iron ore screening

iron ore screening

Iron ore screening equipmentfromMultotecis made from polyurethane or rubber screening media. Our screening equipment is ideal for high, medium or low grade profiles,reduce plant footprint by more than 33%and materials of construction ensure along lifeatreduced costwithlow maintenancerequirements.

Our polyurethane and rubber iron ore screening solutions are manufactured using state-of-the-art injection moulding and rubber compression moulding machines. Aperture sizes and panel materials are tailored for use with all types of screening, from coarse, heavy-duty to ultra-fine applications.

Our screening solutions manufacturing technique, combined with our in-depth understanding of mineral processing industry flow sheets, four decades of industry experience and dedication to research and development, ensures the best iron ore screening solution for your application.

Our hammer samplers provide representative, cross belt samples of particulate material from a moving conveyor belt. They are manufactured in South Africa according to ISO 9001:2000 standards, and can be set up to suit all conveyor belt installations from 450 mm to 2 100 mm wide.

The Longi-Multotec heavy media drum separator (HMDS) for screening improves grade and recovery in dense medium recovery processes. We combine leading magnet technology, an established, application-specific experience in mineral processing and high-quality configurations, materials and parts, to improve the performance of dense media mineral recovery operations

Multotec has designed and optimised screening spiral concentrators for minerals, including iron ore, supplied with steel rubber-lined or PVC/polyurethane pipe launder systems, ideal for iron ore screening.

Multotecs polyurethane screens are made with self-relieving apertures resulting in the unrestricted downward movement of any sized particle eliminating pegging and blinding from your iron ore screening.

We manufacture three varied dimensions of static and reversible sievebend housing units for iron ore screening. Both units are suited to polyurethane sievebends and have 3 standard dimensions, varying from 800 mm arc length to 1 600 mm arc length

ballistic control rubber | black iron rubber company

ballistic control rubber | black iron rubber company

Black Iron Rubber Co. has produced vulcanized rubber panels, blocks, sheets and curtains for ballistic control in military, law enforcement and private ranges for years (see clients page). We specialize in producing custom rubber with dimensions as small as 1 x 3 x 7 up to 2 x 48 x 96 sheets weighing almost 400 pounds.

Not all rubber is made the same. If you do a little research you will see (see attached .pdf info on vulcanized vs. binder technology). Start with BIRCO. Ballistic rubber is used to prevent escapes and ricochets in gun training ranges. Rubber can stop some rounds (depending on the thickness) but usually not. The rubber allows the bullets to pass through it and then strike a hard surface. Then its energy and original shape are lost so it safely comes to rest between the rubber and the hard surface (usually steel).

The physical properties of rubber polymers have been measured scientifically for years. Most properties are measured by impacting stress to the rubber. Tests like tensile strength, durometer, modulus, and density are routine rubber tests. A test called ultimate elongation is a crucial property in ballistic control rubber performance. Elongation is measured by taking a sample piece of the rubber and stretching it until it breaks. When a bullet round strikes rubber, the rubber should stretch and allow the bullet to pass through and then rebound to its original position allowing it to take a high number of strikes while preventing escapes. Our rubber will stretch to about 200% of its original size. Please ask any of other ballistic control manufacturers you are considering to provide their material testing data on the properties we listed above. Ours has been tested by the Akron Rubber Development Laboratory.

Our competition has been making grind and glue rubber and claiming that it has been made originally and exclusively to be shot at in ranges. What they are really saying it has been made to be replaced. One of our competitors claims to be the first to manufacture ballistic control rubber. Being first doesnt always mean the best (Motorola made the first cell phone)! They claim their rubber has been tested by Picatinny Arsenal, among a few others. But the test is only with their product! There is no direct performance comparison with a competitor, and we know why. They have been hyperactive in their attempts to disparage our vulcanized product because of the low quality and poor physical properties their rubber possesses. While their product has not changed in decades, we continue our efforts to improve our product.

They sell their product by volume, not weight. For example, their 9 x 12 x 24 D- Block weighs about 78 pounds. Our block with the same dimensions weighs 105 pounds, over 25% higher density! They claim that no other manufacturer can match their capabilities. Well, we do not want to match them, we go beyond them.

Not all rubber is made the same. For a grind and glue product sized reduced tire crumb is mixed with either a polyurethane binder/liquid latex in something as simple as a cement mixer, stir it all together and then put it in a mold, add pressure, and out it comes. Very simple process. Takes minutes.

For our product we batch virgin rubber/oil/curing chemicals/tire crumb and fire retardant and load the recipe in what is called an internal mixer. That compound is then compression molded. The product becomes cross linked at the molecular level, called vulcanization. This technology is the same as making automotive tires and yields a strong yet resilient product.

BIRCO has designed a ballistic rubber panel with a 1" x1" inset around the perimeter. The panel has a textured surface on both sides to allow the panel to be "flipped" and seat with the panels adjacent to it. This safety feature prevents gapping at the seams where rounds can escape control. This design also minimizes waste, where a section can merely flip over to fit in another area of the ballistic control system.

Size fraction: 0.5"-1.5" Made from size-reduced molded rubber parts - NOT TIRES! No steel, fiber or other contaminants. Absolutely NO tracer rounds should be used with ANY rubber panel, block, or media material.

privacy screens - ironmalta.com - malta's finest wrought iron and art metal works - state of the art online display

privacy screens - ironmalta.com - malta's finest wrought iron and art metal works - state of the art online display

and for any other inconvenience caused. we try our best in the process thus due to customisd quotes they are very difficult and complicated to finalised. we try always to be quote fairly and competitively as possible.

WITH AN ARTISTIC CNC LASER DESIGNERS, THAT WILL OFFER TO GIVE THAT MODERN TOUCH,AND TO USE OUR LATEST MASTERED ENGINEERING AND TECHNIQUES AVAILABLE UP TO DAY, TO YOUR PROJECTS, WE OFFER MAINLY: A RELIABLE SERVICE WITH THE HIGHEST QUALITY POSSIBLE ON THE MARKET, AN EYE FOR DETAILS AND THE HIGHEST REFINMENT HUMANLY POSSIBLE GUARANTEED.

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play sand ballast - model railroader magazine - model railroading, model trains, reviews, track plans, and forums

play sand ballast - model railroader magazine - model railroading, model trains, reviews, track plans, and forums

My guess is he dyes the sand first, maybe bakes it to dry the dye, then glues it. Once the matte medium, PVA or whatever adhesive you use seals the sand it won't take dyes very well. I've used a little India ink to simulate oil patches and it really doesn't soak in that well once glue has been applied.

Good point Ed. After I entered the post, I wondered if he layed out the sand, then sprayed on the alcohol/dye mix to settle the sand grains in, and promote glue penetration, then applied the diluted glue.

I am very interested in this technique as I live overseas in a country were model railroading is practically unheard of. I am trying to find a source of balast, but I don't know of any places were you can get crushed rock or gravel to use as balast. As the local dirt is quite sandy, this could work! It sure beats having to stock up on balast when I visit the states!

"When I had to tear it down, it was a sad day. A new layout is under construction. ... I have many more feet of track to lay. I just cant afford all the new Peco turnouts I need for the terminal yards. I buy a couple a month.

To answer the ballast question: I first lay and shape the ballast (sand in my case). Then I wet it with the tinted 70% isopropyl alcohol and then apply the 50/50 white glue. I described this process in an article in the February 2014 MR."

I'd suggest sifting the sand several times through multiple tiny sieves. The goal is to remove all the fines (especially dust and powder), leaving just the granular hard sand particles. If there are a lot of fines in the ballast spread dry on the track, when the glue mixture is applied the final result could end up with a smooth surface that looks more like concrete than gritty scale ballast.

A friend gave me a couple of large containers of ballast, one fairly coarse, the other much finer. It was part of an order of several tons of crushed stone which he had ordered for his driveway.There was a fair amount of "fines" with the stone, and he managed to sieve enough to ballast his entire layout - a large one in its own building, featuring a four track main line - the Pennsy, or at least a good representation of part of it, in HO.While the main part of my layout was ballasted using Woodland Scenics ballast, I decided to give the real rock stuff a try on the recently added upper level.

I bought two bags and set about running the material through successively-smaller screen - fine-mesh hardware cloth initially, then through finer and finer sieves. (Do this operation outdoors, as it creates a fair amount of dust.)Eventually, I had the size needed for the ballast I wanted, but, unfortunately, it included the fine dust - useable perhaps as ground cover on a road or parking lot, but not likely too good as ballast.Baffled on how to get rid of it, I contacted my friend, and learned that he had used a "spatter guard" as the final sieve. The mesh was fine enough that only the dust passed through, leaving useable the ballast.My locally-sourced ballast is a slightly different colour than that from Ohio, which makes for a very prototypical situation as seen on a real railroad, where ballast often comes from different quarries.

Avoid putting any ballast between the ties of a turnout where the throwbar is located, then use a soft brush, like the one in the photo above, to "groom" the ballast. Do not, however, "brush" it, but rather use the brush, held almost parallel to the track, to drag the ballast where you want it. (Brushing will simply flick the ballast all over the place, especially the lighter-weight Woodland Scenics stuff.)

If you're ballasting turnouts, place a small amount of plastic-compatible oil on the tops of all ties over which the points will move, then move the points back and forth several times to spread the oil. Park the points at mid-throw, using a scrap of wood or styrene, if necessary, to keep them from touching the stock rails. This will prevent the moving parts of the turnout from being cemented in place.

I use a good-quality sprayer to wet the ballast, using a few drops of dish detergent in distilled water (available at any supermarket or, if you have a dehumidifier, clean the collector bucket, and use the water that it takes from the air.)

Don't skimp on the water - the biggest cause of unsatisfactory results with ballasting or adding ground cover is due to insufficient wetting. For the diluted glue to penetrate right down to the scenery base, the water must be of suffient quantity to draw it that deep. I usually have water pooling alongside areas being ballasted or sceniced. Some folks prefer alcohol for wetting (I prefer it for wetting my whistle, but a different kind of alcohol). While it will work well-enough, I don't use it due to the cost and to the fact that I usually do this work in fairly large areas, where the faster-evapourating alcohol might be gone by the time I get to some areas.

Note the diluted glue seeping from the edges of the ballast. This indicates that it's penetrated right through, which will yield a good, strong bond. You could sprinkle a little ground foam along the edges, if you wish, then give it a light spray of wet water to allow the glue to penetrate - a start on your trackside scenery.I use a small dropper-type bottle to apply the diluted white glue...

- don't recall its origin, but squeeze-type dispensers for things like mustard or ketchup should work, too - don't, of course, squeeze them, but rather allow the diluted glue to simply drip from them - you'll see immediately how quickly the glue spreads due to the pre-wetting.

This particular one is brass, but also available in stainless steel. Here's a link to one of those giant online shops (Note: providing the link in no way indicates that I support one shop or another. For info only.)

https://www.amazon.com/0-074mm-Aperture-Standard-Sieve-Stainless/dp/B074NNX343/ref=asc_df_B074NNX343/?tag=bingshoppinga-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid={creative}&hvpos={adposition}&hvnetw=o&hvrand={random}&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=e&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl={devicemodel}&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=&hvtargid=pla-4583795260903216&psc=1

abut six years ago i used sand blasting sand from princess auto, maybe seven dollars for a fifty poung bag .... the sand was rough and sharp, not smooth at all, and had quite a bit if variety of color in it ....

As an aside, I wondered how clean this sand was and stuck a strong magnet in the sand. I was amazed at how much metal was in the sand. I made that a regular process of commercial sand. Now, that I have all the track laid and ballasted, I'm not too worried about the sand I have left. We used to use the leftover sand in coffee cans to make butt cans when we smoked (never in the apartment).

I used to work at a place that received steel forgings for our products in large tubs. The tubs always had bunches of different colored loose rust in the bottom, yellowish, orangeish, reddish. I scraped up probably 10 pounds of the different colors, and sift the rust through the smaller screens when I need to give a "rusty" look to something. I've gotten several complements and "how'd you do that" questions on a fleet of ore jennies I used real rust on to 'model' rust.

I recently cut up a large water heater in our attic, that had died. It was too big to get through the access door. The inside produced about 5 pounds of exquisitly colored rust. Smashed this with a hammer an now how so great material that is real rust. But I hesitated to use it because it is still iron. Was a bit concerned about motor magnets picking it up. But guess it is not a problem, once a fixative is applied. Cheers, andy

I had an ABBA set of Globe diesels, in which only one truck in one of the B-units was powered. It was a Lindsey /Lindsay power truck, a combination motor and gearbox in a Blomberg-style truck. The unit was pretty-much sealed, but because it was so close to the track, it often picked up trip pins which sometimes dropped out of the K-Type Kadees in use at that time....

However, I don't recall ever having any other motor pick up ferrous material unless both were laying in proximity to one another on my workbench. Even those rare earth magnets that are capable of lifting small anvils don't seem to be a problem in the open frame motors where I've installed them.I run "live" loads in most of my open cars, and for gondolas, a lot of that is scrap made mostly from...what else?... but metal...

...and, like real hoppers, some of it falls alongside the track as the cars move around the layout. Some of it is ferrous, and could be picked up by a magnet, but I don't have any locos with motors close enough to the track to do so.

hardcoalcase In the Blueberry Line article in the Sept. MR, the author says, "... I began making my own ballast from sifted play sand that I tinted with a wash of isopropyl alcohol and black shoe dye." Interesting thought, I presume he glues the sand to the roadbed first, then applies the diluted dye, which would create variations in the color of the ballast. Anyone else using this technique? Perhaps over regular ballast? Jim

riogrande5761 hardcoalcase In the Blueberry Line article in the Sept. MR, the author says, "... I began making my own ballast from sifted play sand that I tinted with a wash of isopropyl alcohol and black shoe dye." Interesting thought, I presume he glues the sand to the roadbed first, then applies the diluted dye, which would create variations in the color of the ballast. Anyone else using this technique? Perhaps over regular ballast? Jim Seems like an awful lot of work when you can just buy a jar of real rock ballast from Scenic Express or one of the others and be done with it. It isn't all that expensive and will go a long way.

And here is the thing about beach sand (coming from a geologist by education/career). Even if you go to the trouble to get seives and "screen" it to get it the right size for your scale, and then get it dyed or colored appropriately, it still may not look right as beach sand tends to be rounded and railroad ballast is usually angular.

I have thought of taking a couple of cups of sand from the beach a few blocks a way, sifting it to remove junk and applying it. One thing I definitely, don' want to do is lug home a 50 lb bag of sand or other material that could go all over and put me in divorce court. Add Qu

dknelson Guys - I asked my friend Bob Wundrock (the author of the article in question) about the ballast question. Here is his response which he asked me to post here: "When I had to tear it down, it was a sad day. A new layout is under construction. ... I have many more feet of track to lay. I just cant afford all the new Peco turnouts I need for the terminal yards. I buy a couple a month. To answer the ballast question: I first lay and shape the ballast (sand in my case). Then I wet it with the tinted 70% isopropyl alcohol and then apply the 50/50 white glue. I described this process in an article in the February 2014 MR." Dave Nelson

"When I had to tear it down, it was a sad day. A new layout is under construction. ... I have many more feet of track to lay. I just cant afford all the new Peco turnouts I need for the terminal yards. I buy a couple a month.

To answer the ballast question: I first lay and shape the ballast (sand in my case). Then I wet it with the tinted 70% isopropyl alcohol and then apply the 50/50 white glue. I described this process in an article in the February 2014 MR."

Bob Wundrock's article in the Feb. '14 MR is "Expand a staging yard into the aisle". The reference to using play sand for ballast is on page 70; and the 70% isopropyl is tinted with black leather dye. BTW, the track and ballast looks great!

If using beach sand, could it contain salt? Would this type of sand not be good to use on a layout? Salt draws moisture. I have shied away from using beach sandon my layout from my thinking, am I wrong in thinking this?

railway ballast recycling plants from cde global

railway ballast recycling plants from cde global

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an overview on the treatment of ballast water in ships - sciencedirect

an overview on the treatment of ballast water in ships - sciencedirect

Ballast water has become a very significant problem with the introduction of invasive species.Ballast water exchange plus ballast water treatment is very effective.Among the ballast water treatment, filtration followed by mechanical treatment is effective..Strong hydroxyl radical treatment shows effectiveness in saving power, space, cost and efficiency.New treatment system like laser treatment can be further researched.

Introduction of invasive species through ballast water discharge has been a serious concern with the marine ecosystem. With growing research in the ballast water management, recent studies are being focused on the types of invasive species and physico-chemical parameters discharging into ports. Different treatment and management strategies have been internationally implemented in ships in accordance with ratification of 2004 convention. During designing of new ships ballast water management addresses many innovations by adopting different combination of physical and chemical methods.

In depth knowledge on indigenous species of marine ecology is very much important in evaluating invasion of species. Treatment systems used for ballast water are systems adapted for industrial and municipal applications. It is observed that different combination of treatment systems have to be implemented for varied species of organisms present in the ballast tank. Mechanical treatment combined with filtration is found to be the most effective treatment for variable species of organisms and physico-chemical parameters present in the ballast tank. Treatments such as filtration and magnetic separation; filtration and gravity separation; Ultra sound technology, Electrochemical and ozone treatment are found to inactivate 100% of organisms especially zooplanktons and bacteria. A filtration step followed by hydroxyl radical treatment has been found to be the most energy efficient, cost effective, low power consuming and able to inactivate 100% of organisms. Further research should develop a better treatment technology for the ballast water to be D-2 compliant.

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