hardinge conical ball mill

hardinge conical ball mill

The Hardinge Ball Mill consists of three sections. After the usual type of trunnion bearing the mill consists of a short conical section showing a sharp drop from feed entrance to maximum mill radius. A cylindrical section of varying length then follows and toward the discharge end connects with a comparatively long and conical section sloping, at considerably less pitch than at the feed end, toward the discharge. In principle it has been claimed that a separation and grading of the balls in sizes, resulting in a corresponding graduation in the force of the crushing blow, occurred in the mill to the extent that single-passage crushing might be advocated. The successive reduction of the ore particle from rock to sand or gravel to slime was pictured as an actual achievement and as a logical departure from the normal current practice with cylindrical mills. These views havebeen proved somewhat fallacious. The balls do not segregate to the extent assumed, and careful investigation has proved that the discharge sections may consist of balls of a larger average size than the medium of the balls used in the mill. A. F. Taggart (Trans. A. I. M. E., Sept., 1917) has also demonstrated that efficient Hardinge-mill operation cannot be effected by single-passage grinding, and a return classification system is indicated as desirable, as with the cylindrical mill. This would seem effectively to dispose of the graduated blow theory. Standard Sizes of Hardinge Mills are given in Table XLVII. A summarized statement of data, consisting of the average performance of a number of these machines, is given in Table XLVIII.

The HARDINGE MILL is the invention of Mr. H. W. Hardinge, a ConsultingMetallurgistof over thirty-five years experience in metallurgical work, who found it necessary to devise a machine which would be more efficient than the existing machines in use, such as rolls, cylindrical ball and tube mills, roller mills, hammer mills, and various types of high speed pulverizers. The Conical Mill is now being used in all parts of the World, having substituted these latter types of machines in the grinding of ores and other materials. Hardinge Conical Ball Mills are used to do the work of any combination of the above machines and will produce the desired results, depending upon the size and type of mill used.

Grinding can be done either wet or dry, and on account of the Conical shape of a Hardinge Mill, a positive discharge can be obtained without the use of internal screens, such as are employed with practically all high speed pulverizers and machines of the ordinary ball mill type.

It is a generally recognized fact that for economic reduction of any material, it is desirable to perform such reduction in steps or stages, removing that material which is sufficiently fine as soon as it is reduced and grinding it still finer in some device more adaptable to this finer reduction. It has been found that by so doing, the efficiency of the grinding machinery is increased, since material which is already finished and not removed interferes with the reduction of the coarser particles. This general principle is applied in the laboratory for the grinding of samples, where, after the material has been ground for a short time, it is screened for the purpose of removing the finished particles and the coarser material is then returned for further reduction.

Another application on a larger scale is the use of crushers or rolls in series with screens or trommels between them for removing finished or semi-finished material. It was with this idea in mind and with a realization that the machinery in use did not embody this principle, that the Conical Mill was devised.

In the Hardinge Mills, due to the action of the cones, the coarse material on entering the machine gravitates to the point of largest diameter. Here it comes in contact with, and is broken by, the largest balls moving at the highest velocity and falling from the greatest height. As the particles are broken, they automatically work their way forward, being subjected to a gradually diminishing breaking and crushing effect as they decrease in size. The particles undergoing reduction reach the required degree of fineness and arrive at the discharge end of the mill at the same time. Thus it is seen that this automatic classification, both of the material being reduced and of the grinding mediums, as well as their height of fall, proportions the energy expended or exerted in crushing to the work required to be performed. In this way, we obtain an ideal step or stage reduction in a single machine, which is conducive to a maximum crushing effect for a minimum expenditure of power.

This classification of the material undergoing reduction, as well as of the grinding bodies, in which it is seen that in the largest diameter of the mill, the incoming feed is acted upon by the largest balls with the greatest superincumbent weight, the greatest height of fall, and the greatest peripheral speed. The grinding bodies and the crushing forces exerted are gradually reduced, as well as the size of the material undergoing reduction, as the discharge end is reached.

used hardinge ball mills for sale | machinio

used hardinge ball mills for sale | machinio

- 6 x 6 ft Hardinge Koppers ball mill - Configured for wet grinding and overflow discharge - Access hatch - Used liners installed - 75 HP induction motor - Hamilton gear reducer - 24 RPM final mill speed - Discha...

- Mill Shell - Bull Gear, Single Helical - 16 face, 144 Teeth per 1/2 section - Feed head and trunnion liner - Discharge head and trunnion liner - Trunnion base, cap, and babbitt bearing insert - New pinion asse...

9.5 x 12 ft Hardinge Ball/Rod Mill: - 13 inch wide single helical pinion and ring gear - 267 tooth bull gear - 19 tooth pinion - 49 x 13.5 inch trunnion bearings provided with new babbitt inserts - Mill feed and ...

hardinge - used machines | machine hub

hardinge - used machines | machine hub

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hardinge conical mill - grinding efficiency compared

hardinge conical mill - grinding efficiency compared

Nearly every mining and metallurgical engineer will recall his early experience and method of producing step- or stage- reduction in preparing ore-samples for assay, in which he employed idea, step- or stage-reduction simply because it was a self-evident fact that it would be easier to break coarse ore with a hammer than it would be to roll it back and forth under the muller, and after having reduced it to a size easy for a rubbing or bucking division he then placed it under the muller on the bucking-board and further reduced it in proportion to the physical energy he wished to expend, which was generally the minimum to produce results. After this step in our experience we seem to have ceased to consider stage-reduction as mechanically essential, probably because it did not apply to individual exertion. Moreover, we did not retain the mass under the muller until it was all reduced to pass the 80-mesh assay-office screen, but practiced further step-reduction by screening out the fine in order that it should not interfere with subsequent work, replacing the coarse for further reduction on the bucking-board.

It was many years after the bucking-board stage of metallurgical practice that we were brought to a full realization that there was a more economical method in applying the crushing forces usually employed in metallurgical work by taking advantage of this individual experience and applying it to mechanical ends. We have made some advance to this end in bringing out the conical ball-and-pebble milla device which fairly well automatically adjusts power to the results obtained, mechanically repeating the bucking-board experience. In the action of the conical mill, theory is evolved from practice, rather than practice from theory, as is commonly the case.

The conical mill, or what is more commonly known as the Hardinge mill, is one of those inventions which, if not fathered by actual necessity, was at least induced by the desire to get better results from the energy expended in operating the older types of pebble-mills in my metallurgical work. The more common use of pebble-mills goes back some 10 or 12 years, while their first commercial introduction will date to about 1895 or 1896; at least, it was about that time that I first came across the cylindrical pebble-mill, and while I was not a theoretical convert upon sight, I soon became a practical or empirical convert upon trying out the device. In studying the action of the old style of cylindrical tube-mill, Fig. 1, I could not reconcile the fact that initial and final energies remained the same throughout the length of mill in spite of previous reduction of size of

particles. The first mills were comparatively short, from 4 to 8 ft. long, then suddenly they were standardized at about 20 ft., probably by the builders of machinery, and the additional fact that they were more commonly used in the grinding of cement, which must be finished in one operation. The final conclusion at which I arrived was that the later practice of using a long tube-mill was wrong. My next construction of a tube-mill reduced it to 8 ft., and still later to 6 ft. At the feed end of the mill a certain energy was applied, which I will designate as a 1 lb. pebble unit, which is necessary to crush a 0.25-in. unit of material. At the outlet end of the mill this same pound-pebble unit was still being employed even though the particle had been reduced to 1/8 to 1/16, to 1/32 in. and so on in the same proportion of mass division, so that the 0.25-in. mass had been successively divided until the original particle was represented by more than 500 particles of 1/32 in., upon which, or, at best, upon several of which, particles there was being used the same 1 lb. energy unit as was employed at the feed end of the mill. This would be equivalent to crushing 1-in. cubes of ore in a rock-crusher designed to reduce a mass containing several hundred 1-in. cubes. The latter would be ridiculed simply because the discrepancy is physically evident, but we go on with the still poorer practice of trying to reduce a 1/500 particle with the same medium used to reduce the original unit mass, simply because we cannot see or feel the energy difference. It is equivalent to the return constantly of the 1-in. cube to the giant crusher in the hope that it may, as it eventually will, ultimately meet with some obstructions and be by chance further reduced. But during all this time energy is being expended in friction of moving parts without material division. On the other hand, it is hardly to be hoped that we can reach beyond mechanical means to obtain a required result, as would be the case if we endeavored accurately to adjust the cause to the effect desired, but we certainly can do better than to continue to employ the pound-pebble unit of energy when a 1-oz. unit will produce better results. This I have endeavored to do in the conical mill, in the different diameters of which are segregated forces proportional to the work to be performed; using the largest pebbles, the greatest peripheral speed, and the greatest gravimetricforce upon the coarsest particles, gradually reducing them in the diminishing diameters of the cone, thus gradually diminishing all the forces commensurate, or proportionately commensurate, to the work required in reduction, though retaining the same number of grinding mediums. In other words, lines of force in the Hardinge mill converge at a point where the greatest power is needed and energy recedes in proportion to the force required in reduction, as illustrated in Fig. 2. Kicks law of power required for dividing particles of matter, although formulated by Kick 50 years ago, is still referred to in textbooks as defining the work performed in division and is as follows:

Apparently the principle in the inanimate machine is nearing that of the animate, and is a survival of the fittest, for it is an inherent mechanical property of the machine which controls the conditions whereby the largest bodies seek and maintain positions of greatest force and exert their power upon the weaker, if the latter are in the path of the larger; and it appears to be a case of the survival of the largest; e.g., in the conical mill the largest pebbles or balls, the greatest superincumbent weights, and the greatest peripheral speeds all segregate towards the greatest diameter of the mill, likewise other sizes seek zones or positions in proportion to mass and weight acting in conjunction with gravity and central forces. The same rule holds

good in regard to the particles undergoing division, as illustrated in Fig. 2, in which it will be noted that the grinding mediums automatically adjust or classify themselves to the work to be performed, embodying a step- or stage-reduction within a single machine through a combination of percussion and attrition. Comparatively, a sledge-hammer is used upon a spike, a nail-hammer upon a nail, and a tack-hammer upon a tack, utilizing the mechanical forces more economically than would be the case in using a sledge-hammer without regard as to whether the blow was to be delivered upon the spike, nail or tack.

The illustration of the segregation of the large and small grinding bodies (Danish pebbles) shown in Fig. 3 is taken from a report of an independent engineer of international reputation in order to verify if possible my claims.

reduced material to rolls of different sizes, as illustrated in Fig. 4, although more often the poorer practice is resorted to of returning to the same roll the oversizes of its previous reduction, which must now depend for further division upon crushing (mashing) in a choked feed an energy-wasting method.

The above remarks relative to the conical pebble-mill also apply to the conical ball-mill, which is similar in all respects to the pebble-mill except that instead of using flint lining and pebbles, steel lining and balls are used to do the crushing. The latter is now coming into use in the place of stamps as a more economical device. The stamp to-day is gradually receding from its former prestige owing to its being neither an economical fine or coarse crusher, as the term is now understood. A few years ago 30-mesh was considered fine crushing, but it is so no longer. If one should insist upon its use as a fine crusher and to obtain mechanically commensurate results for power expended, the stamp should be reduced in proportional size to the work required and the screen-aperture should also be likewise reduced. It has taken us a long time to recognize the fact that to economize energy, the units of force must correspond to the units of matter being acted upon, as explained in Kicks law. In the breaking of a 2-in. cube of ore by a single drop of a 1,000-lb. stamp, we divide the mass into an approximate average size of 0.25-in. cubes, and perform reduction of 1 to 500. Assuming the energy has been well applied, the further reduction should be in the same ratio of energy to work, but instead of reducing the weight of the stamp to 1/500 of the original, the work continues with the initial 1,000 lb. of energya sledge-hammer is now doing tack-hammer work.

The step-reduction mentioned above is further illustrated by the reducing sizes of stamps, shown in shadow, against the Hardinge mill, as in Fig. 5, in which the weight and number of the balls are proportional to the reduced size of stamps.

We have many times been asked to explain the action within the conical mill and a cause for its reasonably uniform product. The answer would resolve itself into the explanation of the automatic segregation of forces in proportion to mass being acted upon by different degrees of rotative energy. In addition to these natural automatic laws, the conical mill is subject to still further regulation by changing the axis to various inclinations from the horizontal, which will cause the finer particles to travel towards the outlet much more rapidly and consequently be subject to lesser action of the grinding bodies, as their travel will be assisted by gravity rather than displacement by the heavier bodies and the attendant crushing. A practical illustration of this action can easily be obtained by placing two glass funnels base to base after partly filling them with gravel and fine dry sand, joining them with cement or adhesive tape, then evenly revolving with the axis horizontal; the experiment may also be tried having the axis at a slight inclination from the horizontal, as illustrated in Fig. 6. The result will be found to be curious and interesting mainly because unexpected.

A feature of considerable importance in the Hardinge mill is the fact that the grinding bodies, whether of steel balls, flint pebbles, or large pieces of the ore itself, are utilized to a finality; thus there is no rejection before actual final consumption, no scrap-heap of costly and partly-consumed material, for after the first charging of the mill with its grinding mediums, the subsequent and desirable difference in sizes of grinding mediums is produced by the wearing away of the larger sizes. No grinding body is thus discarded because it is too small.

The pebble-mills are lined with silex blocks throughout, or a combination of silex and ribbed steel or smooth plates, the plates being fitted with a special design of lifting-bar, which not only assists in lifting the mass of grinding bodies higher, affording greater impact in the central portion of the mill, but also prevents any slipping of the charge.

Authorities vary widely as to the best speed for rotation of pebble-mills; in the case of the ordinary cylindrical mill (Fig. 1) the speed is rarely brought above 500 peripheral ft. per min., ranging between 400 and 500 ft. per min.; this speed, of course, is maintained throughout the total length (average) of 20 ft. In the case of the conical mill it can be more effectively operated at a peripheral speed of about 750 ft. per min. for the 8-ft. mill, but is maintained at this speed only for a length of about 20 in. instead of 20 ft. For the ordinary granular reduction, desired in concentration and other metallurgical processes, wherein a maximum of about 20-mesh and a minimum of slimes is the end desired, this speed of 750 peripheral ft. per min. (in the 8-ft. mill) is gradually reduced in proportion to the energy necessary for the further reduction of the previously divided particle. Thus in the one machine peripheral speedsconsequently the energiesvary from 200 to 750 ft. per min. in gradual stages or steps. It is a device wherein the same revolutions per minute produce a multiplicity of gradually changing peripheral speeds proportional to the diameter of the cone.

The company was under the impression that the Chilean mill had the better of the argument, based upon gross tonnage fed, even though the power and water consumed (both costly items) were in favor of the Hardinge mill. Net tonnage was the economic feature, therefore also vastly in favor of the Hardinge mill.

In order to examine the results of this test properly, the cumulative percentage on each mesh was plotted for both machines, as shown on the lower half of Fig. 7. The line marked Line of Ideal Product is a uniformly graded product through 20-and all on 200-mesh, which will give a maximum extraction of copper from this ore, which was a disseminated sulphide.

As may be seen from the curves, the product from the Hardinge mill approaches this ideal line more closely than does that from the Chilean mill, and, is therefore, better suited for the economical extraction of its metal-content. The curves also show the Hardinge mill has finished 98.2 per cent, of its feed through 20-mesh, whereas the Chilean mill puts through this screen only 66.6 per cent, of the same feed. Of these quantities, the Hardinge mill has only put 21.89 per cent, through 200-mesh, as compared with 45.49 per cent, for the Chilean mill. In other words, the Hardinge mill gives 76.7 per cent, of its total feed as a product from which the maximum amount of copper can be extracted, while the Chilean mill gives only 36.3 per cent, between the same limits (through 20-mesh and on 200), as is shown in the upper half of diagram. Here the percentage on each mesh has been plotted, as shown, and from the figures on Per Cent, of Total Copper in Table I. the values at the right were calculated.

Considering the amount of copper contained in the two products, that from the Hardinge mill has 71.8 per cent, of its total copper-content in the material through 20- and on 200- mesh, as compared with 34.34 per cent, for the Chilean mill.

As to the amount of water required, the Hardinge mill used only 19.25 gal. per minute per ton per hour put through 20-mesh, whereas the Chilean mill used 43.84 gal. In a locality where water is scarce, this is a very important item. Although no mention is made of horse-power in the data given us, nevertheless, judging from other installations of the same character, the Hardinge mill requires less than 70 per cent, of that needed to operate the Chilean mill.

These figures show that although the Chilean mill received a feed of 17 per cent, more than the Hardinge mill, the latter finished 27 per cent, more through 20-mesh, and has 82.5 per cent, more than the Chilean mill between the desirable limits of 20- and 200-mesh. The Hardinge mill also has over twice as much copper within these limits of economical extraction, using less than half the amount of water per ton; and presumably requiring two-thirds the horse-power.

A certain prejudice appears to exist against the use of ball-mills, particularly the older types which have mainly been successful on dry crushing, and to which Philip Argall refers in his article as follows :

Those who are not familiar with ball-mills might do well to consider the difference between the Hardinge and the German type probably referred to by Mr. Argall. These two distinct types of ball-mills should hardly be classed together any more

than a gyratory should be classed with the jaw type of rock crusher, simply because they both come under the general head of crushers. Fig. 8 graphically illustrates the difference in the two types of ball-mills above mentioned, which we further compare as follows:

The German ball-mill has been in successful operation many years, particularly in Australia, though it has not found much use in America. The conical ball-mill as now constructed and used comes into direct competition with stamps owing to its extreme simplicity, and enters into a particularly simple flow-sheet, shown in Fig. 9, producing a crushed material of the grades shown in Table IV., furnished by the Porcupine Gold Mining Co., of Porcupine, Canada. For the particular installation mentioned the consumption of balls and lining is given as less than 1 lb. per ton of ore ground. The material fed to the ball-mill, some of which exceeds 2 in. in diameter, is taken directly from a rock-crusher.

Metallurgical requirements calling for granulation with a minimum of colloids or slimes are fulfilled along the lines of flow-sheet shown in Fig. 10. We append results of this style of installation furnished by the Beaver Consolidated Mines, Ltd., of Cobalt, Canada, shown in Table V.

As further illustrative of the wide range of the conical mill, Table VI. gives results of crushing in the same size (8 ft.) of mill upon different classes of material, from flint-conglomerate ores of the Lake copper-district to the softer porphyry copper-ores of Arizona. Naturally, vastly different tonnages are obtained according to hardness and other physical properties.

(a) Granular grinding for concentration with a minimum of slimes, taking a product or feed passing - to 3/8-in. screen. (b) Fine or slime crushing with a minimum of coarse, taking a feed of 0.25 in. or less. (c) Ball-mills taking 2 in. and smaller cubes, replacing stamps, rolls and other coarse to fine crushers.

The Hardinge mill has gone through the usual stages of competition and patent infringement which ordinarily follow the introduction of a successful device. The patents have been upheld by the U. S. Circuit Court and the U. S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

used ball mills | ball mills for sale | phoenix equipment

used ball mills | ball mills for sale | phoenix equipment

Why buy a brand new ball mill when we have high-quality used and refurbished ball mills for sale? Well-made industrial equipment from top manufacturers maintain their value and save your company or industry substantially.

Ball mills are a fundamental part of the manufacturing industry in the USA as well as around the world. Ball mills crush material into various sizes and extract resources from mined materials. Pebble mills are a type of ball mill and are also used to reduce the size of hard materials, down to 1 micron or less.

Because of their fairly simple design, ball mills and pebble mills are less likely to need costly repairs (unlike other crushing or extraction equipment) making them an attractive option for businesses on a budget.

Unused 24 x 41 Polysius EGL Ball Mill. Steel Lined. Twin 7MW Electric Motor Drives, 14MW/11kV Power Supply Unit. Twin Combiflex Fixed Speed Gear Drive. Auxiliary Drive Motors, Lubrication Unit Fixed Bearing and Lubrication Unit Floating Bearing, Frozen Charge Protection System, Vibration Sensors for COMBIFLEX, Dam Ring, Permanent installed Centrifuge for Fixed Bearing, Closed Circuit Chiller Unit, Insurance and Commissioning Spares, Special Tools. Qty 2 Available.

Used 11.5' diameter X 17' long ball mill. Manufactured by KVS (Kennedy Van Saun). 1000 HP open winding synchronous motor. Features trommel discharge and feed tank. Refurbished in 2013, which included installation of new oil jacking system, oil lube system for Babbitt bearings, new titanium steel water jet-machined discharge grates, and motor refurbishment. Set of new babbit bearings available. Previously operated as a closed circuit dry mill with grinding capacity of 40 metric tons per hour with output fineness of >80% passing 200 mesh. Motor operating speed of 15.8 RPM charged with approximately 78 tons of 1", 2" and 3" steel balls. Last used at a phosphate processing facility and in good condition.

Used 8' x 10' Epworth 200 HP jacketed steel ball mill, approximately 8' diameter x 10' long, jacketed chamber, gear and pinion driven with approximately 200 motor drive, on stands, Serial# K-0845.

Used 175HP Hosokawa Alpine Super Orion Continuous Ball mill. Model 195/495 CLKE. Alumina Oxide lined. 195 cm (76")inner diameter x 495 cm (194") long drum, periphery dry discharge with adjustable discharge openings, enclosed discharge housing, direct driven thru gearbox. 175HP 460 volt motor with VFD motor controller. Serial# C1198474. Built 2012.

Used 6' x 8' Paul Abbe jacketed 100 HP steel ball mill, approximately 6' diameter x 8' long, jacketed chamber, gear and pinion driven with approximately 100 motor drive, on stands.

Unused 5' diameter X 6' long Steel Lined Ball Mill, manufactured by Patterson Industries, Type D, non-jacketed, with AR400 steel liners. Includes 30 HP, 3 phase, 60 Hz, 230-460 V, 1725 RPM motor. Mill drive is integrally coupled to horizontal parallel shafted helical gear reducer. Continuous type, with product feeding through spiral inlet trunnion and exiting through the discharge end trunnion. Features cylinder manway access door for cleaning. Internal volume measures approximately 839 USG (112 CF). Mill shell is lined with (24) 1/4" thick liner plates, each head lined with (8) 3/8" thick pie-shaped liner plates. Mounted on stand with approximately 66" clearance between the mill cylinder and floor. Mills were intended for use in glass particle size reduction but were never installed. Manufactured in 2019, units are still in factory plastic wrap and in new condition. (Qty - 2 available)

Used 5 ft. dia. x 6 ft. (Approx 120 Cu.Ft) Patterson Pebble Mill. Alumina brick lining. On stand with 20 HP motor and gear reduced drive with brake. Bull gear and pinion. Babbit bearings. Door is polyurethane and has a drain with plug.

Used 4' x 5' (345 Gallon Total/210 Gallon Working) Ball Mill. Mfg Steveco. Steel Lining. Jacketed. 20 HP (460V/60Hz/3ph) Gear Reduced heavy duty drive on high stands. Solid door and discharge door.

Used Paul O. Abbe One Piece Ceramic Ball Mill, Model JM-300. Non-Jacketed chamber approximate 24.8" diameter x 39.5" long. Vessel volume 300 liter (79 gallons). Approximate 5" charge and discharge port with cover. Driven by a 3 HP, 3/60/208-230/460 volt 1760 rpm motor with a shaft mounted Sumitomo Model 203E-25 reducer. Approximate 32 rpm drum speed. Includes a control panel with an ABB drive. Mounted on a common carbon steel frame legs. Serial # 0830032JM. Built 2008.

Used 28 Gallon Paul O. Abbe Ceramic Jar / Ball Mill. Approximate 3.7 Cubic Feet. Approximate 20" diameter x 20" straight side. Includes motor and cage. Mounted on a carbon steel frame with safety cage.

Used 30 gallon Paul O. Abbe Jar Mill. Porcelain jar 21" diameter x 18" straight side. Driven by 1hp, 1/60/115/230 volt, 1740 rpm motor thru a reducer, ratio 9.3 to 1. Inlet & outlet with cover and clamp. Mounted on carbon steel legs with a discharge housing. Serial#84876

Used 25 Gallon Norton Chemical Process Products Jar Mill. Porcelain jar 20" diameter x 20" straight side. Driven by 1hp, 3/60/230/460 volt, 1730 rpm motor thru a reducer, no ratio. Inlet & outlet with cover and clamp. Mounted on carbon steel legs with a discharge housing. Serial# AV-83104.

Used 35.30 Gallon Paul O. Abbe Jar Mill. Model 5A Porcelain jar 22" diameter x 20" straight side. Driven by 1hp, 3/60/230/460 volt, 1745 rpm motor thru a reducer, ratio 25 to 1. Inlet & outlet with cover and clamp. Mounted on carbon steel legs with a discharge housing. Serial#A41563.

Unused 24 x 41 Polysius EGL Ball Mill. Steel Lined. Twin 7MW Electric Motor Drives, 14MW/11kV Power Supply Unit. Twin Combiflex Fixed Speed Gear Drive. Auxiliary Drive Motors, Lubrication Unit Fixed Bearing and Lubrication Unit Floating Bearing, Frozen Charge Protection System, Vibration Sensors for COMBIFLEX, Dam Ring, Permanent installed Centrifuge for Fixed Bearing, Closed Circuit Chiller Unit, Insurance and Commissioning Spares, Special Tools. Qty 2 Available.

Used 11.5' diameter X 17' long ball mill. Manufactured by KVS (Kennedy Van Saun). 1000 HP open winding synchronous motor. Features trommel discharge and feed tank. Refurbished in 2013, which included installation of new oil jacking system, oil lube system for Babbitt bearings, new titanium steel water jet-machined discharge grates, and motor refurbishment. Set of new babbit bearings available. Previously operated as a closed circuit dry mill with grinding capacity of 40 metric tons per hour with output fineness of >80% passing 200 mesh. Motor operating speed of 15.8 RPM charged with approximately 78 tons of 1", 2" and 3" steel balls. Last used at a phosphate processing facility and in good condition.

Used 8' x 10' Epworth 200 HP jacketed steel ball mill, approximately 8' diameter x 10' long, jacketed chamber, gear and pinion driven with approximately 200 motor drive, on stands, Serial# K-0845.

Used 175HP Hosokawa Alpine Super Orion Continuous Ball mill. Model 195/495 CLKE. Alumina Oxide lined. 195 cm (76")inner diameter x 495 cm (194") long drum, periphery dry discharge with adjustable discharge openings, enclosed discharge housing, direct driven thru gearbox. 175HP 460 volt motor with VFD motor controller. Serial# C1198474. Built 2012.

Used 6' x 8' Paul Abbe jacketed 100 HP steel ball mill, approximately 6' diameter x 8' long, jacketed chamber, gear and pinion driven with approximately 100 motor drive, on stands.

Unused 5' diameter X 6' long Steel Lined Ball Mill, manufactured by Patterson Industries, Type D, non-jacketed, with AR400 steel liners. Includes 30 HP, 3 phase, 60 Hz, 230-460 V, 1725 RPM motor. Mill drive is integrally coupled to horizontal parallel shafted helical gear reducer. Continuous type, with product feeding through spiral inlet trunnion and exiting through the discharge end trunnion. Features cylinder manway access door for cleaning. Internal volume measures approximately 839 USG (112 CF). Mill shell is lined with (24) 1/4" thick liner plates, each head lined with (8) 3/8" thick pie-shaped liner plates. Mounted on stand with approximately 66" clearance between the mill cylinder and floor. Mills were intended for use in glass particle size reduction but were never installed. Manufactured in 2019, units are still in factory plastic wrap and in new condition. (Qty - 2 available)

Used 5 ft. dia. x 6 ft. (Approx 120 Cu.Ft) Patterson Pebble Mill. Alumina brick lining. On stand with 20 HP motor and gear reduced drive with brake. Bull gear and pinion. Babbit bearings. Door is polyurethane and has a drain with plug.

Used 4' x 5' (345 Gallon Total/210 Gallon Working) Ball Mill. Mfg Steveco. Steel Lining. Jacketed. 20 HP (460V/60Hz/3ph) Gear Reduced heavy duty drive on high stands. Solid door and discharge door.

Used Paul O. Abbe One Piece Ceramic Ball Mill, Model JM-300. Non-Jacketed chamber approximate 24.8" diameter x 39.5" long. Vessel volume 300 liter (79 gallons). Approximate 5" charge and discharge port with cover. Driven by a 3 HP, 3/60/208-230/460 volt 1760 rpm motor with a shaft mounted Sumitomo Model 203E-25 reducer. Approximate 32 rpm drum speed. Includes a control panel with an ABB drive. Mounted on a common carbon steel frame legs. Serial # 0830032JM. Built 2008.

Used 28 Gallon Paul O. Abbe Ceramic Jar / Ball Mill. Approximate 3.7 Cubic Feet. Approximate 20" diameter x 20" straight side. Includes motor and cage. Mounted on a carbon steel frame with safety cage.

Used 30 gallon Paul O. Abbe Jar Mill. Porcelain jar 21" diameter x 18" straight side. Driven by 1hp, 1/60/115/230 volt, 1740 rpm motor thru a reducer, ratio 9.3 to 1. Inlet & outlet with cover and clamp. Mounted on carbon steel legs with a discharge housing. Serial#84876

Used 25 Gallon Norton Chemical Process Products Jar Mill. Porcelain jar 20" diameter x 20" straight side. Driven by 1hp, 3/60/230/460 volt, 1730 rpm motor thru a reducer, no ratio. Inlet & outlet with cover and clamp. Mounted on carbon steel legs with a discharge housing. Serial# AV-83104.

Used 35.30 Gallon Paul O. Abbe Jar Mill. Model 5A Porcelain jar 22" diameter x 20" straight side. Driven by 1hp, 3/60/230/460 volt, 1745 rpm motor thru a reducer, ratio 25 to 1. Inlet & outlet with cover and clamp. Mounted on carbon steel legs with a discharge housing. Serial#A41563.

Phoenix Equipment is a global supplier of used ball mills. We have new, used and reconditioned ball mills from leading manufacturers, including: Paul O. Abbe Retsch Epworth Patterson Netzsch Newell Dunford Marcy Denver FL Smidth Nordberg Allis Chalmers Metso Hardinge Kurimoto Iron Works Kobe-Allis Chalmers Stevenson Fuller-Traylor Steveco Western Machinery Marion Machine Makrum and more. Ball mills are used in a wide-range of industrial applications: cement processing, paint dyes and pigmentation processing, coal and ore processing, chemical processing and pyrotechnics, and many others. Ball milling has several key advantages over other systems: cost of the grinding medium and installation is generally low works for batch or continuous operation (as well as closed-circuit grinding) suitable for a wide range of materials simple design ensures less repairs Whether you are in the market for a used ball mill for your business or you have a pre-owned ball mill youd like to sell, USA-based Phoenix Equipment can help. Contact us today to learn more about what Phoenix can do for you. Related equipment: Agitators, Screen/Separators, Kilns and Calciners, Scales and Extruders. Fill out our quick and easy quote form for more information about our Ball Mills inventory.

Ball mills are used in a wide-range of industrial applications: cement processing, paint dyes and pigmentation processing, coal and ore processing, chemical processing and pyrotechnics, and many others.

Whether you are in the market for a used ball mill for your business or you have a pre-owned ball mill youd like to sell, USA-based Phoenix Equipment can help. Contact us today to learn more about what Phoenix can do for you.

Phoenix Equipment buys and sells used chemical process equipment and plants for relocation. Our industry focus includes process plants and machinery in the chemical, petrochemical, fertilizer, refining, gas processing, power generation, pharmaceutical and food manufacturing industries. We have extensive experience acquiring processing plants and process lines that require the execution of complex dismantlement, demolition and decommissioning projects. Based in Red Bank, New Jersey, USA, we have team members located in China, India, Germany and relationships throughout the world.

Why Use Phoenix for Your Plant Dismantling & Plant Relocation Needs A Common Plant Liquidation Scenario Your company has made the tough decision to close a plant. This plant was running for years, and the company paid a lot to have it built, paid everyones salaries, and maintained or even modernized all of the production assets over the plants life but the plant needs to be sold off for one reason or another. Your company has called upon you to recover as much dollar as you can to help keep the organization alive, and better yet, healthy, in what is a constant battle in the marketplace. Youve either: Have spent months, maybe even years trying to find a buyer that would operate the plant in place, without any success, while the plants assets lose value every passing day. Or, you cant sell it to another company, as you are one of the few suppliers of the product the plant makes, and you dont want to create a competitor, or improve a competitors position. Or, the plant is on leased propert

Hydrogenation: Major Applications Hydrogenation is a billion-dollar industry. Hydrogenating means to add hydrogen to something. According to Haldor Topsoe, hydrogenation comprises 48% of total hydrogen consumption, 44% of which is for hydrocracking and hydrotreating in refineries , and 4% for hydrogenation of unsaturated hydrocarbons (including hardening of edible oil) and of aromatics, hydrogenation of aldehydes and ketones (for instance oxo-products), and hydrogenation of nitrobezene (for manufacture of aniline). Hydrocracking & Hydrotreating Industrially, hydrotreating and hydrocracking are performed in down flow trickle bed reactors, where the gas and the liquid feed are sent concurrently through a fixed bed plug flow reactor. Although the flow pattern in the reactor can be reasonably approximated, the observed kinetics in such a trickle bed reactor are quite often affected by minor unplanned oscillations in the flow. How the gas and liquid collide and mix together affects the end prod

Thermoplastics A Focus on Polyethylene & Polypropylene Thermoplastics are a class of polymers, that with the application of heat, can be softened and melted, and can be processed either in the heat-softened state (e.g. by thermoforming) or in the liquid state (e.g. by extrusion and injection molding). Over 70% of the plastics used in the world are thermoplastics, and the two most commonly used thermoplastics are both olefins, compound made up of hydrogen and carbon that contains one or more pairs of carbon atoms linked by a double bond. These two olefins are polyethylene and polypropylene. Polyethylene Polyethylene is a tough, light, flexible synthetic resin made by polymerizing ethylene, chiefly used for plastic bags, food containers, and other packaging. It may be of low density or high density depending upon the process used in its manufacturing. It is resistant to moisture and most of the chemicals. It can be heat sealed and is flexible at room temperature (and low temperature), and in additional to its material properties,

used conical mills for sale. sun hong equipment & more | machinio

used conical mills for sale. sun hong equipment & more | machinio

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Product Details Introduction The ball mill has two end covers, one is for feeding and the other one is for discharging. Ball mill end cover is one of the key part of ball mill, its structure is relatively complex...

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Hardinge Conical Ball Mill for Glass, Aggregates, Sands, Minerals, Fertilisers Continuous Ball mill for dry grinding of glass, sands, aggregates, Minerals, waste materials etc It's a 6ft x 5ft mill with int...

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