be fed dry. This is usually done by belt or cone type feeders designed especially for this service to give accurate and uniform feed rates.

Pasty, viscous, insoluble reagents present a problem in handling and are generally dispersed by intense agitation with water to form emulsions which can then be fed in the usual manner with a wet reagent feederor using a pump.

Price Per Lb.: Prices shown are approximate and in general apply to drum lots and larger quantities F.O.B. factory. This information is very useful whenmaking tests to determine the lowest cost satisfactory reagent combination for a specific ore. Some ores will not justify reagent expenditures beyond a certain limit, and in this case less expensive reagents must be given first consideration.

Uses: General use for each reagent as given is determined from experience by various investigators. Although the Equipment Company uses a large number of these reagents in conducting test work on ores received from all parts of the world, opinion, data, or recommendations contained herein are not necessarily based on our findings, but are data published by companies engaged in the manufacture of those reagents.

The ore testing Laboratory of 911metallurgist, in the selection of reagents for the flotation of various types of ores, uses that combination which gives the best results, irrespective of manufacturer of the reagents. The data presented on the following tables should be useful in selecting reagents for trials and tests, although new uses, new reagents, and new combinations are continually being discovered.

The consumption of flotation reagents is usually designated in lbs. per ton of ore treated. The most common way of determining the amount of reagent being used is to measure or weigh the amount being fed per. unit of time, say one minute. Knowing the amount of ore being treated per unit of time, the amount of reagent may then be converted into pounds per ton.

The tables below will be useful in obtaining reagent feed rates and quantities used per day under varying conditions. The common method of measurement is in cc (cubic centimetres) per minute. The tables are based on one cc of water weighing one gram. A correction therefore will be necessary for liquid reagents weighing more or less than water. Dry reagents may be weighed directly in grams per min. which in the tables is interchangeable with cc per min.

In the table on the opposite page the 100% column refers to undiluted flotation reagents such as lime, soda ash and liquids with a specific gravity of 1.00. Ninety-two per cent is usually used for light pine oils, 27 per cent for a saturated solution of copper sulphate and 14 per cent for TT mixture (thiocarbanilide dissolved in orthotoluidine). The other percentages are for solutions of other frequently used reagents such as xanthates, cyanide, etc.

The action of promoting reagents in increasing the contact-angle at a water/mineral surface implies an increase in the interfacial tension and, therefore, a condition of increased molecularstrain in the layer of water surrounding the particle. If two such mineral particles be brought together, the strain areas enveloping them will coalesce in the reduction of the tensionary system to a minimum. In effect, the particles will be pressed together. Many such contacts normally occur in a pulp before and during flotation, with the result that the floatable minerals of sufficiently high contact-angle are gathered together into flocks consisting of numbers of mineral particles. This action is termed flocculation , and obviously is greatly increased by agitation.

The reverse action, that of deflocculation , takes place when complete wetting occurs, and no appreciable interfacial tension exists. Under these conditions there is nothing to keep two particles of ore in contact should they collide, since no strain area surrounds them ; they therefore remain in individual suspension in the pulp.

Since substances which can be flocculated can usually be floated, and vice versa, the terms flocculated and deflocculated have become more or less synonymous with floatable and unfloatable , and should be understood in this sense, even though particles of ore often become unfloatable in practice while still slightly flocculatedthat is, before the point of actual deflocculation has been reached.

Here is a ListFlotation Reagents & Chemicals prepared to present in brief form pertinent information on a few of the more common reagents now being used in the flotation of metallic and non-metallic minerals. A brief explanation of the headings in the table is as follows:

Usual Method of Feeding: Whether in dry or liquid form. A large number of reagents are available in liquid form and naturally are best handled in wet reagent feeders, either full strength or diluted for greater accuracy in feeding. Many dry reagents are best handled in solution form and in such cases common solution strengths are specified in percent under this heading. A 10% water solution of a reagent means 10 lbs. of dry reagent dissolved in 90 lbs. of water to make 100 lbs. of solution. Some dry reagents, because of insolubility or other conditions, must be fed dry. This is usually done by belt or cone type feeders designed especially for this service to give accurate and uniform feed rates.

Pasty, viscous, insoluble reagents present a problem in handling and are generally dispersed by intense agitation with water to form emulsions which can then be fed in the usual manner with a wet reagent feeder.

The performance of froth flotation cells is affected by changes in unit load, feed quality, flotation reagent dosages, and the cell operating parameters of pulp level and aeration rates. In order to assure that the flotation cells are operating at maximum efficiency, the flotation reagent dosages should be adjusted after every change in feed rate or quality. In some plants, a considerable portion of the operators time is devoted to making these adjustments. In other cases, recoverable coal is lost to the slurry impoundment and flotation reagent is wasted due to operator neglect. Accurate and reliable processing equipment and instrumentation is required to provide the operator with real-time feedback and assist in optimizing froth cell efficiency.

This process of optimizing froth cell efficiency starts with a well-designed flotation reagent delivery system. The flotation reagent pumps should be equipped with variable-speed drives so that the rates can be adjusted easily without having to change the stroke setting. The provision for remotely changing the reagent pump output from the control room assists in optimizing cell performance. The frother delivery line should include a calibration cylinder for easily correlating pump output with the frother delivery rate. Our experience has shown that diaphragm metering pumps of stainless steel construction give reliable, long-term service. Duplex pumps are used to deliver a constant frother-to-collector ratio over the range of plant operating conditions.

In most applications, the flotation reagent addition rate is set by the plant operator. The flotation reagents can be added in a feed-forward fashion based on the plant raw coal tonnage. Automatic feedback control of the flotation reagent addition rates has been lacking due to the unavailability of sensors for determining the quality of the froth cell tailings. Expensive nuclear-based sensors have been tried with limited success. Other control schemes have measured the solids concentrations of the feed, product, and tailings streams and calculated the froth cell yield based on an overall material balance. This method is susceptible to errors due to fluctuations in the feed ash content and inaccuracies in the measurement device.

A series of simple math models have been developed to assist in the engineering analysis of batch lab data taken in a time-recovery fashion. The emphasis is to separate the over-all effect of a reagent or operating condition change into two portions : the potential recovery achievable with the system at long times of flotation, R, and a measure of the rate at which this potential can be achieved, K.

Such patterns in R and K with changing conditions assist the engineer to make logical judgements on plant improvement studies. Standard laboratory procedures usually concentrate on identifying some form of equilibrium recovery in a standard time frame but often overlook the rate profile at which this recovery was achieved. Study has shown that in some plants, at least, changes in the rate, K, are more important relative to over-all plant performance than changes in the lab measured recovery, R. Thus the R-K analysis can serve to improve the engineering understanding of how to use lab data for plant work. Long term plant experience has also shown that picking reagent systems having higher K values associated can be beneficial even when the plant, on the average, is not experiencing rate of mass removal problems. This is due to the cycling or instabilities that can and do exist in industrial circuits.

It is also important to note that the R-K approach does not eliminate the need for surface chemistry principles and characterization. Such principles and knowledge are required to logically select and understand potential reagent systems and conditions of change in flotation. Without this, reagent selection is quickly reduced to a completely Edisonian approach which is obviously inefficient. What the R-K analysis does is to provide additional information on a system in a critical stage of scale-up (from the lab to the plant) in a form (equilibrium recovery and rate of mass removal) which are interpretable to the engineer who has to make the change work.

The influence of operating conditions such as pH, temperature of feed water, degree of grind, air flow rate, degree of agitation, etc. have been characterized using the R-K approach with clear patterns evolving.

The effect of collector type and concentration on a wide variety of ore types have been studied with generally rather clear and sometimes rather significant patterns in R and K. The quantitative ability to analyze collector performance from the lab to the plant using the R-K profiles has been good.

The effect of frother type on various ores has also been undertaken with good success in differentiating between the qualitative directions and effects involved. However, the actual concentrations required in plants have not, in at least some tests, been accurately predicted. Thus further work remains in this area but in almost all cases the qualitative information on frothers that has been gained has proven very valuable in test work as a guide.

home - the dive bomb

home - the dive bomb

The patent pending Dive Bomb offers comfort and a true level of safety to snorkelers, free divers and boaters alike. Its high visibility makes it a great location marker for swimmers unseen below the surface. Made from closed cell polyethylene foam, the same material many life vests use. This gives The Dive Bomb highly effective flotation. The innovative design of The Dive Bomb allows the snorkeler, or free diver, the ability to shed their flotation and dive to a depth of 12 feet or more. Unlike a flotation vest which makes it impossible to dive while wearing. What makes The Dive bomb unique is its self retracting tether which keeps it straight above you, always marking your location. When you surface it offers that well deserved rest before your next dive.

The exclusive patent pending Dive Bomb tethering system is self retracting. This gives the diver freedom of movement while minimizing the possibility of entanglement, unlike having a rope tied to a float. It also features a replaceable breakaway safety link between wrist and tether for added safety. This a must have for snorkeling the reefs, scalloping or hunting some bugs.

Our blogs are filled with helpful insights. Many of our satisfied customers have told us how The Dive Bomb has given them peace of mind. Especially for family and friends that go snorkeling with them. Whether your driving a boat through snorkel infested waters or are below the surface harvesting the nights catch of the day. You can rest assured your location will be easily seen.

flotation foam for boats (types, benefits, recommendations)

flotation foam for boats (types, benefits, recommendations)

Flotation foam is an important but often overlooked component for boat prep. It serves multiple purposes that boat owners often dont consider but it could cost you in the long run. But many boaters only know that flotation foams exists but dont know what its used for and how it can benefit them to have some foam in their boat.

What are the benefits of flotation foam for boats? Flotation foam will provide more-permanent flotation for boats and docks, provide thermal insulation which is important for use in hot and cold extreme that comes with year-round boat care, and for sound deadening. Flotation foam is typically applied to boat hulls either through open or closed-cell mats and blocks or through special marine pour foam which forms a mechanical seal with the hull of boats. Each of these methods has its purposed and benefits for why they should be considered.

I know this is a bit random, but if you ever wanted to go on a guided or chartered fishing trip in freshwater or saltwater, you should check out Fishing Booker. They are the leading database of certified and professional fishing guides at the guaranteed lowest prices. They have countless listings for such dream destinations as the Florida Keys, Corpus Christi, Great Lakes, San Diego, Central America, Montana, and many more. Click here to visit Fishing Booker and book your trip of a lifetime at very affordable prices.

Flotation foam is any type of foam designed or repurposed for use in marine vessels and docks for the purpose of flotation enhancement, thermal insulation, and for sound deadening. You can find specially designed boat flotation options in the form of pourable foam, closed-cell foam mats or blocks, and even boat foam pods that attach to the outside of the boat and rest in the water.

These all serve a purpose and are great options. People also repurpose foam they have for other non-marine projects such as hollow or solid-core swimming noodles and Styrofoam to provide added flotation and sound deadening for their vessels.

I prefer pourable foam because it can form a mechanical bond with aluminum hulls that hold it in place and closed-cell foam sheets because the closed-cell foam is waterproof and wont absorb water as long as it remains in good condition.

I believe a combination of pourable foam and closed-cell foam sheets is the ideal fit for most boats. That is my personal preference based on what Ive seen using some other foam types as time and use passes. I will explain later how to combine these two types of foam for your boat.

To an extent, adding foam to a boat will help it float but perhaps in a way different than many people assume. The common train of thought is that a boat filled with flotation foam will float better than a boat without foam. There may be a shred of truth to that and perhaps more scientific justification than Im giving it credit for.

Foam on board may help a boat sit a smidge higher in the water than one without it, but that is not the purpose of the foam as a flotation device. The foam is there to literally prevent the boat from sinking.

On the other hand, a boat lined with foam will still take on water and will sit progressively lower and lower on top of the water but it will greatly delay the boat from sinking. It should give you enough time to reach safety, radio for help and wait for rescue, or make it to shore before the boat goes under.

First and foremost, you add foam to keep a boat from sinking. As we have already discussed, whether it helps a boat sit higher in the water is debatable, but the foam can literally prevent a boat already taking on water from going under which can save your gear and potentially your life.

Imagining yourself in a small boat in the ocean that is going down quick would have to be one of the loneliest and scariest feelings. I have worked with commercial fishermen who were in a similar situation and managed to get rescued in time. Having a ton of foam on board could literally save your life.

Polyurethane spray or pour foam seems to be the most popular way to insulate spaces aboard a vessel. Thermal insulation is really important on larger boats, especially those with frozen or cool storage areas.

What may sound like an annoying bump from above the water can really amplify and carry underwater. Any footstep, weight shift, and even rocking in the waves will really make it sound so much louder if you dont add foam. Flotation foam not only prevents a boat from sinking but also really dampens or deadens sound.

You could drop your rod on the deck of a well-foamed hull and fish wont even notice but if you did the same thing without foam, you may need to relocate somewhere else to find non-spooked fish. Trust me, you will really benefit from padding the deck of your small aluminum or wooden boat with flotation foam if you are serious about fishing.

Avoid using polystyrene because it soaks up water. Plus, it can easily absorb petrochemicals such as petroleum and a few types of glue. This makes it very dangerous in case a gas leak occurs near this foam. This foamcan soak up the gas becoming a serious fire hazard.

Polyurethane is the better choice because it does not absorb water or petrochemicals. Another advantage of polyurethane is that it is available in liquid form and when you pour it into an air chamber, it can mold perfectly to the boat.

Polyethylene is another great choice for flotation foam. It works as good as polyurethane but without any of the abrasion risk. Polyethylene can be compressed or even bent to fit curved places while polyurethane is rigid.

I have not tested every flotation foam on the market and neither have most people. I have tested the following two pourable foam options and found them easy to use and implement. I would recommend them but the truth is that most pourable foam option will do fine as long as you follow the directions and apply it very quickly after mixing.

Also, I wont make any recommendations for sheet or block foam because you can simply go to your hardware store for that and it will help to see examples in person to make sure you get sheets that are the right density and thickness.

Flotation foam can be an important addition for sink-proofing, thermal insulation, and soundproofing such boats as sailboats, jon boats, aluminum v-hull fishing boats, speed boats, canoes, bass boats, and pontoon boats. It can also help keep floating docks riding higher in the water when loaded down with weight.

The closed-cell foam used on boats is designed to remain water-proof under normal circumstances. There have numerous scientific studies showing that closed-cell foam is better resistant to water permeation than closed-cell including a 2007 study by Sun & Zhang.

But numerous accounts of boaters who replaced closed-cell foam after years of wear and tear show that even this type of foam can absorb water once the protective outer layer is compromised by tiny cuts, abrasions, or sun damage. Long story short, closed-cell foam can absorb water if left submerged in water in a confined space for a long duration of time.

Furthermore, if your boat springs a leak, the foam on-board will keep your boat floating much longer than not having foam which will make it a lot more stable as you motor to safety and also afloat long enough to make shore. For a complete breakdown on how to make a jon boat more stable, check out this link.

I am an avid angler and outdoorsman. I grew up fishing for anything that swims but really cut my teeth fishing for trout, chain pickerel, bass, and bullheads in my teenage years. Since then, I've lived across the country and have really taken that passion for fishing to a new level.

Circle hooks are gaining in popularity across the nation because of their efficiency and effectiveness. But circle hooks have specific applications where they are best suited. Still many others want...

I am an avid angler and outdoorsman. I grew up fishing for anything that swims but really cut my teeth fishing for trout, chain pickerel, bass, and bullheads in my teenage years. Since then, I've lived across the country and have really taken that passion for fishing to a new level.

This site is owned and operated by Eric Matechak. FreshwaterFishingAdvice is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. FreshwaterFishingAdvice is compensated for referring traffic and business to these companies.

Get in Touch with Mechanic
Related Products
Recent Posts
  1. flotations in eastern cape

  2. high end mineral flotation machine sell at a loss in mexico

  3. flotation reagent with machinery trading long working life

  4. flotation machine kit

  5. operating mechanical copper flotation

  6. southeast asia tangible benefits medium bentonite flotation machine for sale

  7. flotation beneficiation plant in indonesia

  8. what is flotation used for

  9. agitair flotation machine

  10. type of flotation machine flotation machine manufacturer

  11. iron ore beneficiation plant in sail bsp

  12. palm kernel shell separation

  13. mining machine importers

  14. stone crusher industry in india

  15. assam grinding machine for talcum powder

  16. types of cylindrical grinding machine in tamil nadu

  17. rio de janeiro efficient small gypsum classifier

  18. cement production cost

  19. gold mining machinery uses gold mining machinery

  20. portable granite sand washing machine in nicaragua